Shout! Factory Bringing William Shatner’s ‘Captains Collection’ to Blu-ray

Shout! Factory Oct. 20 will release The Captains Collection, bringing together for the first time on Blu-ray four documentaries by William Shatner that take fans behind the scenes of the “Star Trek” franchise. The documentaries will also be available for digital purchase.

The documentaries, which were previously released on DVD, include 2011’s The Captains, 2012’s Get a Life!, 2013’s The Captains Close Up, and 2014’s Chaos on the Bridge: The Untold Story Behind Trek’s Next Generation.

In The Captains, Shatner, who famously starred as Capt. James T. Kirk on the original “Star Trek,” interviews five other performers who played the headlining captains on various “Star Trek” shows and movies up to that point: Patrick Stewart of “Star Trek: The Next Generation,” Avery Brooks of “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine,” Kate Mulgrew of “Star Trek: Voyager,” Scott Bakula of “Star Trek: Enterprise,” and Chris Pine, who plays a younger alternate reality Kirk in the 2009 Star Trek movie and its sequels.

The Captains Close Up is a five-episode miniseries featuring expanded interviews from The Captains.

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In Get a Life!, Shatner explores “Star Trek” fandom and his own influence on it. The title is based on a famous “Saturday Night Live” sketch in which Shatner jokingly implores the crowd at a “Star Trek” convention to stop bothering him with mundane questions about the series and “get a life.”

Chaos on the Bridge recounts the story of making “Star Trek: The Next Generation,” featuring interviews with several of its creators and producers.

The Captains Collection will be widely as a standard four-disc set. Extras include trailers, additional stories, “The Making of the Captains” featurette, and a “Ponder The Mystery” music video.

The ShoutFactory.com store is also offering an exclusive special-edition version with a fifth disc containing the 2009 documentary William Shatner’s Gonzo Ballet for the first time on home video.

William Shatner’s Gonzo Ballet chronicles a ballet called “Common People” that was set to the music of a 2004 album called Has Been by William Shatner and Ben Folds. “Common People” was one of the songs on the album and is a cover of a song from the 1995 Different Class album by the band Pulp.

The Shout! Exclusive bonus disc also offers an additional hour-and-a-half of interviews, including bonus episode “Still Kicking: A Conversation Between William Shatner and Christopher Plummer.” Extended interviews from The Captains include Walter Koenig, Grace Lee Whitney, Gary Lockwood and Sally Kellerman from the original series. The disc also includes extended interviews from Chaos on the Bridge, including former CBS president Les Moonves.

The special-edition Blu-ray is limited to a run of 2,000 copies.

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The ShoutFactory.com store also has an exclusive bundle, limited to 1,000 units, pairing the special-edition Blu-ray with the Has Been album on vinyl — a  variant featuring a green, yellow and black splatter design.

James Cameron’s Story of Science-Fiction

DVD REVIEW: 

Street Date 7/28/20;
RLJ;
Documentary;
$34.97 DVD or Blu-ray;
Not Rated.
Featuring James Cameron, George Lucas, Steven Spielberg, Christopher Nolan, Ridley Scott.

This six-episode documentary series hosted by filmmaker James Cameron should prove a fascinating viewing experience for any fan of the title genre, primarily due to the high-caliber talent on display sharing their insights on the topic.

The series is structured with each episode taking on a different topic within the genre: “Alien Life,” “Space Exploration,” “Monsters,” “Dark Futures,” “Intelligent Machines” and “Time Travel.” They run a shade over 40 minutes each on disc, long enough to fill an hour-long time slot when commercials are added in (the series originally aired on AMC in 2018).

Much of the series follows a typical documentary format tracing the history of the episode’s topic, with analysis from various talking heads in the form of critics, authors, actors and filmmakers. Particular emphasis is placed on the various social, political and philosophical underpinnings of various sci-fi stories throughout history. One primary thesis that arises is the notion that science-fiction isn’t about predicting the future, it’s about choosing our future — an observation that demonstrates why there’s still considerable value to older sci-fi tales that might otherwise seem outdated.

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But the heart of the program involves Cameron sitting for a series of one-on-one interviews with other high-profile directors as they discuss each others work (with no shortage of praise for one another, as could be expected). The stories the directors tell range from the oft-repeated tales that every fan knows, to interesting insights into what guided certain filmmaking decisions, such as how Steven Spielberg adapted much of his childhood into Close Encounters and E.T.

