Universal Teams With AFI to Offer Free Digital Rentals of Spike Lee’s ‘Do the Right Thing’

Universal Pictures and the American Film Institute (AFI) June 22 announced they partnering to offer free digital rentals of Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing, a 1989 film centered on racial tensions in a Brooklyn neighborhood that ultimately lead to violence and death.

Do the Right Thing, an AFI Movie Club selection, will be available for free viewing from June 22 through June 29 through digital retailers Amazon, Apple, Charter, Comcast, Cox, Dish, DirecTV, FandangoNow, Google, Microsoft, Redbox, Sony, Verizon and Vudu.

Lee will join the AFI Movie Club for a live conversation June 25 beginning at 5 p.m. PT on the AFI YouTube channel.

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“AFI Movie Club’s global reach has inspired the need for more thoughtful discussions about films that have shaped our culture,” said Bob Gazzale, president and CEO. “Do the Right Thing is a timeless and timely classic, and Spike Lee has forever proven himself the voice for change that we need now more than ever. We would like to thank our partners at Universal for their essential support in educating and inspiring audiences around the world.”

Do the Right Thing was nominated for two Academy Awards, including a Best Original Screenplay nod for Lee and a Best Supporting Actor nomination for Danny Aiello. The film also received four Golden Globe nominations and a Palme d’Or nomination. AFI ranked it as one of the 100 Greatest Films of All Time.

Launched on March 31, AFI Movie Club’s first selection was The Wizard of Oz. Subsequent selections have included Ali, Black Panther, Casablanca, Erin Brockovich, Gilda, Jurassic Park, Just Mercy, Lost in Translation, Milk, Nine to Five, North by Northwest, The Sound of Music, Straight Outta ComptonWhen Harry Met Sally and Wonder Woman.

Netflix Bows ‘Black Lives Matter’-Themed Content Collection

Netflix has again taken the lead on a social issue. The platform June 10 announced the launch of a new content category focusing on social justice and Black Lives Matter. The category includes 45 movies, TV shows and documentaries.

Content includes Spike Lee’s Da 5 Bloods (debuting June 12); Ava DuVernay’s 13th and When They See Us and Mudbound; TV shows “Orange Is the New Black”; “Dear White People”; and Barry Jenkins’ Oscar-winning Moonlight, among others.

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“When we say ‘Black Lives Matter,’ we also mean ‘Black storytelling matters,’” Netflix said on a social media post. “With an understanding that our commitment to true, systemic change will take time — we’re starting by highlighting powerful and complex narratives about the black experience.”

Netflix is no stranger to spearheading social awareness of inequality in America and worldwide. The streamer was also one of the first to set aside funding ($100 million) for content contractors and production personnel affected by COVID-19.

“To be silent is to be complicit. Black lives matter,” Netflix said on a May 30 post. “We have a platform, and we have a duty to our black members, employees, creators and talent to speak up.”

Jungle Fever

BLU-RAY REVIEW:

Kino Lorber;
Drama;
$29.95 Blu-ray;
‘R’ for sensuality, strong language, drug content, and for violence.
Stars Wesley Snipes, Annabella Sciorra, Samuel L. Jackson, John Turturro, Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee.

A whole big bunch of things are much easier to accomplish than figuring out just what the genre of this ambitious 1991 Spike Lee potpourri is, which means that “Romantic Social Drama” will have to do for now. Though Jungle Fever is a movie I really like and possibly more to the point, really enjoy, I do wonder about the second feature Lee made after the outrageous failure of Do the Right Thing to win the Best Picture Oscar a couple years earlier. Yet if I overrated Fever in my original USA Today review, it still scintillates for me in a way that several best picture winners of the past 20 years have not (though, no, this wasn’t the case with Parasite). Yet, it’s on the messy side, as well as the first historical indication I had of a problem that has plagued the writer-director’s features throughout his career (though not, I would add, his great documentaries).

This is the tendency of Lee to overstuff his narratives (and the running times that usually go along with this) to a degree that would altogether wreck a lot of pictures that lack most of his filmography’s redemptive drive, dependably provocative subject matter, imaginative smorgasbord-like casting and sheer filmmaking passion. Never has that been more true than here, where there are two distinctive storylines that Lee can’t find a way to mesh without large 1.85 seams showing — even if they do feature (but don’t always emphasize to equal degree) at least some of the same characters. In fact, even within the same storyline, the movie sometimes stops to digress, as when a spurned light-skinned Harlem wife (Lonette McKee) and her women friends spend maybe 10 minutes bandying about the frequent tendency of black men to pursue white women in a way that complicates matters for everyone. It doesn’t quite stop the picture but just misses doing so.

