Tubi TV Launches ‘Not on Netflix’ Ad Campaign

Ad-supported VOD service Tubi TV Nov. 18 launched a star-filled “not on Netflix” marketing campaign to show case its alternative to subscription streaming video.

Claiming to bring “levity” in the midst of the streaming wars, Tubi  launched of six brand commercials featuring recognizable actors trying to find the cure for subscription fatigue during what at first appears to be a typical therapy session.

The ad spots feature Chris Noth, Carmen Electra, Terrence Howard, Nicole Scherzinger, Robin Thicke and Colton Underwood “discovering” AVOD. They’ve all admitted that they’ve met “someone” new to help alleviate them of their streaming problems: Tubi.

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The ‘Not on Netflix’ campaign features:

Chris Noth feeling guilty about wanting to make a change from his ‘first love’; Carmen Electra analyzing her commitment issues; Terrence Howard struggling to shake off past roles still haunting him; Nicole Scherzinger on avoiding drama; Robin Thicke overcoming everyone wanting a piece of him; The Bachelor’s Colton Underwood exploring something ‘on the side’ — with Cassie encouraging it.

In addition to a coordinated digital, social and CTV launch, billboards will also be appearing in New York and Los Angeles with the URL: www.notonnetflix.com.

As Planet Earth Turns to Streaming Video, ViacomCBS Aims for Pluto (TV)

Prior to Viacom’s re-merger with CBS Corp., the media giant had scant over-the-top video properties. Now with the addition of CBS All Access and Showtime OTT, the company claims about 16 million paying subscription streaming subscribers.

That’s 20% less than the 20 million monthly viewers who stream content for free on Pluto TV — the San Francisco-based ad-supported VOD service Viacom acquired earlier this year for $340 million.

That user tally reflects a 70% year-over-year gain in consumer traction for Pluto and underscores Viacom’s strategic move to compete against Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, Disney+ and other high-profile SVOD services with old-school ad-supported content.

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“Our focus on an investment in Pluto is evident,” Bob Bakish, CEO of ViacomCBS, said on the recent fiscal call. “In Q4 alone, Pluto launched 43 new channels and last month, Pluto Latino added 11 new channels given the platform of total 22 channels with over 4,000 hours of Spanish and Portuguese language programming.”

The opportunity for Pluto TV Latino is significant given the size of the Hispanic population, as well as gaps within the existing programming landscape. As the largest minority market, the group has a combined buying power of $1.5 trillion, according to research from the University of Georgia.

The once-dominant Spanish-language broadcast network, Univision, has been steadily losing viewers for years and has been locked in a battle with Comcast-owned Telemundo for younger, bilingual viewers. Meanwhile, streaming services such as Hulu, Sling, and fuboTV offer Spanish-language content, but the additional cost of these services is leading to “subscription fatigue.”

“There are all sorts of creative programming ideas we can test with the audience that hasn’t been done before,” Tom Ryan, co-founder and CEO of Pluto TV, said. “If they work, we can be nimble and double down on them.”

Indeed, AVOD revenue is projected to more than double between 2018 and 2024, topping $56 billion across 138 countries — including the U.S.

Next year, NBC Universal is launching an ad-supported streaming service dubbed “Peacock,” which joins industry players such Tubi TV, which bowed in 2014 with more than 9,000 movies and television shows, Amazon’s IMDb TV and The Roku Channel, among others.

“The U.S. will more than triple its AVOD revenue total between 2018 and 2024 to $19.23 billion — or 34% of the global total,” said Simon Murray, analyst with Digital TV Research.

Bakish said Viacom would continue to grow Pluto TV distribution globally and on new platforms, which he said would benefit both viewers and business partners.

He said Pluto has not only been a driver to restoring overall Viacom ad sales growth, it’s also been a platform to enable Viacom to “radically” increase the number of clients it does business with.

“In the crowded subscription universe, as consumers become increasingly more value conscious, we strongly believe that having the leading free streaming service in the country and over time, the world is a huge competitive advantage,” Bakish said.

 

AVOD Service Tubi Launches in Australia

AVOD service Tubi will launch in Australia Sept. 1.

Customers there will have access to an initial offering of nearly 7,000 movies and TV series, which will rapidly expand in the near future, according to Tubi. Titles immediately available on the service include 3:10 to Yuma, The Blair Witch Project, Kickboxer and Stranger Than Fiction, with additional titles to be made available over the next six months, including Dirty DancingThe Grudge, Requiem for a Dream, Reservoir Dogs, SawTraffic and Young Guns.

“We’re excited to offer Tubi in Australia, as the first of many launch initiatives to advance our global footprint,” said Tubi CEO Farhad Massoudi in a statement. “Our library size in Australia will expand rapidly in the coming months and eventually grow to our current library size in the U.S. of 15,000 titles — and beyond. We look forward to further activating new audiences who will discover the growing value of free video on demand.”