The discussion with George Lucas raises some eyebrows during the A.I. episode, when Cameron says so many movies depict the machines as bad guys, leading to Lucas stating that’s why he decided to depict robots as the good guys in “Star Wars” — the pair apparently sidestepping the fact that Lucas made three “Star Wars” films in which the good guys fought entire armies of evil robots.

Still, the conversations are fun to watch and the various TV and movie clips offer enough nostalgia that any viewer should find something to like.

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The bonus section includes extended interviews with Spielberg, Lucas, Ridley Scott, Christopher Nolan, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Will Smith and Sigourney Weaver. These run about three to four minutes each.

New ‘Star Trek: Prodigy’ Animated Series Announced for Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon and CBS Television Studios July 23 announced a new animated series called “Star Trek: Prodigy” to debut in 2021. The title and logo were revealed during an online Comic-Con@Home panel.

The CG-animated series will air exclusively on Nickelodeon and follows a group of lawless teens who discover a derelict Starfleet ship and use it to search for adventure, meaning and salvation.

The series is being developed by Emmy winners Kevin and Dan Hageman (“Trollhunters” and “Ninjago”) and overseen for Nickelodeon by Ramsey Naito, EVP of animation production and development at Nickelodeon.

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The series will be from CBS’s Eye Animation Productions, CBS Television Studios’ new animation arm; production company Secret Hideout, which oversees the “Trek” franchise; and Roddenberry Entertainment. Alex Kurtzman, Heather Kadin, Katie Krentz, Rod Roddenberry and Trevor Roth will serve as executive producers alongside Kevin and Dan Hageman. Aaron Baiers will serve as a co-executive producer.

“Star Trek: Prodigy” is being billed as the first “Trek” series aimed at younger audiences for Nickelodeon. It will be the third animated “Star Trek” series, following the 1973-74 FIlmation series featuring the cast of the original series, and “Star Trek: Lower Decks,” which arrives on the CBS All Access Streaming Service Aug. 6.

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Current CBS All Access live-action series include “Star Trek: Discovery” and “Star Trek: Picard.” Series in development for the streaming service include the Capt. Pike spinoff “Star Trek: Strange New Worlds,” as well as a series based on Section 31, the enigmatic Starfleet intelligence service.

First Season of ‘Star Trek: Picard’ on Disc Oct. 6

CBS and Paramount Home Entertainment will release Star Trek: Picard — Season One on Blu-ray and DVD Oct. 6.

Patrick Stewart reprises his role as Capt. Jean-Luc Picard from “Star Trek: The Next Generation” on the CBS All Access original series. Set 30 years after “Next Generation,” the new show finds Picard’s retirement disturbed by a young woman (Isa Briones) who seeks his help after being attacked by Romulans as part of a conspiracy involving androids and artificial intelligence.

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‘Star Trek’ Beaming to Comic-Con@Home

CBS All Access and CBS Television Studios have announced a “Star Trek” Universe block of panel programming during Comic-Con@Home to take place at 10 a.m. Thursday, July 23.

Deadline senior editor Dominic Patten will moderate the panels with an introduction and discussion with Secret Hideout executive producers Alex Kurtzman and Heather Kadin.

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Back-to-back sessions will feature the cast of “Star Trek: Discovery” performing a table read of the second-season finale. Cast members slated to appear include Sonequa Martin-Green (Commander Michael Burnham), Michelle Yeoh (Philippa Georgiou), Doug Jones (Commander Saru), Anthony Rapp (Lt. Commander Paul Stamets), Mary Wiseman (Ensign Sylvia Tilly), Wilson Cruz (Dr. Hugh Culber), Mary Chieffo (L’Rell), Tig Notaro (Commander Jett Reno), Alan Van Sprang (Captain Leland), Jayne Brook (Admiral Katrina Cornwall), and the Discovery Bridge crew Emily Coutts (Lt. Detmer), Oyin Oladejo (Lt. J.G. Owosekun), Patrick Kwok-Choon (Lt. Rhys), Ronnie Rowe Jr. (Lt. J.G. Bryce), Sara Mitich (Lt. Nilsson), and upcoming “Star Trek: Strange New Worlds” stars Anson Mount (Captain Christopher Pike), Rebecca Romijn (Number One) and Ethan Peck (Spock), alongside “Discovery” executive producer and co-showrunner Michelle Paradise and executive producer Olatunde Osunsanmi, who also directed the season-two finale. Act one of the table read will be shown at Comic-Con@Home followed by a brief cast Q&A.

