Netflix Spain Raises Prices

Netflix is continuing to roll out price hikes across Western Europe with Spain reportedly the latest country to see a €2 monthly increase to €12.99 ($14.80) from €10.99 ($12.52).

Netflix previously raised prices in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

Netflix Spain also upped the fee for Ultra-HD on up to four devices to €15.99 ($18.22) from €13.99 ($15.94). The basic plan remains unchanged at €7.99 ($9.11) per month.

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Netflix in January raised by $2 its most-popular plan in the U.S. to $12.99 from $10.99. The basic $7.99 non-HD plan increased to $8.99, while the premium plan allowing four simultaneous 4K streams increase to $15.99 per month from $13.99.

Comcast Cuts Spain’s Llega Sky SVOD Pricing 31%

Llega Sky, the British satellite operator’s nascent streaming video service in Spain, is cutting the monthly subscription price 31% to €6.99 from €9.99.

Launched in September 2017, Llega Sky offered TV series and on-demand movies from around the world in Spanish, predominantly in HD.

Despite including 12 popular pay TV channels, combined with access to TV shows “The Walking Dead,” “Big Bang Theory” and Grey’s Anatomy,” and hundreds of movies, the service has struggled to resonate with consumers.

Llega Sky reportedly has generated just 114,000 paying subscribers – significantly behind market leader Netflix with 2 million, HBO (475,000) and Rakuten (147,000).

The move follows Hulu’s decision in the United States to reduce the basic subscription plan (with advertising) to $5.99 from $7.99. The SVOD service recently disclosed it had topped 25 million subscribers, which includes online TV platform, Hulu with Live TV.

Sky’s corporate parent Comcast last week revealed it plans to expand over-the-top video platform Now TV platform across Europe.

Now TV offers monthly entertainment packages targeting movies (Sky Cinema), general entertainment, Premier League soccer (Sky Sports), children’s programming (Sky Kids) and reality TV-based Hayu – which is owned by NBC Universal and available in the U.K., Ireland, Australia, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Canada, Holland, Belgium and Luxembourg.

 

 

 

Acorn TV Bows Service in Spain

AMC Networks’ British-themed subscription streaming video service Acorn TV is launching operations in Spain.

Acorn TV, which is part of home entertainment distributor RLJ Entertainment that AMC owns a majority stake in, last December announced plans to launch service in Australia, New Zealand, India, South Africa, 10 European countries, South America, as well as Caribbean countries.

Consumers can go to acorn.tv to subscribe or access the service via apps on Apple TV, Android, iPhone, iPads, and Roku streaming players. The programs will be in English-language with English and Spanish subtitles available. The Acorn TV streaming service is available for €4.99 per month.

“Streaming is booming in Spain with 74% of users watching TV content through the Internet, placing Spain as the largest streaming penetration country in the world – even ahead of USA”, Miguel Penella, CEO of RLJ Entertainment, said in a statement.

 

Netflix Establishes Content Production Hub in Madrid

Seeking to better coordinate original content production in Europe, Netflix July 24 announced the establishment of its first production hub in Madrid.

The hub will be located at Ciudad de la Tele (TV City), a new campus in Tres Cantos, Madrid, being developed and managed by Grupo Secuoya, an audiovisual production services company.

The hub will be a central facility for Netflix’s growing slate of Spanish-language original content over the coming years, including new and existing titles produced by Netflix, as well as series and films made by production partners for Netflix.

As part of the multi-year partnership, Grupo Secuoya will provide facility management and other services to Netflix, including being the exclusive production services partner for projects based at the Ciudad de la Tele campus. Netflix will take occupancy of three sound stages beginning in September, with the option to occupy additional space as construction completes.

“Spain has a rich heritage of innovative, immersive content creation and we are excited to strengthen our investment in the cultural heartland of Madrid,” Erik Barmack, VP of international originals at Netflix, said in a statement.

Creation of the production hub reflects Netflix’s deepening investment in Spain, with over 13,000 cast, crew and extras working on 20 Netflix original productions across the country this year.

Spanish titles coming soon to Netflix include season 3 of “Las Chicas del Cable” on Sept. 7th and Élite, a young adult drama coming soon, with titles currently in production, including Isabel Coixet’s new original film Elisa & Marcela and The Alcásser Murders, a new original documentary series.