Interracial “jungle” attraction is indeed Fever’s main thrust, as McKee’s otherwise sturdy architect husband (Wesley Snipes) shoots past the 98.6 standard with his new Italian temp/secretary (Annabella Sciorra), a Bensonhurst native whose hiring he initially resisted. This is all happening during a period of Snipes resentment toward his white superiors, who are going the namby-pamby route to foil his partnership aspirations despite the highly visible contributions he has made to the firm. Tim Robbins and a cleaned-up Brad Dourif have these roles, and can Robbins ever play this kind of smoothie in his sleep. Snipes ends up getting himself in what one would assume to be financial peril from the accumulation of these events, though this presumed cause-effect is curiously unaddressed.

What is addressed is the racist cretinism of Sciorra’s father and brother, Italian stereotypes of a certain sub-breed who unfortunately don’t come off as stereotypes here — or at least in the way that an unbridled Anthony Quinn (one of those Quinn performances where he risks a hernia reading his dialogue) does playing John Turturro’s oppressive father. Turturro, as the spurned Sciorra boyfriend who works the counter in the family neighborhood drug store, is the sole voice of reason despite getting no help from his own black-hating buddies, who include the Sciorra brothers. Turturro will have nothing of the latter vitriol and despite his pain over having been dumped, is toying with asking out a frequent black store customer who encourages his self-improvement regimen (the exceptionally attractive Tyra Ferrell).

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The movie’s in-name-only other half rates significantly less than 50% screen time but nonetheless provides Jungle with its one indisputably great claim to fame. Nowadays, Samuel L. Jackson is so ubiquitous that if you’re in bed having one of those surreal Melatonin dreams at night, he’s as likely as not to show up in it, even if the dream’s setting is, say, your boss’s toddler daughter’s birthday party. But there was a time when he wasn’t well known, and his performance as Snipes’ crackhead brother so ambushed critics and audiences that, to give one example, the Cannes Film Festival created its first supporting actor award just so that Jackson could be recognized. He’d been around in small roles — there’d even been an appearance in GoodFellas the year previously — but nothing like this. It was something akin to when a relatively obscure Morgan Freeman got cast as a pimp in 1987’s Street Smart from the more often than not ignominious Cannon Films and made such a striking surprise impression that he eventually got an Oscar nomination.

Compared to brother Snipes and, for that matter, nearly everyone else in the picture, Jackson is the bad seed — regularly putting the financial touch on his desperate but enabling mother (Ruby Dee) after his father (Ossie Davis) long ago forbade him even to enter their home. Sometimes, mom’s out of enough cookie-jar money, so dad’s color TV will have to do, whose theft will provide either solace or the funds to go up his nose in a street-side crack den in the company of his companion (Halle Berry — does this movie have a cast or what)? This leads to the movie’s most powerful set piece when Snipes, as a favor to mother Dee, pounds the pavement to find Jackson as Stevie Wonder’s timeless “Living for the City” provides the musical backdrop.

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I would have thought, by 1991 and with an entire Wonder score, the movie would have a stereo track, and matter of fact, there’s one listed at the end of the glorious end credits (more on these in a second). This Blu-ray doesn’t, nor is there any commentary nor much to speak of in terms of chapter stops, which I’m speculating is true as well with other Universal-released Lees that Kino has just issued and that I’m hot to re-see: Mo’ Better Blues; Crooklyn; and Clockers. Also not here is (and I think it would have been) is that great sweaty blacksmith coda — amusingly purloined from Jack Webb’s old Mark VII Productions — that signified one of Lee’s 40 Acres and a Mule Filmworks productions.