Mike McMahan, creator, showrunner and executive producer of the upcoming animated series “Star Trek: Lower Decks,” which premieres on CBS All Access Thursday, Aug. 6, will debut an exclusive extended first look from the premiere episode. McMahan also moderates a discussion with the Starfleet crew residing in the “lower decks” of the U.S.S. Cerritos, including Ensign Beckett Mariner, voiced by Tawny Newsome, Ensign Brad Boimler, voiced by Jack Quaid, Ensign Tendi, voiced by Noël Wells, and Ensign Rutherford, voiced by Eugene Cordero, as well as the ship’s bridge crew including Captain Carol Freeman, voiced by Dawnn Lewis, Commander Jack Ransom, voiced by Jerry O’Connell, Lieutenant Shaxs, voiced by Fred Tatasciore, and Doctor T’Ana, voiced by Gillian Vigman.

Finally, Patrick Stewart and the cast of “Star Trek: Picard” will discuss the show’s first season. Among those also slated to appear are Alison Pill (Dr. Agnes Jurati), Isa Briones (Dahj/Soji), Evan Evagora (Elnor), Michelle Hurd (Raffi Musiker), Santiago Cabrera (Cristobal Rios), Brent Spiner (Data/Dr. Soong), Jonathan Del Arco (Hugh), Jonathan Frakes (William Riker), Jeri Ryan (Seven of Nine) and Marina Sirtis (Deanna Troi).

CBS All Access Orders ‘Star Trek’ Spinoff Focused on Capt. Pike’s Enterprise

The CBS All Access streaming service May 15 announced it has ordered “Star Trek: Strange New Worlds,” a new series focused on Capt. Pike’s tenure as commander of the starship Enterprise 10 years before Capt. Kirk.

The series will star Anson Mount as Pike, Rebecca Romijn as first officer Number One, and Ethan Peck as science officer Lt. Spock. The trio first played the characters in the second season of CBS All Access’ “Star Trek: Discovery” and reprised the roles in a number of “Short Treks” episodes.

Though fan reaction to “Discovery” has been mixed, the performances of Mount, Romijn and Peck as the legacy characters has been widely praised, leading to calls for them to receive their own show.

“When we said we heard the fans’ outpouring of love for Pike, Number One and Spock when they boarded ‘Star Trek: Discovery’ last season, we meant it,” executive producer Alex Kurtzman said in a statement. “These iconic characters have a deep history in Star Trek canon, yet so much of their stories have yet to be told.”

The characters themselves date back to the original “Star Trek” pilot episode, “The Cage,” that was produced in 1964. Series creator Gene Roddenberry’s first attempt to sell the science-fiction series was famously rejected by NBC executives, though they were impressed enough by the concept to ask for a second pilot, which revamped the formula by replacing almost the entire cast, keeping only the alien Spock character, played by Leonard Nimoy, and introducing Capt. Kirk as played by William Shatner. Footage from the original pilot was eventually recycled for a two-part episode of the original “Star Trek” series that introduced Pike as Spock’s former captain.

“Strange New Worlds” could thus be seen in some regards as the “Star Trek” series that Roddenberry had originally envisioned in the mid-1960s. The title comes from the famous mission creed of the U.S.S. Enterprise to “explore strange new worlds” and “seek out new life and new civilizations,” with the show’s creators promising a series that returns “Star Trek” to its roots of a starship exploring a vast unknown galaxy.

“Fans fell in love with Anson Mount, Rebecca Romijn and Ethan Peck’s portrayals of these iconic characters when they were first introduced on ‘Star Trek: Discovery’ last season,” Julie McNamara, EVP and head of programming at CBS All Access, said in a statement. “This new series will be a perfect complement to the franchise, bringing a whole new perspective and series of adventures to ‘Star Trek.’”

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The series premiere was written by Akiva Goldsman with a story by Goldsman, Kurtzman, and Jenny Lumet. Goldsman, Kurtzman, and Lumet will serve as executive producers in addition to Henry Alonso Myers, Heather Kadin, Rod Roddenberry and Trevor Roth.

“With Akiva and Henry at the helm, the Enterprise, its crew, and its fans are in for an extraordinary journey to new frontiers in the Star Trek universe,” Kurtzman said.