Netflix recently announced an overall deal with Álex Pina, creator of “La Casa de Papel” (Money Heist), the most watched non-English language show on Netflix. Netflix is also investing significantly in licensed and co-produced titles created by Spanish broadcasters and producers. This includes a recent agreement for first-option access to drama series from Atresmedia, with “Fariña” and “La Catedral del Mar,” among the upcoming titles launching on Netflix globally.

“Netflix sets a world-class standard in its production process and the decision to create a production hub in Madrid is proof of Spain’s leadership in the audiovisual industry, as well as the depth of its talent pool,” said Raúl Berdonés, president of Grupo Secuoya.

“We very much welcome Netflix’s decision to establish its first European production hub in our country,” added María Peña, CEO of ICEX, the Spanish government agency for trade and investment promotion. “We are sure this project will contribute strongly to positioning Spain as a competitive location for the global entertainment industry. In that respect, it will be entitled to our full support.”

FilmStruck Bows Service in France and Spain

FilmStruck, the online movie subscription streaming service owned by WarnerMedia, has launched operations in France and Spain.

The subscription video on-demand service, which entered the international marketplace with its U.K. launch in February, offers French and Spanish consumers a diverse movie catalogue from the Warner Bros. library and the Criterion Collection library, as well as other global and local content partners.

The service offers a range of critically acclaimed movies across many categories – independent, classic, cult, contemporary and world Cinema – and also features curated themes and exclusive bonus material, including cast interviews, original artwork, Criterion mini-documentaries and hosted introductions.

With a strong emphasis on catering to different audiences with local content, FilmStruck content for each market reflects local curation expertise. The service for France will draw on local content partners Carlotta Films, MK2, RKO and StudioCanal, while the service for Spain will team with local content providers Wanda, Caramel and A Contracorriente Films, among others.

“Rolling FilmStruck out to these additional markets is a significant next step for us,” Aksel van der Wal, EVP, Turner International’s Digital Ventures & Innovation Group, said in a statement. “France and Spain both have a rich heritage in and love for movies, as well as being rapidly developing SVOD markets, which makes them both exciting markets to tap into with what we believe is a fresh and differentiated offering working with fantastic content partners.”

The expansion of the service into France and Spain comes shortly after DV&I and WBDN announced the appointment of Kerensa Samanidis to the role of GM, FilmStruck, International. Samanidis joins from the British Film Institute where she was head of digital products and distribution overseeing BFI’s digital strategy.

Netflix Enters Pact with Spain’s Largest Telecom

As expected, Netflix and Telefónica, Spain’s largest telecom, have inked an agreement enabling the SVOD pioneer to be embedded in the latter’s Movistar over-the-top video service in Europe and Latin America.

The first launches in several countries will be announced in the next few weeks and further launches will happen throughout the region in 2018.

The agreement is part of Telefónica’s plan to collaborate with top media and distribution companies around the world, according to the telecom’s president Álvarez-Pallete.

“We want to offer our customers the most compelling video offering possible, whether it’s our own content or third party providers,” he said. “The partnership with Netflix will significantly enhance our existing multichannel video platforms.”

Similar to other direct-access deals between pay-TV operators and Netflix, Telefónica embeds the SVOD app on its platform affording members with a Netflix account easier access to programming.

“Over the next several years, our partnership with Telefónica will benefit millions of consumers who will be able to easily access their favorite Netflix shows, documentaries, stand-ups, kids content and movies across a range of Telefónica platforms,” said Reed Hastings, co-founder and CEO of Netflix. “Making Netflix available on Telefónica’s familiar, easy-to-use TV and video platforms enables consumers to watch all the content they love in one place.”

Netflix Expanding Spanish Pay-TV Access with Telefónica

Netflix reportedly is about to sign a distribution agreement with Spanish telecommunications giant Telefónica.

Under terms of the deal – which hasn’t been publicly disclosed – Telefónica would offer full access (i.e. content integration) to Netflix on its Movistar pay-TV service, which has 3.7 million subscribers, according to Reuters.

By comparison, Netflix’s pay-TV deals with France’s Orange and Vodafone in the United Kingdom enable subscribers direct access to the SVOD pioneer.

Telefónica has operations in almost 20 countries outside Spain, and is the fourth-largest company globally, according to Forbes.

Moviestar, which recently launched original series, “The Plague” to record viewership for a Spanish telecom, has already taken a page from the Netflix playbook enabling subscribers access to all episodes at launch.

Indeed, 20% of viewers binged-streamed the entire series in the first four days, according to Variety.

Netflix has more than 1.1 million subs in Spain – low by European standards.