But in any rendering, Fever’s exit music is “Feeding Off the Love of the Land,” my favorite Stevie ballad ever and for some reason a song not on the original soundtrack CD, an omission that rated a zillion-decibel string of profanities from me in 1991 before it much later showed up on a couple of pricey Wonder sets. (Motown released it as a single, but I suspect it was without the strings that Spike’s musician father Bill Lee added for the movie’s version, which I personally think “makes” the finale.)  I also love the way its lyrics splash across the screen a line at the time, an effect I don’t think I’ve ever seen in any other movie. It’s a very powerful way to send audiences home (or wrap up a viewing-room evening) — even if, as frequently compelling as Jungle is, a viewer can be forgiven for wondering what exactly he or she has just seen.

Mike’s Picks: ‘Cimarron’ and ‘Jungle Fever’

Kino Unveils ‘Mo’ Better Blues,’ ‘Jungle Fever’ and Other Spike Lee Classics on Blu-ray

Kino Lorber Studio Classics has released on Blu-ray five films by director Spike Lee, Mo’ Better BluesJungle Fever, Crooklyn, Clockers and Summer of Sam.

Summer of Sam is also available on DVD.

Each Blu-ray includes optional English subtitles as well as the theatrical trailer for the film. CrooklynClockers and Summer of Sam all include 5.1 Surround and 2.0 Lossless Stereo audio options. Mo’ Better Blues and Clockers both include a new audio commentary by film critic Kameron Austin Collins. Summer of Sam also includes “Fear City,” a new interview with John Leguizamo, and audio commentary by Lee and Leguizamo.

Mo’ Better Blues (1990) follows talented trumpeter Bleek Gilliam (Denzel Washington) who’s obsessed by his music and indecisive about his two girlfriends (Joie Lee and Cynda Williams). But when he has to come to the aid of his manager and childhood friend (Lee), Bleek finds his world more fragile than he ever imagined. The cast also includes Wesley Snipes, Giancarlo Esposito, Robin Harris, Bill Nunn, John Turturro, Nicholas Turturro, Samuel L. Jackson, Charlie Murphy, Abbey Lincoln and Rubén Blades.

Jungle Fever (1991) explores the provocative consequences of interracial relationships. African American architect Flipper Purify (Wesley Snipes) begins an affair with his working-class Italian American secretary, Angie Tucci (Annabella Sciorra), which causes them to be scrutinized by their friends, cast out from their families and shunned by their neighbors. The film also stars Lee, Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee, Anthony Quinn, John Turturro, Samuel L. Jackson, Halle Berry, Tim Robbins, Lonette McKee, Frank Vincent, Brad Dourif, Nicholas Turturro, Michael Imperioli, Michael Badalucco, Debi Mazar, Theresa Randle, Rick Aiello, Miguel Sandoval and Charlie Murphy. It features music by Stevie Wonder.

Crooklyn (1994) is a semi-autobiographical portrait of a schoolteacher, her stubborn jazz musician husband and their five kids living in Brooklyn in 1973. The film follows the Carmichael family as they experience one very special summer in their Brooklyn neighborhood that they’ve affectionately nicknamed Crooklyn. Lee fashions a bold, flavorful picture of family life starring the wonderful Alfre Woodard as Carolyn, a loving, but fiercely independent mother who, along with her musician husband Woody (Delroy Lindo), struggles to raise their family in difficult but often wonderful circumstances. The supporting cast includes Lee, David Patrick Kelly, Zelda Harris, Isaiah Washington, José Zúñiga and Vondie Curtis-Hall.

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Clockers (1995) is a crime-drama based on a book by Richard Price (The Wanderers), who co-wrote the screenplay with Lee. A “clocker” is a 24-hour drug dealer, and Strike (Mekhi Phifer) is the hardest-working one on the streets. But for Strike, time is running out. When the local drug kingpin tips Strike off about an opportunity for advancement, a rival dealer ends up dead, and Strike suddenly finds himself caught between two homicide detectives. One is Mazilli (John Turturro), who’s only looking for an easy bust. The other is Rocco (Harvey Keitel), who’s looking for something much harder to find-the truth-and when Strike’s law-abiding brother confesses to the murder, Rocco vows not to rest until he’s sure the real shooter is behind bars. The film also includes performances by Delroy Lindo, Keith David, Isaiah Washington, Regina Taylor and Michael Imperioli.