Pike was previously played by Jeffrey Hunter in “The Cage,” with actor Sean Kenney in heavy makeup doubling for Hunter in new sequences shot for the pilot footage’s use in the original series. Bruce Greenwood played Pike in J.J. Abrams’ 2009 reboot movie and its 2013 sequel (both co-written by Kurtzman). Number One was previously played by “Trek” mainstay (and later Gene Roddenberry’s wife) Majel Barrett in “The Cage.”

In addition to “Star Trek: Discovery,” which is expected to premiere its third season later this year, CBS All Access is also home to “Star Trek: Picard,” a “Star Trek: The Next Generation” sequel that presented its first season earlier this year, and “Short Treks,” a series of 15- to 20-minute short films based on elements from the franchise. CBS All Access will also present the animated series “Star Trek: Lower Decks.”

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“Strange New Worlds” will be the eighth live-action “Star Trek” series in the history of the franchise. The series will be produced by CBS Television Studios, Secret Hideout and Roddenberry Entertainment. Aaron Baiers, Akela Cooper, and Davy Perez will serve as co-executive producers. Goldsman will remain an executive producer and a member of the creative team on “Star Trek: Picard” as well.

A premiere date for “Strange New Worlds” was not announced.

Paramount Presenting Online Screenings of Classic Catalog With Guest Hosts

Paramount is presenting a series of virtual screenings that will be streamed online at CYA.LIVE, allowing viewers to watch and interact via text and video with other fans, as well as special guest hosts, for $1.99 per screening.

The first event will be a 25th anniversary screening of the Chris Farley comedy Tommy Boy hosted by the film’s director, Peter Segal (Get Smart50 First DatesNaked Gun 33 1/3: The Final Insult). The event will take place April 18 at 5 p.m. PST.

At the same time April 25, Paramount will screen Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan along with the hosts of the “Inglorious Treksperts” podcast, Mark A. Altman and Daren Dochterman. Altman is a television and motion picture writer/producer/director, as well as the author of the book The 50 Year Mission: The Complete Uncensored, Oral History of Star Trek. Dochterman has worked in the entertainment industry for more than 30 years and has more than 80 film and television credits. He is known for his work as visual effects supervisor on the director’s edition of Star Trek: The Motion Picture.

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The third event will feature a screening of director Blake Edwards’ classic Breakfast at Tiffany’s May 2 at 5 p.m. PST, just two days prior to Audrey Hepburn’s birthday on May 4. The screening will be hosted by Andrea Kalas, the head of the Paramount Pictures Archives.

Playing in the Fanboy Sandbox

The home video availability of Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker  is sure to rekindle discussions over the legacy of the “Star Wars” franchise and the latest film’s contribution to it.

Star Wars fans mostly agree that Rise of Skywalker is a disappointing final chapter of the saga, but are embroiled in an online debate over which filmmaker is most responsible for “messing up” what has been termed “Disney’s trilogy.”

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

Fans of J.J. Abrams will say that Rian Johnson’s The Last Jedi deviated from the storylines set up in The Force Awakens, and that Abrams was merely doing the best he could with Rise of Skywalker. Johnson’s defenders will point out that Force Awakens was a superficial copy of better “Star Wars” movies, and Last Jedi at least tried to offer some depth to the new trilogy while simply extrapolating what was set up in Force Awakens. Last Jedi haters complain the film veers too much toward political messaging, and so forth. But it’s generally agreed upon that the trilogy as a whole suffers from a lack of planning a three-film storyline from the beginning of the production process. And this lack of planning has had a spillover effect on tie-in materials such as novels, comic books and reference books that suffer in quality for having to both explain the story gaps apparent in the new films, and exist with the new canon established therein.

Even the divisive qualities of the prequel trilogy haven’t sparked such animosity among the fanbase. So how did it come to this?

Certainly, the way the Internet tends to present some users with the false perception of expertise in any field of study has been a major contributing factor. But that’s true with just about any disagreement on anything these days. When it comes to the consideration of pop culture and fiction, there is definitely something deeper at play.

The reason that “Star Wars” endeared so many among the ranks of Generation X in the 1980s was the way it sparked our imaginations. Whether it was younger kids carrying on the battles between the Rebellion and the Empire on the playground, or older viewers pursuing careers in filmmaking and art, the franchise had an undeniable, tangible impact on the storytelling impulse of a generation.