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Customers in Australia will be able to access Tubi via Telstra TV, Tubi.TV, or through nearly any internet-connected screen including Samsung TVs, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Google Chromecast and Apple iOS, as well as Android tablets and smartphones, according to Tubi. The service will also be available via game consoles, including PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.

Ad-Supported VOD Revenue to Reach $56 Billion by 2024, Driven by U.S.

Ad-supported video-on-demand, the free streaming video alternative to subscription VOD, continues to gain momentum.

New data from Digital TV Research projects AVOD revenue will more than double between 2018 and 2024 topping $56 billion across 138 countries — including notably in the United States. Online TV and video advertising has been considerably boosted in recent years by the rapid growth in mobile advertising, according to DTR.

While AVOD penetration in the Asia Pacific region is well-established, topping $10.73 billion in 2018 with 49% of the global marketshare, the rest of the world is catching up. Despite more than doubling to $25.14 billion by 2024, Asia Pacific’s marketshare will fall to 45%.

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From the $34.42 billion additional revenue to be generated between 2018 and 2024, Asia Pacific will contribute $14.41 billion and North America $14.20 billion. All of the other regions will at least double their totals.

“China is the largest AVOD country — commanding 36% of the 2018 global total, with $7.78 billion,” Simon Murray, principal analyst at Digital TV Research, said in a statement. “Most OTT viewing in China is on mobile phones to AVOD-supported platforms. China will still generate 29% of the global total by 2024 with $16.60 billion.”

Murray said the U.S. will become the AVOD leader by 2023.

Indeed, several large platform domestic launches (i.e. NBC Universal, Sony Crackle) are expected in the near future, in addition to San Francisco-based Tubi TV, which bowed in 2014 with more than 9,000 movies and television shows, Amazon’s IMDb TV (formerly IMDb Freedive) and The Roku Channel, among others.

“The U.S. will more than triple its AVOD revenue total between 2018 and 2024 to $19.23 billion — or 34% of the global total,” Murray said.

Tubi Surpasses 20 Million Monthly Active Users

AVOD movie and television service Tubi announced it has surpassed 20 million monthly active users.

Customers watched more than 94 million hours of content during May, Tubi’s single biggest month of revenue in the company’s history, according to the company.

Tubi’s library has more than 15,000 movies and television series, and more than 44,000 hours of content available free to consumers from more than 200 content partners including major studios such as Warner Bros., NBCUniversal, MGM, Lionsgate, and others.

“Tubi has made remarkable strides in the first half of the year, further demonstrating the vitality of AVOD in an environment fatigued by the amount of subscription video options,” said Farhad Massoudi, CEO of Tubi, in a statement. “Our recent deals this year with NBCUniversal, Lionsgate, Warner Bros., and others resonated very well with our customers, and we’re excited to provide even more premium content this year.”

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Available in the United States and Canada, Tubi can be accessed on more than 25 devices including Roku, Amazon FireTV, Comcast Xfinity, Cox Contour, iOS, Android and others, according to the company.

Tubi AVOD Service Available on Cox

Tubi March 29 announced the launch its ad-supported VOD service on Cox Contour giving the pay-TV operator’s subscribers free access to more than 12,000 movies and television series.

Cox subs are able to watch movies such as Up in the Air starring George Clooney and Anna Kendrick and Rango starring Johnny Depp and Isla Fisher, as well as TV series such as “Xena: Warrior Princess,” “The A-Team,” “Major Dad,” “Dog the Bounty Hunter” and “Alf,” among others

In addition, starting April 1, Contour subs will be able to access first seasons of “The Bachelor” and “The Bachelorette,” “Trista and Ryan’s Wedding Special,” and the co-co nuts fifth season of “Bachelor in Paradise.”

“Our partnership with Cox expands upon our mission to make entertainment accessible to everyone,” Farhad Massoudi, CEO of Tubi, said in a statement. “With the addition of Cox Contour, Tubi will continue to have the widest distribution of any ad-supported streaming service.”

San Francisco-based Tubi claims to be one of the most-watched apps on the world’s largest platforms, including Amazon Fire TV, Roku, and Android, among others.

Tubi’s partnership with Cox Contour marks its second MVPD deal after Comcast Xfinity X1, and remains the only AVOD streaming service with distribution as a standalone app.

Cox Contour’s library of apps also includes Netflix, YouTube, YouTube Kids, iHeartRadio and NPR One, as well as a sports app that shows live stats and scores on the TV screen.

 

 

Tubi TV AVOD Service to Spend $100+ Million on Content in 2019

Tubi TV, the advertising-based video-on-demand service, Jan. 30 announced plans to spend more than $100 million on content in 2019.

The San Francisco-based service currently features a library of more than 12,000 movies and television series from more than 200 content partners, including most major studios.

Launched in 2014, Tubi said viewership increased 430% in 2018 compared to 2017, with December generating nearly as much content streamed as all of 2017.

The company said it turned a profit in the fourth quarter, ended Dec. 31, 2018, with revenue up more than 180% in 2018. More than 1,000 advertisers ran spots on Tubi, including consumer products and automotive advertisers reaching audiences via ads on movies and TV shows.

