Regal Theaters Employ Augmented Reality in Prize Giveaway

The Regal theater chain, beginning April 15, has launched a weeklong, nationwide “Easter egg hunt” bringing movie posters to life via augmented reality.

Movie fans can use the Regal mobile app’s augmented reality filter to scan in-theater posters and unlock rewards, redeemable through April 30 at all participating Regal theaters.

“The race is on for our moviegoers with this one-of-a-kind promotion, which features incredible prizes hidden in posters of the year’s most anticipated movies,” said Chris Sylvia, VP of media at Regal, in a statement. “With the rise of augmented reality, we strive to stay on the forefront of cutting-edge technology to give our guests unbeatable entertainment experiences, as well as reward Regal’s loyal moviegoers.”

Subscribe HERE to our FREE daily newsletter!  

To discover the hidden rewards, consumers open the Regal mobile app and click on the camera icon in the top-right corner of the home screen to unveil an augmented reality platform that, when aimed at the correct poster, will reveal the hidden egg and its associated prize.

Prizes include free popcorn, bonus Regal Crown Club credits and 25 percent off an entire credit order in the Regal Reward Center. Supplies are limited.

No. 2 Global Theater Chain Cineworld Enters Netflix ‘Roma’ Dispute

Cineworld, the world’s second-largest theatrical chain (after AMC Theatres), has joined a growing dispute regarding Netflix’s aggressive marketing foray into industry movie awards.

The U.K.-based chain, which acquired Regal Cinemas last year for $3.6 billion, this week informed the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) that it was pulling support for the organization after it honored Netflix original movie, Roma, with the Best Film award, among others, in February.

In a letter to BAFTA, Cineworld cited the organization for breaking its rules by nominating a “made for TV” movie for awards consideration. Netflix’s black-and-white film about a 1970s family in Mexico picked up four BAFTA trophies, including for cinematography, foreign language and director (Alfonso Cuarón).

Like this story? Then subscribe HERE to our FREE daily newsletter!

While Netflix’s aversion to the traditional 90-day theatrical window for original movies isn’t new, the streaming pioneer’s aggressive marketing push and success with Roma has upped angst among exhibitors and some industry veterans.

In an attempt to assuage industry protocol, Netflix released Roma in select (largely) independent theaters early, followed quickly with global streaming access.

Combined with a marketing blitz in Los Angeles and New York, Roma picked up 10 Oscar nominations, winning the same three BAFTA categories – but not Best Picture.

BAFTA, which denied it broke its own rules affording Roma awards consideration, said it would initiate a “review of our eligibility criteria in the coming months,” as reported by Deadline.com.

Netflix, which reportedly spent $30 million marketing Roma to voting members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, upped its marketing spend after one of its first original movies – critically acclaimed Beasts of No Nation, starring Idris Elba – was shunned by major industry awards in 2015, despite 91% favorable rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

The film generated just $90,000 at the box office following a nationwide exhibitor boycott.

Notably, Elba became the first actor to win a SAG best supporting actor award for his performance without being nominated for an Oscar.

 

Survey: Consumers Willing to Pay $22 Monthly to See Three Theatrical Movies Monthly

As theatrical ticket subscription pioneer MoviePass struggles to remain in business, a new survey reveals consumers are willing to pay more than twice the $9.95 fee MoviePass currently charges subscribers.

The survey conducted Oct. 11-14 among 2,201 adults from Morning Consult and commissioned by The Hollywood Reporter, found respondents would pay upwards of $22 monthly to watch three theatrical screenings monthly.

Respondents said they would also pay $25 to see three movies per week, and $33 for unlimited screenings.

MoviePass set the exhibition industry on its ear last year when it launched service offering subscribers daily access to a theatrical screening for less than $10 per month. With the service paying exhibitors such as AMC Theatres and Regal Cinema face value for each ticket consumed by subscribers, fiscal losses began to spiral out of control.

MoviePass now limits subs to three select screenings per month. Restrictions that resulted in AMC and Cinemark launching competing ticket subscriptions – the former priced at $19.95 enabling subs access to three screening weekly in any format, including Imax, Dolby Cinema and RealD 3D.

Three in 10 frequent moviegoers subscribe to AMC Stubs A-List, while 27% subscribe to MoviePass.

Notably, the survey revealed that just 6% of respondents are “very likely” to purchase a subscription service, while 23% could go either way. That left 71% of respondents who said they were either not very likely (32%) to purchase a subscription or had no interest (29%) in buying one. Another 10% didn’t know or had no opinion.

Millennials are the most likely to purchase a ticket subscription.

According to the survey, perks that would incentivize consumers to use a subscription service include: unused tickets rolling over to the next month (22%); ability to choose from a variety of plans/theaters (19%); the number of movies included (15%); and the ability to use subscription tickets to bring friends (25%).

 

Analyst Calls MoviePass’ $128.7 Million Oscar Box Office Contribution Claim Disingenuous

When upstart MoviePass recently announced it had contributed $128.7 million in box office for select Oscar-nominated films, it appeared to underscore both market demand and importance of a theatrical ticket subscription service.

Upon closer scrutiny, it was reported that the box office for Oscar nods Call Me By Your Name, Lady Bird, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, The Shape of Water, The Post, I, Tonya and The Square had combined ticket sales of $17 million.

MoviePass then clarified the Feb. 7 press release, saying the service accounted for $31.4 million in additional Oscar-nominated film ticket sales, bring the total impact to $48.5 million.

When combined with $110 million tickets bought through the service – MoviePass pays exhibitors for every ticket purchased – since August 2017, and another $80.2 million in tickets by friends of MoviePass subscribers, total contribution reached $128.7 million.

Wedbush Securities media analyst Michael Pachter said the revised $48.5 million tally seems reasonable. The analyst contends MoviePass should only count tickets purchased by subscribers, and perhaps its subscribers’ friends will join as well if compelled to do so.

“The $128.7 million figure seemed impossible,” Pachter wrote in a Feb. 12 note. “It is simply disingenuous.”

The analyst contends MoviePass, which just topped 2 million subs, is trying to secure concession revenue sharing agreements with major chains AMC Theatres, Cinemark and Regal Cinemas, including $3 ticket price cuts.

MoviePass recently blocked access to select high-priced theaters in Manhattan, N.Y. in order to cut down on costs.

Cinemark operates its own subscription service, Movie Club.

“[While] MoviePass is surely saving significantly by blocking attendance at AMC’s 10 highest-cost national locations, it’s just a matter of time before AMC and Regal launch their own subscription services,” Pachter wrote.