There, in the backyard, we could swing our toy lightsabers to re-create epic moments of sacrifice; at the playground, we could chase each other with light-up blasters in pursuit of glory; in the sandbox, we could use our “Star Wars” action figures to continue the adventures of the characters we idolized on screen.

The unifying force through it all was the understanding that it was George Lucas’ story that was being told. He was the storyteller, and we were buying those action figures to play in his world. Even as some fans were disappointed by the prequels, there was still a grudging tolerance of them because Lucas had made them. Fans were willing to let him tell his story, absorb the lessons as they came, and react appropriately. And with many fans, they began to see the franchise in the new light of older eyes.

But the films of the Disney era are the first to be made by the generation influenced by the storyteller, not the storyteller himself.

As far as the fans were concerned, they had just as much a stake in the ongoing story as the likes of J.J. Abrams and Rian Johnson, who for all intents and purposes were just playing in the sandbox too. If they didn’t create the thing, then why should their interpretation of the stories be any more valid than any fan who had spent decades analyzing the franchise?

This potential perception of legitimacy makes it a smart move for any franchise to carry over creative forces from one regime to the next. So it’s not just J.J. Abrams working on The Force Awakens, but Lawrence Kasdan, one of the primary screenwriters Lucas worked with in creating the original trilogy. Or why the name of Dave Filoni, who worked with Lucas on the “Clone Wars” animated series, carries a lot of clout with fans.

Without the air of legitimacy in the fans’ eyes, subsequent adventures might seem like shallow re-creations of what came before.

Disney’s sequel trilogy itself offers a fitting metaphor for this phenomenon. Its villains, the First Order, come across as posers in their efforts to re-create the Galactic Empire, a generation of children seeking to emulate what their parents did, not unlike the way Abrams was just the templates of the earlier films without much regard to the lessons of them.

Johnson’s The Last Jedi, to its credit, pushes back on this a bit, allowing the characters to ruminate about the struggles of carrying on the legacy of the previous generation while recognizing the role their stories have in inspiring those who would come after them (symbolized quite literally at the end with a scene of kids on an alien planet playing with their own makeshift ‘Star Wars’ figures).

It’s Filoni, and even Jon Favreau to an extent, who are hailed by fans as the true heir to the “Star Wars” storytelling legacy, rather than the likes of Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy or Abrams or Johnson, who are more prone to complaints of appropriating the saga for their own purposes. Hence, “The Mandalorian” served as something of a calming salve fans could unite behind.

Even such a respite, however, has done little to stop the kind of playground bickering we’ve seen from fans online when considering the movies, as if reduced to 10-year-olds arguing over their action figures by shouting “you’re doing it wrong!” Only the Internet lets them shout this at the studio itself.

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But the Internet and the wide dissemination of information even down to the flimsiest of rumor has added a new wrinkle to the fans’ relationships with their favorite franchises. Instead of just going to see the new movie every few years, they now can follow nearly all aspects of the production, from casting news, to leaked photos from shooting locations, to potential in-fighting between producers and directors. The race to post spoilers is so intense that it seems some fans aren’t even going to the movies anymore to enjoy the films, but just to confirm that what they didn’t like in the production rumors they heard actually came to pass. And when the story being told doesn’t meet their approval, they will complain until the studio caves in, or they denounce the franchise as having lost its way, putting so much stock into fictional characters as if they don’t have anything else to fixate on.

And thus, we are left with a caricature of the modern fan who wants both to have the story told to them while also dictating the direction of that story.

It’s not unlike the phenomenon that impacted professional wrestling in the 1990s, when the Internet let fans in on all the behind-the-scenes details that flew in the face of the in-ring storylines, and rather than be turned off by the idea that wrestling was “fake” only became more enamored with it. As promotions began blurring the lines between their backstage and storyline realities, the fans who had been known in the industry as “marks” because they were meant to believe the in-ring story (generally referred to as “kayfabe,” a term that encompasses the fiction of the wrestlers’ characters), thus took on a new title, the “smart mark,” or “smark” — the fan who appreciates the in-ring performance as an exhibition representing the more complex realities of locker-room politics.

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Another venerable franchise continuation being torn apart by the fan base lately is the CBS All Access revival of “Star Trek.”

Thus far, the new shows include “Star Trek: Discovery,” a prequel to the original 1960s series, and “Star Trek: Picard,” a sequel to “Star Trek: The Next Generation.” There are also a series of tie-in short films called “Short Treks” that expand upon the canon of the new Trek era.