Late last year, Tubi became the third streaming service to be made available on Comcast’s X1 platform — behind Netflix and YouTube. The service plans to launch beyond the U.S. and Canada, with the first territories expected to be announced this quarter.

“In 2018, Tubi saw tremendous growth as consumers, fatigued by SVOD subscriptions and services, sought alternative entertainment choices,” CEO Farhad Massoudi said in a statement. “We will continue to use profits to make bigger bets on content, enhance the viewing experience, and continue to press ahead into new grounds in what is our core advantage: technology and data.”

 

CES: Speakers Discuss the Growing Pains and Promise of Direct-to-Consumer Entertainment

LAS VEGAS — Speakers discussed the variety and expansion of online services, as well as strategies to cut through the content clutter and engage the online entertainment consumer during the panel “Into the Zeitgeist — The Direct-to-Consumer Entertainment Economy” at CES Jan. 9.

The panel took place at the Variety Entertainment Summit during the Las Vegas show.

The advent of pending services from the Walt Disney Co., WarnerMedia and Apple “certainly makes our lives more interesting,” said Hulu’s Kelly Campbell, adding the question is if they can scale quickly.

Farhad Massoudi, of the AVOD service Tubi, said there was a limit to what average consumers will spend on subscription services and that it was “ludicrous” that average income folks would subscribe to a growing smattering of subscription video-on-demand services. That’s where ad-supported platforms such as Tubi, which sports a movie and TV library much bigger than Netflix, come in, he said.

“Most SVOD services are going to struggle,” he said.

FandangoNow’s Cameron Douglas doesn’t consider these services competitors to the company’s transactional VOD business.

“We’re really agnostic as to what people are consuming and where,” he said.

In fact, they successfully distribute Amazon’s “The Handmaid’s Tale” and would love to have a transactional offering of Netflix’s hit Bird Box.

“We do hope all of the studios, Netflix included, allow us to monetize those products,” he said. “There’s no reason that movie content that starts in the digital space can’t find a home on transactional.”

Whatever the distribution model, engaging the consumer is key, panelists said.

“We always want to super serve the super fans,” said Discovery Networks’ Peter Faricy. Discovery along with the PGA Tour created the Golf TV brand, which underpins a new live and on-demand international video streaming service specifically for golf fans.

Another way to attract consumers is by offering products that serve their needs.

“Consumers want choice, flexibility and control,” Hulu’s Campbell said. To that end, Hulu offers the choice of live, ad-supported and ad-free subscription options.

FandangoNow’s Douglas said the VOD service leverage’s its relationship with online movie ticketing platform Fandango by “taking 60 million Fandango uniques every month” and touting availability of transactional digital movie and TV offerings for home viewing.

“The [transactional] space is growing about 10% each year, and we are tripling that growth,” he said.

The service also attracts consumers with superior content quality, such as 4K UHD titles and — through a deal just announced — Imax content.

YouTube’s Neil Mohan said the online behemoth, which adds 400 hours of content a minute every single day, serves its viewers with recommendations that cater to them.

“The recommendations that we give to you should really speak to you,” he said.

Tubi, too, uses recommendation algorithms to serve its audience, Massoudi said.

The content itself should also engage consumers, said Conde Nast Entertainment’s Oren Katzeff. His company, which he said has some of the most binged shows on Netflix, creates content in a way that makes viewers want to watch more episodes.

He said engaging consumers also requires looking at data to see not just what they want, but when they want it and how they want it.

Ideally, content should build a relationship with consumers.

“From a creation standpoint, how do you create content that people not only want to watch [but to comment on and engage with further],” he said.

YouTube Streaming Ad-Supported Hollywood Movies

YouTube has quietly begun offering catalog studio movies for free on its website, including titles such as Legally Blonde, Rocky IV, Zookeeper and The Terminator, among others.

The ad-supported streams appeared last month alongside new releases promoted to buy or rent on YouTube.com (i.e. Google Play).

“We saw this opportunity based on user demand, beyond just offering paid movies. Can we do ad-supported movies, free to the user?” Rohit Dhawan, director of product management at YouTube, told AdAge. “It also presents a nice opportunity for advertisers.”

Indeed, with most of the titles already cycled through retail channels, including DVD, Blu-ray Disc, transactional VOD and SVOD, marketing the IP through the broadcast TV model online to more than 1 billion users offers incremental revenue opportunities for all parties involved.

With targeted advertising seen as a new way for marketers to reach select demographics, eMarketer estimates YouTube could generate billions in revenue annually from ad-supported movies.

“This is a huge business opportunity,” said Farhad Massoudi, CEO of ad-supported Tubi TV. “There’s a lot of consumer traction and I expect all the major companies will jump in at some point.”

Indeed, to help market the Feb. 9, 2019, theatrical release of The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part, Warner Bros. Pictures and YouTube offered free streaming access to the original Lego Movie on Black Friday embedded in an online ad.

The promotion marked the first time YouTube rolled out a full-length movie within an ad.