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Summer of Sam (1999) is Lee’s take on the “Son of Sam” murders in New York City during the summer of 1977, centering on the residents of an Italian-American Bronx neighborhood who live in fear and distrust of one another. The heat is soaring to record highs, blackouts are filling the streets with looters and the murders of a man who calls himself the Son of Sam are gripping the city in fear. As friends in a small Bronx community become obsessed with the idea that the Son of Sam is someone nearby, the madman’s fearsome plague of terror becomes the catalyst that prompts relationships to fall apart and trust to disintegrate into dread. The film stars John Leguizamo, Adrien Brody, Mira Sorvino, Jennifer Esposito, Michael Rispoli, Bebe Neuwirth, Patti LuPone, Mike Starr, Anthony LaPaglia and Ben Gazzara.

Criterion March 2020 Slate Includes Films From Streisand, Spike Lee

The Criterion Collection March 2020 slate of special-edition Blu-rays will include John M. Stahl’s Technicolor melodrama Leave Her to Heaven, Spike Lee’s satire Bamboozled, James Whale’s Show Boat with Irene Dunne and Paul Robeson, director-producer-star Barbra Streisand’s The Prince of Tides, the Maysles brothers’ Salesman, and Mikhail Kalatozov’s The Cranes Are Flying.

Due March 10 on Blu-ray is 1969’s Salesman, a portrait of American dreams and disillusionment from Direct Cinema pioneers David Maysles, Albert Maysles and Charlotte Zwerin. The film explores the worlds of four dogged door-to-door Bible salesmen as they travel from Boston to Florida on a seemingly futile quest to sell luxury editions of the Good Book to working-class Catholics. The Blu-ray will feature a new 4K restoration, plus a new appreciation of the film by actor Bill Hader; audio commentary from 2001 featuring directors Albert Maysles and Charlotte Zwerin; “Globesman,” a 2016 episode of the television series “Documentary Now!” that parodies the film, starring Hader and Fred Armisen; a television interview from 1968 with directors David and Albert Maysles, conducted by critic Jack Kroll; an audio excerpt from a 2000 episode of NPR’s “Weekend Edition” profiling James Baker, one of the salesmen featured in the film; the film’s trailer; and an essay by critic Michael Chaiken.

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Due March 17 on Blu-ray and DVD is director Spike Lee’s Bamboozled, a satire from 2000 that examines the past, present and future of racism in American popular culture. Under pressure to help revive his network’s low ratings, television writer Pierre Delacroix (Damon Wayans) hits on an explosively offensive idea: bringing back blackface for a “new-millennium minstrel show.” The home video release includes a new 2K digital restoration, with a 5.1 surround DTS-HD master audio soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras include a 2001 audio commentary by Lee; a new conversation between Lee and film programmer and critic Ashley Clark; new interviews with choreographer and actor Savion Glover, actor Tommy Davidson, and costume designer Ruth E. Carter; “On Blackface and the Minstrel Show,” a new interview program featuring film and media scholar Racquel Gates; “The Making of Bamboozled,” a documentary from 2001 featuring members of the cast and crew; deleted scenes; music videos for the Mau Maus’ “Blak Iz Blak” and Gerald Levert’s “Dream With No Love”; alternate parody commercials created for the film; a poster gallery and trailer; and an essay by Clark.

Due March 24 on Blu-ray and DVD is the 1957 Soviet film The Cranes Are Flying from director Mikhail Kalatozov, about a couple who are in love until the eruption of World War II tears them apart. The home video features a new 2K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray, and a new English subtitle translation. Extras include a new interview with scholar Ian Christie on why the film is a landmark of Soviet cinema; an audio interview from 1961 with Kalatozov; Hurricane Kalatozov, a documentary from 2009 on the Georgian director’s complex relationship with the Soviet government; a segment from a 2008 program about the film’s cinematography, featuring original storyboards and an interview with actor Alexei Batalov; an interview from 2001 with filmmaker Claude Lelouch on the film’s French premiere at the 1958 Cannes Film Festival; and an essay by critic Chris Fujiwara.

Also due March 24 on Blu-ray and DVD is 1945’s Leave Her to Heaven from director John M. Shahl. Novelist Richard Harland (Cornel Wilde) seems to have found the perfect woman in Ellen (Gene Tierney), a beautiful socialite who initiates a whirlwind romance and steers him into marriage before he can think twice. Yet the glassy surface of Ellen’s devotion soon reveals monstrous depths, as Richard comes to realize that his wife is shockingly possessive and may be capable of destroying anyone who comes between them. The home video includes a new 2K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras include a new interview with critic Imogen Sara Smith, the film’s trailer, and an essay by novelist Megan Abbott.

