News

War Film ‘P.O.W. The Escape,’ Western ‘The Wicked Die Slow’ Among Titles Due on Blu-ray From MVD and Ronin Flix May 16

War Film ‘P.O.W. The Escape,’ Western ‘The Wicked Die Slow’ Among Titles Due on Blu-ray From MVD and Ronin Flix May 16

Three war films — P.O.W. The Escape, Opposing Force and The Killing Box — and the Western The Wicked Die Slow are headed to Blu-ray Disc May 16 from Ronin Flix and MVD Entertainment Group.

In the war film P.O.W. The Escape (1986), Washington sends an army led by Col. Cooper (David Carradine) to rescue POWs in Vietnam, but it fails and Cooper is captured. In an attempt to make a profitable escape with stolen money before the United States pulls out of the war, a corrupt North Vietnamese prison camp commander (Mako, Academy Award nominee for Sand Pebbles) forces his prisoners, along with Cooper, to go with him to ensure his safe passage. The film also stars Steve James (American Ninja, Delta Force), Charles Floyd (Rappin’, Delta Force) and Phil Brock (Thunder Alley, American Ninja). Special features include on-camera interviews with director Gideon Amir, screenwriter James Bruner and stunt man Steve Lambert.

In the action adventure Opposing Force (1986), the only female soldier (Lisa Eichhorn, Cutter’s Way, Yanks) in a military experiment designed to simulate POW torture conditions falls victim to the commanding officer (Anthony Zerbe, The Omega Man, Farewell My Lovely). He justifies his insidious actions as a training technique. When Logan (Tom Skerritt, Big Bad Mama, Alien, Fighting Back) rebels with her and tries to dust out the others, it causes an all out war. The film also stars Richard Roundtree (Shaft, Earthquake, Man Friday) and John Considine (Doctor Death Seeker of Souls, Welcome to L.A.) and is directed by action veteran Eric Karson (The Octagon, Black Eagle). The film (also known as “Hell Camp”) is reproduced from a new HD master. Bonus features include audio commentary with Karson and an alternate ending.

In the Civil War film The Killing Box (1993), a Union soldier (Adrian Pasdar, Near Dark, Carlito’s Way, Top Gun) is recruited to investigate a series of crucifixions by a renegade band of Confederate soldiers. He enlists the help of his old mentor (Corbin Bernsen, TV’s “LA Law,” Hellos Again, Major League) and a mute runaway slave girl (Cynda Williams, One False Move, Mo’ Betta Blues), the only witness to the renegade band’s attacks. With the addition of some trigger happy Yankees, the brigade is now complete. Unfortunately, they soon realize they are not hunting ordinary Confederates. Life and death is on the line, but when the enemy may not even be alive, it becomes a gruesome tale of horror like no other. The film also stars Ray Wise (“Twin Peaks,” The Rift, Jeepers Creepers 2), Martin Sheen (Apocalypse Now, The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane, The Cassandra Crossing), Matt LeBlanc (TV’s “Friends,” Lost in Space), David Arquette (“Scream” series, Never Been Kissed, Eight Legged Freaks), Billy Bob Thornton (Sling Blade, A Simple Plan, Bandits) and is directed by George Hickenlooper (Hearts of Darkness). This film has been released under four different titles and is also know as The Lost Brigade, Ghost Brigade and Grey Knight.

Subscribe HERE to the FREE Media Play News Daily Newsletter!

In the Western The Wicked Die Slow (1968) — never-before-released in the United States on home video — a notorious gunfighter “The Kid” (Gary Allen), and his Mexican sidekick Armadillo (Jeff Kanew, Revenge of the Nerds, Gotcha, Tough Guys), saddle their way through the post- Civil War West looking for the four drunken and sadistic Indians who brutally attacked The Kid’s girlfriend. As they trek, they come upon a band of outlaws who beat up an old man and his daughter and also went after another woman. The Kid and Armadillo decide to take the law into their own hands and first kill the gang of outlaws, and then go after the Indians. As The Kid defeats the outlaw leader, he makes sure “the wicked die slow.” The long lost adult Western is reproduced from a brand new HD master, uncut and in scope. Extras include an on-camera interview with Jeff Kanew. The Wicked Die Slow is one of a handful of American films created to capitalize on the violent Spaghetti Westerns pouring out of Europe in the 1960s.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

18 − three =

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.