‘Mandalorian’ Climbs Past ‘Stranger Things’ to Top of TV Demand Charts

The Disney+ series “The Mandalorian” took over the No. 1 spot on not only Parrot Analytics’ digital originals rankings the week ended Nov. 23, but also the data firm’s overall list of TV series from any platform, including broadcast and cable.

A “digital original” is a multi-episode series in which the most recent season was first made available on a streaming platform such as Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, Hulu or Disney+.

Set in the “Star Wars” universe, “The Mandalorian” tells the story of a bounty hunter who takes a personal interest in his latest job. It is the flagship series of the new Disney+ streaming service, which launched Nov. 12. “The Mandalorian” had climbed to No. 3 on the digital originals charts after the service made available its first two episodes, which introduced a character that quickly became the subject of a popular Internet meme that no doubt influenced the series’ rapid rise to No. 1 after the Nov. 22 release of the third episode.

For the week, “The Mandalorian” registered 100.3 million average daily Demand Expressions, the proprietary metric used by Parrot Analytics to measure global demand for TV content. That was up 151% in expressions compared with the previous week, when it had 39.9 million expressions.

Netflix’s “Stranger Things,” which had been comfortably nestled in the top spot for 21 straight weeks, slid to No. 2, registering 81.2 million expressions, down 20% from the previous week.

DC Universe’s “Titans” dropped to No. 3 on the digital originals chart, with expressions up 24.8% to 71.2 million. The finale of the second season will be available starting Nov. 29.

Netflix’s “The Crown” returned after a two-year hiatus and a new main cast, with all 10 episodes of the third season being available Nov. 17. As a result, the series jumped to No. 4 on the originals chart, from No. 22 a week earlier, as expressions rose 134% to 41.7 million.

Slipping a spot to No. 4 was Hulu’s “Castle Rock,” down 1.6% in expressions to 30.8 million.

Amazon Prime Video’s “The Man in the High Castle” rose to No. 7, from No. 30 the previous week,  with expressions up 73.8% to 28.8 million. The fourth and final season was released Nov. 15.

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The Demand Expressions metric draws from a wide variety of data sources, including video streaming, social media activity, photo sharing, blogging, commenting on fan and critic rating platforms, and downloading and streaming via peer-to-peer protocols and file sharing sites.

Media Play News has teamed with Parrot Analytics to provide readers with a weekly top 10 of the most popular digital original TV series in the United States, based on the firm’s  proprietary metric called Demand Expressions, which measures global demand for TV content through a wide variety of data sources, including video streaming, social media activity, photo sharing, blogging, commenting on fan and critic rating platforms, and downloading and streaming via peer-to-peer protocols and file sharing sites.

‘Chilling Adventures of Sabrina’ Shoots to No. 1 on Digital Originals Chart

Netflix continues to dominate the top digital originals chart with nine entries, including “The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina,” which shot up to No. 1 the week ended Nov. 3 with a 111% gain in Demand Expressions, according to Parrot Analytics.

The reboot – which is much darker than the original, comedic “Sabrina, the Teenage Witch” – debuted at No. 4 the prior week, even though it only became available for viewing on Oct. 26, one day before the tracking period ended.

“Marvel’s Daredevil” slipped to No. 2 on the digital originals chart, after two weeks at No. 1. The Netflix superhero series saw its Demand Expressions drop 19% to 43.8 million, compared to 62.9 million Demand Expressions for “Sabrina.”

Demand Expressions is a proprietary metric used by Parrot Analytics to measure global demand for TV content. The metric draws from a wide variety of data sources, including video streaming, social media activity, photo sharing, blogging, commenting on fan and critic rating platforms, and downloading and streaming via peer-to-peer protocols and file sharing sites.

“Stranger Things,” also from Netflix, remained at No. 3 on the digital originals chart.

A “digital original” is a multi-episode series in which the most recent season was first made available on a streaming platform such as Netflix, Amazon Prime Video or Hulu.

Rounding out the top five are “The Haunting of Hill House,” which slipped to No. 4 from No. 2 after an 11% drop in demand, and “Castlevania,” bowing at No. 5, with a 126% spike in demand.

“Castlevania,” a gothic horror series based on the 1989 Japanese video game Castlevania III: Dracula’s Curse, by Konami, became available on Netflix on Oct. 26. The series centers around Trevor Belmont, who defends the nation of Wallachia from Dracula and his followers.

“House of Cards,” the first Netflix digital original, reappeared on the chart at No. 10. In anticipation of the Nov. 2 launch of Season 6, demand shot up 43%.

Amazon Prime Video’s sole chart entry, “The Man in the High Castle,” slipped to No. 9 from No. 7 the prior week.

Media Play News has teamed with Parrot Analytics to provide readers with a weekly top 10 of the most popular digital original TV series in the United States, based on the firm’s  proprietary metric called Demand Expressions, which measures global demand for TV content through a wide variety of data sources, including video streaming, social media activity, photo sharing, blogging, commenting on fan and critic rating platforms, and downloading and streaming via peer-to-peer protocols and file sharing sites.