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Due March 31 on Blu-ray and DVD is the musical Show Boat, director James Whale’s 1936 take on Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II’s adaptation of Edna Ferber’s novel. Show Boat spans four decades and three generations as it follows the fortunes of the stage-struck Magnolia (Irene Dunne), an aspiring actor whose journey takes her from her family’s humble floating playhouse in the 1880s South to the height of fame in the 1930s North. The cast of show-business legends includes Helen Morgan, Hattie McDaniel, Charles Winninger and Paul Robeson, who provides an iconic rendition of “Ol’ Man River.” The home video includes a new 4K digital transfer, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras include audio commentary from 1989 featuring American-musical historian Miles Kreuger; a new interview with James Whale biographer James Curtis; “Recognizing Race in Show Boat,” a new interview program featuring professor and author Shana L. Redmond; Paul Robeson: Tribute to an Artist, a newly restored Academy Award-winning short documentary from 1979 by Saul J. Turell; two performances from the sound prologue of the 1929 film version of Show Boat, plus 20 minutes of silent excerpts from the film, with audio commentary by Kreuger; two radio adaptations of Show Boat, featuring stage and screen cast members Allan Jones, Helen Morgan and Charles Winninger, plus actor Orson Welles and novelist Edna Ferber; and an essay by critic Gary Giddins.

Also due March 31 on Blu-ray and DVD is the 1991 adaptation of Pat Conroy’s novel The Prince of Tides, directed by and starring Barbra Streisand. Summoned to New York after his sister attempts suicide, Tom Wingo (Nick Nolte) must serve as her memory, reckoning with the traumas of their southern childhood so that her psychiatrist, Dr. Susan Lowenstein (Streisand), can help her recover. But Tom’s sessions with Lowenstein will plunge him into the depths of his own long-repressed pain-and reawaken the possibility of love within him. The home video features a new 4K digital restoration, with a 2.0 surround DTS-HD master audio soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras include an audio commentary featuring Streisand, recorded in 1991 and updated in 2019; a making-of featurette from 1991; an excerpt from a 2018 interview with Streisand, conducted by filmmaker Robert Rodriguez on El Rey Network’s “The Director’s Chair”; audition and rehearsal footage; deleted scenes and alternate takes; costume and makeup tests; alternate end credits with vocal performance by Streisand; behind-the-scenes footage; a gag reel; a production-stills gallery and other archival materials; an interview with author Pat Conroy from a 1992 episode of “Cinema Showcase” with Jim Whaley; an interview with Streisand from a 1992 episode of the British television show “Aspel & Company” with Michael Aspel; trailers; and an essay by film historian Bruce Eder.

 

Criterion July 2019 Slate Includes ‘1984,’ ‘Do the Right Thing’

Titles coming to the Criterion Collection in July 2019 will include Michael Radford’s 1984, Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing, the Jane Fonda starrer Klute, Agnieszka Holland’s Europa Europa, the 1938 comedy The Baker’s Wife and a Blu-ray edition of Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s BRD Trilogy.

July 9 (order date June 11) sees the Blu-ray release of the BRD Trilogy, a trio of films focused on the perspectives of three women in West Germany following World War II. The trilogy includes 1979’s The Marriage of Maria Braun, 1981’s Lola and 1982’s Veronika Voss. The films are in German with English subtitles

The set includes new 4K digital restorations of The Marriage of Maria Braun and Lola, with uncompressed monaural soundtracks; a high-definition digital restoration of Veronika Voss, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack; audio commentaries from 2003 featuring filmmaker Wim Wenders and cinematographer Michael Ballhaus (The Marriage of Maria Braun), film critic and author Tony Rayns (Veronika Voss), and film scholar Christian Braad Thomsen (Lola); interviews with actors Hanna Schygulla, Rosel Zech,and Barbara Sukowa; interviews with cinematographer Xaver Schwarzenberger, screenwriter Peter Märthesheimer and film scholar Eric Rentschler; Life Stories: A Conversation with R. W. Fassbinder, an interview filmed for German television in 1978; I Don’t Just Want You to Love Me, a feature-length 1992 documentary on Fassbinder’s life and career; Dance With Death, a program from 2000 about Ufa studios star Sybille Schmitz, Fassbinder’s inspiration for the character Veronika Voss; a conversation between author and curator Laurence Kardish and film editor Juliane Lorenz; trailers; plus an essay by film critic Kent Jones and production histories by author Michael Töteberg.