While the shows exhibit high production values and dazzling visual effects, response from longtime “Trek” fans to these new shows has been overwhelmingly negative. “Discovery introduced so many bizarre plot elements right off the bat that it was hard to reconcile the show existing in the same timeline as the other “Trek” shows. It then spent its second season walking back all its high-concept ideas in an attempt to better conform to established canon — but the show’s attempt at self-negation makes it seem largely pointless. About the only aspect of the two seasons fans reacted positively to was the addition of Anson Mount as Capt. Pike, reintroducing the character from the 1960s show’s original unused pilot episode.

“Star Trek: Picard”

“Picard” at least started with some sense of hope, anchored by the assured presence of Patrick Stewart returning to the title role. Yet the story-arc of the 10-episode first season quickly began to spiral out of control with slow pacing, poor character development, disparate story threads and a muddled attempt to add to established “Trek” mythology.

Despite the high budgets and production values, these shows just aren’t that good on their own, never mind how they’re supposed to fit in the franchise (though on this latter point, most fans agree they don’t fit very well).

Tonally, these shows stem from Abrams’ 2009 Star Trek reboot movie, an ill-conceived attempt to turn “Star Trek” into “Star Wars” simply to match Abrams’ own proclivities toward science-fiction. Much like Abrams’ “Star Wars” efforts, the reboot films were a shallow re-creation of established “Trek” lore and fizzled out once they squandered the audiences’ nostalgia for the property.

The new stewards of the brand who emerged from the Abrams films, such as Alex Kurtzman, aren’t even copying what “Star Trek” has done before as much as they are borrowing from other sci-fi franchises. The “Discovery” A.I. gone rogue plot smacks of “The Terminator.” And “Picard” bears similarities to the likes of “Blade Runner,” “Battlestar Galactica.” “Mass Effect” and even “Game of Thrones.” These connections are well documented on YouTube.

It is just another prime example of the gulf between audience expectation for a favored franchise, and the ability for new producers to deliver when they aren’t tied to the creative teams that gave life to the franchise to begin with.

The “TNG”-era shows of the 1990s, themselves viewed skeptically at first by fans of the original series, at least had executive producer Rick Berman, who worked with “Trek” creator Gene Roddenberry on formulating the philosophies of the new shows, and worked to maintain them after Roddenberry died in 1991.

At the very least, in the absence of a connective creative presence, fans at least want to think the new shepherds of their favorite franchises are just as much fans as they are. Part of the problem with response to Johnson’s Last Jedi is that it exposed a rift in the fanbase about the interpretation of the “Star Wars” mythology (and Rise of Skywalker’s attempt to placate once set of fans over the other didn’t do anyone any favors).

“Star Trek,” it seems, has had the opposite problem, with new writers and producers coming in claiming to be fans and yet demonstrating a serious ignorance of the sandbox in which they’re supposed to be playing, not so much from an interpretative point of view, but just details of the canon that should have some impact on the new stories.

Unlike the kind of pass-the-baton storytelling fans didn’t like about the new “Star Wars,” the new “Star Trek” seems to have too many runners. The abundance of creative minds, very few of which having actually worked on “Star Trek” before, and some of which have hardly worked on anything good before, just leads to muddled story arcs, resulting in several attempts to retooling the show to respond to poor feedback and backlash.

“Star Trek: Picard”

“Picard” comes off as a bizarre appropriation of canon, excising what would be appropriate and fan-appreciated references to specific, relevant story points, in exchange for vague generalities about how established characters progressed from where we last saw them to where they are on this show.

Nostalgia, it seems, is the only thing keeping “Picard” afloat, but it’s hard to say how long that will last.

Without a course correction to deliver the type of “Star Trek” fans can enjoy again on a consistent basis, these new shows might end up tipping the scales the other way, enticing fans to tune in simply out of sheer morbid curiosity to see how bad it can get, almost to the point of wanting something to complain about if only to appreciate the earlier shows more (not unlike how the “Star Wars” prequels have earned a bit more appreciation from fans disenchanted by Disney’s sequels).

The ironic twist in all this, of course, is how the long (and overstated) rivalry between “Star Wars” and “Star Trek” fans would find itself defused by J.J. Abrams, uniting them over a shared distaste for his efforts to restart both their beloved franchises.

