‘Full Metal Jacket’ Coming to 4K Ultra HD Sept. 22

Full Metal Jacket, Stanley Kubrick’s acclaimed 1987 Vietnam War film, will come out on 4K Ultra HD and digital from Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Sept. 22.

Based on Gustav Hasford’s 1979 novel The Short-TimersFull Metal Jacket was produced and directed by Kubrick from a screenplay by Kubrick, Michael Herr and Hasford.

The film stars Matthew Modine (BirdyVision Quest, television’s “Stranger Things”), Adam Baldwin (Independence DaySerenity), Vincent D’Onofrio (Men in BlackJurassic World), Lee Ermey (SevenToy Story franchise), Dorian Harewood (GothikaAssault on Precinct 13), Arliss Howard (Amistad, Moneyball), Kevyn Major Howard (Alien Nation) and Ed O’Ross (Dick Tracy).

A saga about the Vietnam War and the dehumanizing process that turns people into trained killers, the film follows ‘Joker’ (Matthew Modine), ‘Animal Mother’ (Adam Baldwin), ‘Gomer’ (Vincent D’Onofrio), ‘Eightball’ (Dorian Harewood) and ‘Cowboy’ (Arliss Howard), some of the Marine recruits experiencing boot-camp hell under the punishing command of the foul-mouthed Sergeant Hartman (R. Lee Ermy).

Full Metal Jacket was nominated for an Oscar at the 60th Academy Awards for Best Adapted Screenplay for Kubrick, Herr and Hasford.

The 4K remastering was done using a new 4K scan of the original 35mm camera negative at Warner Bros. Motion Picture Imaging, according to the studio. Kubrick’s former personal assistant Leon Vitali worked closely with the team at Warner Bros. during the mastering process.

The Full Metal Jacket Ultra HD Blu-ray Combo Pack features an Ultra HD Blu-ray disc with the feature film in 4K with HDR, a Blu-ray disc with the film in high definition and the previously released special features in high definition, and a digital version of the movie. Fans can also own Full Metal Jacket in 4K Ultra HD via purchase from select digital retailers.

Extras include commentary by Adam Baldwin, Vincent D’Onofrio, R. Lee Ermey and critic/screenwriter Jay Cocks; the featurette Full Metal Jacket: Between Good and Evil; and the theatrical trailer.

‘The Kid’ Shoots to Disc and Digital June 4 From Lionsgate

The Western The Kid rides to Blu-ray (plus digital), DVD, digital and on demand June 4 from Lionsgate.

The new take on the infamous American Old West story of Billy the Kid and Sheriff Pat Garrett stars Ethan Hawke (Training DayBoyhoodThe Magnificent Seven), Dane DeHaan (LincolnThe Place Beyond the PinesLawless), Jake Schur, Leila George and Chris Pratt (Guardians of the Galaxy franchise, “The Avengers” franchise, Jurassic WorldThe Magnificent Seven). Directed by Vincent D’Onofrio (TV’s “Daredevil,” The Magnificent SevenJurassic World) The Kid reunites D’Onofrio and Hawke for the first time since their performance in The Magnificent Seven.

Subscribe HERE to the FREE Media Play News Daily Newsletter!

In the Western, a young boy, Rio (Schur), is forced to go on the run across the American Southwest in a desperate attempt to save his sister (George) from his villainous uncle (Pratt). Along the way, he encounters Sheriff Pat Garrett (Hawke), on the hunt for the infamous outlaw Billy the Kid (DeHaan). Rio finds himself increasingly entwined in the lives of these two legendary figures as the cat-and-mouse game of Billy the Kid’s final year of life plays out.

Bonus features include a making-of featurette.

Death Wish (2018)

BLU-RAY REVIEW: 

Fox;
Action;
Box Office $34.02 million;
$29.99 DVD, $34.99 Blu-ray;
Rated ‘R’ for strong bloody violence, and language throughout.
Stars Bruce Willis, Vincent D’Onofrio, Elisabeth Shue, Dean Norris, Kimberly Elise, Beau Knapp, Camila Morrone.

A knee-jerk reaction to director Eli Roth’s new version of Death Wish in these politically charged times is that it’s some sort of glorification of gun culture and a celebration of vigilante justice. This would be an oversimplification of any intent the film actually has, which would be the psychological examination of what it would take to push a reasonable person to the point of wanting to take the law into their own hands. If anything, the pro-gun crowd is portrayed a bit satirically and even a bit buffoonish.

A remake of the 1974 Charles Bronson film that was based on a 1972 novel by Brian Garfield, the new Death Wish is methodical in its set-up and leans more toward character drama than the kind of intense action one might expect by the casting of Bruce Willis in the vigilante role. It’s an unexpected approach given Roth’s horror credentials, though when the action comes, Roth knows how to ramp it up, even if the middle section of the film turns into a bit of a cartoon.

The psychological elements are pretty straightforward as well. Willis plays Dr. Paul Kersey, whose wife is murdered and daughter left in a coma after an interrupted burglary at their upper-crust residence in the suburbs of Chicago. With the police seemingly unable to make any headway on the case, Paul finds himself heavily weighing the words of his father-in-law, a Texas rancher who tells him that people have to protect what’s theirs and not rely on anyone else.

At one point, Paul discovers an unregistered gun among the possessions of a shot-up thug brought into his hospital, and he uses it to train himself to shoot. Inspired, he begins to patrol the streets to take out criminals, inspiring a wave of less-than-effective copycats and prompting the city’s media, including real-life radio personalities Mancow and Sway to debate the morality of vigilante justice.

Eventually Paul uncovers clues to discovering the gang that murdered his wife, giving him a measure of revenge that was largely missing from the story of the original film.

It also, to a degree, negates Paul’s reasoning for taking the law into his own hands, given that he has to withhold the evidence the police are looking for to crack the case. But that’s a debate for another day.

Roth in his audio commentary points out many clues he subtly layered into the film to hint at what in Paul’s backstory could have led to his decision to take drastic action in dispensing his own brand of justice.

It’s a very good conversational commentary between Roth and producer Roger Birnbaum, two guys who enjoy making movies and have no shortage of things to talk about with this film, from casting to staging to influences and all the themes they were trying to explore.

The Blu-ray also includes six minutes of deleted scenes with optional commentary from the pair. The scenes offer some nice bits of additional emotional context to the main story of the film. The disc also includes six-and-a-half minutes of extended footage from the Mancow and Sway segments filmed for the movie.

There’s also a 12-minute behind-the-scenes featurette. But the most fun extra is a version of the film’s trailer presented in the style of a 1970s grindhouse movie.