Also due July 9 on DVD and Blu-ray is 1990’s Europa Europa, the story of a 16-year-old German Jew separated from his family during World War II. The release includes a new 2K digital restoration supervised by director Agnieszka Holland, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras include an audio commentary from 2008 featuring Holland; new interviews with Holland and actor Marco Hofschneider; a new video essay by film scholar Annette Insdorf; a new English subtitle translation; and an essay by critic Amy Taubin.

Due July 16 (order date June 18) on DVD and Blu-ray is 1971’s Klute, starring Jane Fonda as a call-girl and aspiring actress who becomes the focal point of a missing-person investigation when detective John Klute (Donald Sutherland) turns up at her door. The release includes a new, restored 4K digital transfer, supervised by camera operator Michael Chapman, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras include a new conversation between actors Jane Fonda and Illeana Douglas; a new documentary about Klute and director Alan J. Pakula by filmmaker Matthew Miele, featuring scholars, filmmakers, and Pakula’s family and friends; “The Look of Klute,” a new interview with writer Amy Fine Collins; archival interviews with Pakula and Fonda; “Klute in New York,” a short documentary made during the shooting of the film; plus an essay by critic Mark Harris and excerpts from a 1972 interview with Pakula.

Also arriving DVD and Blu-ray July 16 is The Baker’s Wife, a comedy from playwright turned cinema auteur Marcel Pagnol, who draws a vivid portrait of a close-knit village where the marital woes of a sweetly deluded baker (Raimu) snowball into a scandal that engulfs the entire town. The release includes a new 4K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras include selected-scene audio commentary featuring Pagnol scholar Brett Bowles; an introduction by Pagnol from 1967; an excerpt from a 1966 interview with Pagnol for the French television series “Cinéastes de notre temps”; a short French news program from 1967 revisiting the village of Le Castellet, where the film was shot; a new English subtitle translation; plus an essay by film scholar Ginette Vincendeau.

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Arriving July 23 (order date June 25) on Blu-ray and DVD is 1984, an adaptation of the George Orwell novel starring John Hurt and Suzanna Hamilton. The release includes a new 4K digital restoration supervised by cinematographer Roger Deakins, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras include new interviews with director Michael Radford and Deakins; a new interview with David Ryan, author of George Orwell on Screen; behind-the-scenes footage; the film’s trailer; and an essay by writer and performer A. L. Kennedy.

Also arriving July 23 on Blu-ray and DVD is 1989’s Do the Right Thing. The release includes a new 4K digital restoration approved by cinematographer Ernest Dickerson, with 5.1 surround DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras include audio commentary from 1995 featuring director Spike Lee, Dickerson, production designer Wynn Thomas, and actor Joie Lee; introductions by Spike Lee; “Making Do the Right Thing,” a documentary from 1988 by St. Clair Bourne; new interviews with costume designer Ruth E. Carter, camera assistant Darnell Martin, New York City Council Member Robert Cornegy Jr., and writer Nelson George; an interview with editor Barry Alexander Brown from 2000; programs from 2000 and 2009 featuring Lee and members of the cast and crew; a music video for Public Enemy’s “Fight the Power,” directed by Spike Lee, with remarks from rapper Chuck D; behind-the-scenes footage; the Cannes Film Festival press conference from 1989; deleted and extended scenes; original storyboards, trailer, and TV spots; Plus an essay by critic Vinson Cunningham, and (on the Blu-ray) extensive excerpts from the journal Lee kept during the preparation for and production of the film.

‘Black Panther’ Top Pick for Best Picture Oscar in Fandango Fan Survey

Black Panther was the top pick in the Best Picture race, while Rami Malek (Bohemian Rhapsody) and Lady Gaga (A Star Is Born) were the favorites in the Best Actor and Actress categories, in a survey of more than 3,000 movie fans on ticketing site Fandango and its VOD platform FandangoNow.

First-time nominee in the Best Director category, Spike Lee, was the fans’ choice for his work on BlackKklansman.

The Academy Awards will be announced Feb. 24.