‘Star Trek: Short Treks’ Collection on Blu-ray June 2

CBS Home Entertainment and Paramount Home Entertainment will release Star Trek: Short Treks on Blu-ray Disc and DVD June 2.

Created for and originally presented on the CBS All Access streaming service, “Short Treks” are a spinoff of “Star Trek: Discovery” that present 10- to 15-minute stories set in the “Star Trek” universe.

The Blu-ray and DVD collection gathers nine “Short Treks.” The first season, produced between “Discovery” season one and season two, includes “Runaway,” in which Tilly bonds with a stowaway on Discovery; “Calypso,” set in the far future when a drifter encounters an abandoned Discovery; “The Brightest Star,” which delves into the backstory of Saru; and “The Escape Artist,” a standalone adventure featuring con-artist Harry Mudd.

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The second batch of shorts includes three tales about Capt. Pike and the U.S.S. Enterprise — “Q&A,” “The Trouble With Edward” and “Ask Not” — and two animated shorts, “Ephraim & Dot” and “The Girl Who Made the Stars.”

The cast includes Anson Mount as Pike, Ethan Peck as Spock, Rebecca Romijn as Number One, Rainn Wilson as Mudd, Mary Wiseman as Tilly, Doug Jones as Saru, and Aldis Hodge as Craft.

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The set includes more than 50 minutes of bonus material, including a featurette about the making of “Short Treks”; audio commentaries for “Runaway” and “Ask Not”; “Coming of Age,” a behind-the-scenes look at “Runaway”; “Shall We Dance,” a look at “Calypso”; “First Contact: Kaminar,” a look at “The Brightest Star”; “Covered in Mudd,” about “The Escape Artist”; “Engisn Spock’s First Day,” a look at “Q&A”; “Here Comes Tribble,” a deep dive “The Trouble With Edward”; “Score!,” a behind-the-curtain discussion with composer Michael Giacchino about “Ephraim and Dot”; and “Bedtime Stories,” about the animated “The Girl Who Made the Stars.”

 

Season 2 of ‘Star Trek: Discovery’ Beams to DVD and Blu-ray Nov. 12

Paramount Home Entertainment and CBS Home Entertainment will release Star Trek: Discovery — Season Two on Blu-ray and DVD Nov. 12.

The four-disc set will include all 14 episodes of the second season of the CBS All Access original series, plus more than two hours of bonus material.

The season finds the U.S.S. Discovery joining forces with Capt. Pike (Anson Mount) of the U.S.S. Enterprise on a mission to investigate seven mysterious signals across the galaxy apparently created by the mysterious Red Angel, a being associated with the disappearance of Spock (Ethan Peck), the adopted brother of Commander Michael Burnham (Sonequa Martin-Green). The cast also includes Doug Jones, Anthony Rapp, Mary Wiseman, Shazad Latif, Wilson Cruz, Mary Chieffo, Tig Notaro, Rebecca Romijn and Michelle Yeoh. 

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The Blu-ray and DVD will also include two “Short Treks” episodes related to the season: “Runaway” and “The Brightest Star.”

Other extras include deleted scenes, a gag reel and commentaries on the episodes “Brother,” “New Eden,” “Through the Valley of Shadows” and “Such Sweet Sorrow, Part 2.” 

Featurettes offered on the discs include:

  • “Enter the Enterprise” — a look at re-created the iconic “Star Trek” starship;
  • “Putting it Together” — about the creation of the season finale;
  • “The Red Angel” — a behind-the-scenes look at one of the the season’s major plot elements;
  • “Designing Discovery: Season Two” — a look at the locations and spaces created for the second season;
  • “Prop Me Up: Season Two” — propmaster Mario Moreira shows off the show’s props.
  • “Dress for Success: Season Two” — a look at the costume design;
  • “Creature Comforts: Season Two” — producers, craftsmen and actors discuss the design process, the implementation and the performance required to bring characters to life. Includes a discussion with makeup artist James McKinnon;
  • “Creating Space” — showing off the visual effects process;
  • “Star Trek: Discovery — The Voyage of Season Two” — a recap of the season.

 

Internationally, the Blu-ray and DVD sets will be released Nov. 18 in the U.K., Nov. 19 in Italy, Nov. 21 in Germany, Nov. 22 in Spain, Nov. 25 in the Nordics, Nov. 27 in Benelux, Nov. 28 in Denmark and Dec. 4 in France. Japan and Australia release dates are pending.