Vice Chairman: Lionsgate ‘Very Interested’ in Third-Party Merger

Lionsgate is shopping – itself.

With AT&T’s $85.4 billion acquisition of Time Warner in regulatory limbo, and Walt Disney’s $52.4 billion acquisition of select 21st Century Fox assets, including 20th Century Fox, pending, big media mergers are on the mind of Michael Burns, vice chairman of Lionsgate.

With a $7 billion market cap, Burns says Lionsgate is a “pint-sized bite” for potential suitors compared to “800-pound” gorillas like AT&T. Speaking on CNBC, Burns reiterated the usual “enhancing shareholder value” mantra driving publicly-traded companies like Lionsgate to acquire or be acquired.

Burns was quizzed about the likelihood of Lionsgate merging with Verizon, Comcast, Amazon or possible reunified Viacom/CBS.

He said merging with a telecom such as Verizon could be a big deal, provided the telecom decided what businesses it wants to be in. Burns was alluding to Verizon CEO Lowell McAdam, who, on the fiscal call, said the telecom wasn’t looking at any M&A activity in the short-term.

Burns said he is very interested in the outcome of the DOJ’s antitrust lawsuit against the AT&T/Time Warner merger. The executive called Comcast’s $30 billion acquisition of NBC Universal in 2011 the deal of the century.

“Again, you have to show organic growth or you have to make acquisitions, like us, which would be a bolt-on acquisition for [Comcast],” Burns said.

He said Lionsgate is talking to other media companies “all the time to see if a deal makes sense.”

Merging with Amazon would seem realistic given the ecommerce behemoth’s 70 million Prime members and ongoing content deals between the two companies, including movies The Big Sick and Oscar winner Manchester by the Sea.

“We’re a customer of Amazon and we are doing a lot of business with them,” Burns said. “We think there is more and more to do with them.”

He said media companies, particularly in the tech space, have to decide whether they want to “build it” or “buy it” when determining how far ahead the competition is in the streaming and subscription business.

“We’re very interested in the consolidation space,” Burns said. “Obviously that’s very important to us.”

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