“Fans came to the theater in droves and helped make Black Panther a cultural phenomenon, and now they want to see the film take home a big win for Wakanda,” said Fandango managing editor Erik Davis in a statement. “Moviegoers are also rooting for powerhouse musical performances this year, with Star Is Born’s Lady Gaga and Bohemian Rhapsody‘s Rami Malek getting the top fan honors in the acting races. While it’s hard to believe this is Spike Lee’s first directorial nod, Fandango fans feel it would be a delight to see the Academy do the right thing and give a well-deserved award to the BlacKkKlansman director.”

FandangoNow is also offering fans the opportunity to watch four Oscar contenders — Green Book, The Favourite, Free Solo and Mary Queen of Scots — for 30% off with the code “FNOWOscar.” The promotion ends Feb. 21.

Fans can find this year’s nominees on FandangoNow’s curated Oscars list here. Fandango has also created a downloadable Oscar ballot with Rotten Tomatoes’ Tomatometer scores for all the nominated films.

Complete results of the survey were:

 

Best Picture

Black Panther – 24%

Bohemian Rhapsody – 19%

A Star Is Born – 18%

Green Book – 14%

BlacKkKlansman – 8%

Roma – 7%

The Favourite – 6%

Vice – 4%

 

Best Leading Actor

Rami Malek, Bohemian Rhapsody – 44%

Bradley Cooper, A Star Is Born – 20%

Christian Bale, Vice – 19%

Viggo Mortensen, Green Book – 11%\

Willem Dafoe, At Eternity’s Gate – 6%

 

Best Leading Actress

Lady Gaga, A Star Is Born – 42%

Glenn Close, The Wife – 22%

Olivia Colman, The Favourite – 13%

Melissa McCarthy, Can You Ever Forgive Me? – 13%

Yalitza Aparicio, Roma – 10%

 

Best Supporting Actor

Mahershala Ali, Green Book – 40%

Sam Elliott, A Star Is Born – 28%

Adam Driver, BlacKkKlansman – 16%

Sam Rockwell, Vice – 10%

Richard E. Grant, Can You Ever Forgive Me? – 6%

 

Best Supporting Actress

Regina King, If Beale Street Could Talk – 35%

Emma Stone, The Favourite – 24%

Amy Adams, Vice – 19%

Rachel Weisz, The Favourite – 15%

Marina de Tavira, Roma – 7%

 

Best Director

Spike Lee, BlacKkKlansman – 36%

Alfonso Cuarón, Roma – 25%

Adam McKay, Vice – 18%

Yorgos Lanthimos, The Favourite – 14%

Pawel Pawlikowski, Cold War – 7%

 

Best Animated Feature

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse – 50%

Incredibles 2 – 24%

Isle of Dogs – 15%

Ralph Breaks the Internet – 10%

Mirai – 1%

 

Best Original Screenplay

Green Book – 38%

The Favourite – 21%

Vice – 17%

Roma – 17%

First Reformed – 7%

 

Best Adapted Screenplay

A Star Is Born – 38%

BlacKkKlansman – 23%

If Beale Street Could Talk – 20%

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs – 10%

Can You Ever Forgive Me? – 9%

 

Best Original Song

“Shallow” from A Star Is Born – 52%

“All The Stars” from Black Panther – 22%

“The Place Where Lost Things Go” from Mary Poppins Returns – 14%

“When a Cowboy Trades His Spurs For Wings” from The Ballad of Buster Scruggs – 6%

“I’ll Fight” from RBG – 6%

‘Incredibles 2,’ Three Other New Releases Among Redbox’s Top 10 DVD, Blu-ray Disc Rentals

The Incredibles 2, the latest animated hit from Walt Disney Studios, debuted at No. 1 on the Redbox kiosk chart for the week ended Nov. 11.

Lionsgate’s The Spy Who Dumped Me, meanwhile, remained at No. 1 on the Redbox On Demand chart for the second consecutive week.

The action comedy, with Mila Kunis and Kate McKinnon as two best friends on the run from assassins, had debuted in the top spot the prior week on both charts. The film slipped to No. 2 on the kiosk chart, which tracks DVD and Blu-ray Disc rentals at the company’s more than 40,000 red disc vending machines.