 

 

‘Big Mouth,’ ‘Man in the High Castle’ Score Big on Digital Originals Chart

Two new digital originals popped up in the top 10 the week ended Oct. 13, according to Parrot Analytics.

Netflix’s “Big Mouth” took over the top spot from “Stranger Things,” which had been No. 1 for three weeks, with 40.2 million average daily Demand Expressions for the week, up 172% from the prior week.

And Amazon Prime Video’s “The Man in the High Castle” reappeared on the chart at No. 4 with a 65% spike in demand, attributed by Parrot to the debut of Season 3.

Demand Expressions is a proprietary metric used by Parrot Analytics to measure global demand for TV content. The metric draws from a wide variety of data sources, including video streaming, social media activity, photo sharing, blogging, commenting on fan and critic rating platforms, and downloading and streaming via peer-to-peer protocols and file sharing sites.

A “digital original” is described as a multi-episode series in which the most recent season was first made available on a streaming platform such as Netflix, Amazon Prime Video or Hulu.

Demand for “Big Mouth,” an adult animated sitcom centered around a group of middle school students going through puberty, surged due to the release of new episodes that became available for streaming on Oct. 5. The series, created by Nick Kroll, Jennifer Flackett, Mark Levin, and Andrew Goldberg, uses raunchy humor to discuss sensitive and controversial issues. One new episode got plenty of press for examining Planned Parenthood and talking up all the other services it offers besides abortion.

Demand for “The Man in the High Castle” also was fueled by the Oct. 5 “drop” of Season 3, consisting of 10 episodes. The new season, according to Parrot, is “a fully realized post-WWII dystopian drama honoring Philip K. Dick’s big theme. … We have seen high fan engagement for this title not at least due to the incredible cinematographer and director Ernest Dickerson.”

Back in July, at San Diego Comic-Con, Amazon announced that the series had been renewed for a fourth season.

Elsewhere on the chart, “Stranger Things” finished the week at No. 2, with an 11% drop in demand. “Marvel’s Daredevil” slipped a spot to No. 3, but demand was up slightly (4%) as audience anticipation builds for Season 3, Parrot Analytics says.

Rounding out the top five was “Ozark,” the “Breaking Bad”-like Netflix drama about a family forced to move its money-laundering operation to a resort in the Ozark mountains to placate a violent drug cartel. The series rose up a notch as demand increased a modest 6% on word that Netflix has commissioned Season 3.

Media Play News has teamed with Parrot Analytics to provide readers with a weekly top 10 of the most popular digital original TV series in the United States, based on the firm’s  proprietary metric called Demand Expressions, which measures global demand for TV content through a wide variety of data sources, including video streaming, social media activity, photo sharing, blogging, commenting on fan and critic rating platforms, and downloading and streaming via peer-to-peer protocols and file sharing sites.

Amazon Prime Video Viewership Revealed

Amazon Prime Video reportedly generated 26 million initial viewers for original programs in early 2017, including 5 million viewers for top shows such as “The Man in the High Castle,” “Transparent,” “Mozart in the Jungle,” and ‘The Grand Tour.”

Subscription streaming video heavyweights Netflix and Amazon Prime Video have staunchly refused to reveal viewership (or ratings) for their ad-free original programs, citing lack of required advertiser justification. It’s a stance that irritates ad-supported TV broadcasters beholden to live-or-die ratings.

Now, internal documents obtained by Reuters reveal in part why original programing is driving Netflix and Amazon to spend $8 billion and $5 billion, respectively, on programing in 2018: New subscribers. It’s growth that drives revenue – and that’s what Wall Street loves.

With Prime Video a free component of Amazon’s $99 annual Prime free two-day shipping membership program, original episodic programs and movies drive subscriber growth, which in turn drives growth of other items on Amazon – including movies.

Unlike Netflix, which reveals (if not champions) subscriber data, Amazon refuses to disclose Prime membership data, which was estimated to top 54 million in the United States at the end of 2015, according to a Consumer Intelligence Research Partners survey.

In a separate 2016 survey from “CutCableToday” of 380 Prime members, 40% said they rented or bought movies not available on Prime Video from Amazon Instant Video on a monthly basis. The survey also found that 20% of Prime members don’t use Prime Video.

“When we win a Golden Globe, it helps us sell more shoes,” Amazon founder/CEO Jeff Bezos told a 2016 tech confab. It’s an outlook CFO Brian Olsavsky drones on monotonously in Amazon’s conference calls.

Reuters reported that “High Castle,” which is an adaption of Philip Dick’s 1962 alternate historical fiction showcasing Axis powers Germany, Japan and Italy having won World War II, cost $72 million in first season production and marketing.

It reportedly generated 1.15 million new Prime subscribers, or about $63 in subscriber acquisition costs – 36% below the annual Prime membership fee.