Universal Pictures’ BlacKkKlansman came in at No. 2 on the Redbox On Demand digital chart, which tracks digital transactions, both electronic sellthrough (EST) and transactional video-on-demand (TVOD) streaming. The Spike Lee-helmed biopic, about a black cop who sets out to infiltrate and expose the local chapter of the Ku Klux Klan, grossed $48.3 million in U.S. and Canadian theaters.

BlacKkKlansman debuted at No. 4 on the Redbox disc-rental chart, one spot behind Disney’s Ant-Man and the Wasp, which slipped to No. 3 from No. 2 the prior week.

Rounding out the top five on the Redbox kiosk chart for the week was another Universal Pictures film, Skyscraper, the action film about a high-rise rescue starring Dwayne Johnson and Neve Campbell.

On the Redbox On Demand digital chart, Skyscraper finished the week at No. 3, down a spot from the prior week.

The No. 4 spot went to Universal Pictures’ 2018 Papillon remake, with 20th Century Fox’s The Darkest Minds coming in at No. 5

The Darkest Minds also debuted at No. 7 on the Redbox disc-rental chart, the third new release to bow in the top 10 for the week.

The Darkest Minds is a science fiction thriller film based on Alexandra Bracken’s young adult novel of the same name. The film stars Amandla Stenberg, Harris Dickinson, Mandy Moore, and Gwendoline Christie and follows a group of teenagers on the run from the government after mysteriously developing superpowers. The film earned just $12.7 million in North American theaters.

A fourth new DVD and Blu-ray Disc release, Disney’s Christopher Robin, debuted at No. 9 on the Redbox kiosk chart with a domestic theatrical gross of $99.1 million.

 

Top DVD and Blu-ray Disc Rentals, Redbox Kiosks, Week Ending November 11

  1. The Incredibles 2 (new)
  2. The Spy Who Dumped Me
  3. Ant-Man and the Wasp
  4. BlacKkKlansman (new)
  5. Skyscraper
  6. Hotel Transylvania 3
  7. The Darkest Minds (new)
  8. Slender Man
  9. Christopher Robin (new)
  10. Teen Titans Go! To the Movies

 

Top Digital, Redbox On Demand, Week Ending November 11

  1. The Spy Who Dumped Me
  2. BlacKkKlansman (new)
  3. Skyscraper
  4. Papillon (2018)
  5. The Darkest Minds
  6. Hotel Transylvania 3
  7. Ocean’s 8
  8. Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again
  9. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom
  10. Slender Man

 

Visit the Redbox website.

Buy or rent Redbox On Demand movies.

Spike Lee’s ‘BlacKkKlansman’ Due on Digital Oct. 23, Disc Nov. 6 From Universal

BlacKkKlansman, director Spike Lee’s film of the true story of Ron Stallwortth, an African-American police officer who infiltrates the Ku Klux Klan, will arrive on digital (including Movies Anywhere) Oct. 23 and on 4K Ultra HD, Blu-ray, DVD and on demand Nov. 6 from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment.

Based on the book Black Klansman by Stallworth, BlacKkKlansman stars John David Washington (“Ballers,” Malcolm X), Adam Driver (Star Wars: The Force AwakensLogan Lucky), Topher Grace (Interstellar, “That 70’s Show”), Laura Harrier (Spider-Man: HomecomingThe Last Five Years), Alec Baldwin (“Saturday Night Live,” Mission Impossible – Fallout), Corey Hawkins (Straight Outta ComptonKong: Skull Island), Ryan Eggold (“The Blacklist,” “Sons of Liberty”) and Paul Walter Hauser (I, TonyaSuper Troopers 2).
In the early 1970s Stallworth (Washington) becomes the first African-American detective in the Colorado Springs Police Department where he sets out to infiltrate and expose the Ku Klux Klan. He recruits a seasoned colleague, Flip Zimmerman (Driver), into the undercover investigation.

Special features on 4K UHD, Blu-ray, DVD and digital include “A Spike Lee Joint,” in which producer Jordan Peele, cast and film subject Ron Stallworth discuss working with Lee, and the extended trailer featuring Prince’s “Mary Don’t You Weep.”

BlacKkKlansman will be available on 4K Ultra HD in a combo pack which includes 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, Blu-ray and digital. The 4K Ultra HD disc will include the same bonus features as the Blu-ray version, all in 4K resolution.