‘Gemini Man’ Tops Redbox Charts

Paramount’s Gemini Man took over the No. 1 spot on Redbox’s kiosk disc rental and On Demand charts the week ended Jan. 19.

The Redbox disc rental chart tracks DVD and Blu-ray Disc rentals at the company’s more than 40,000 red kiosks. The Redbox On Demand chart tracks digital transactions, including both electronic sellthrough and streaming rentals.

The previous week’s top title, Warner’s Joker, slipped to No. 2 on both charts.

Another newcomer, Disney’s Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, was No. 3 on the disc chart.

Sony Pictures’ Once Upon a Time in Hollywood slipped to No. 4 on the disc rental chart and No. 5 on the On Demand chart.

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Lionsgate’s Jexi debuted at No. 5 on the disc chart and No. 4 on the On Demand chart.

STX Films’ Hustlers, distributed by Universal Pictures, was No. 3 on the On Demand chart and No. 6 on the disc rental chart.

Top DVD and Blu-ray Disc Rentals, Redbox Kiosks, Week Ended Jan. 19:

  1. Gemini Man — Paramount
  2. Joker — Warner
  3. Maleficent: Mistress of Evil — Disney
  4. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood — Sony Pictures
  5. Jexi — Lionsgate
  6. Hustlers — Universal
  7. Rambo: Last Blood — Lionsgate
  8. Abominable — Universal
  9. It: Chapter Two — Warner
  10. Angel Has Fallen — Lionsgate

 

Top Digital, Redbox On Demand, Week Ended Jan. 19:

  1. Gemini Man — Paramount
  2. Joker — Warner
  3. Hustlers — STX
  4. Jexi — Lionsgate
  5. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood — Sony Pictures
  6. Zombieland: Double Tap — Sony Pictures
  7. Rambo: Last Blood — Lionsgate
  8. Good Boys — Universal
  9. Angel Has Fallen — Lionsgate
  10. Abominable — Universal

 

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‘Joker’ Takes No. 1 Spot on Redbox Charts

Warner’s Joker took over the No. 1 spot on Redbox’s kiosk disc rental and On Demand charts the week ended Jan. 12.

The Redbox disc rental chart tracks DVD and Blu-ray Disc rentals at the company’s more than 40,000 red kiosks. The Redbox On Demand chart tracks digital transactions, including both electronic sellthrough and streaming rentals.

Sony Pictures’ Once Upon a Time in Hollywood rose to No. 2 on the disc rental chart and No. 3 on the On Demand chart.

Lionsgate’s Rambo: Last Blood, the top disc rental the past three weeks, dropped to No. 3 on the disc chart and No. 4 on the On Demand chart.

STX Films’ Hustlers, distributed by Universal Pictures, was No. 4 on the rental chart and No. 2 on the On Demand chart.

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Universal’s Abominable slipped to No. 5 on the disc rental chart and was No. 8 on the On Demand chart.

Lionsgate’s Angel Has Fallen was No. 5 on the digital chart and No. 7 on the disc chart.

Top DVD and Blu-ray Disc Rentals, Redbox Kiosks, Week Ended Jan. 12:

  1. Joker — Warner
  2. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood — Sony Pictures
  3. Rambo: Last Blood — Lionsgate
  4. Hustlers — Universal
  5. Abominable — Universal
  6. It: Chapter Two — Warner
  7. Angel Has Fallen — Lionsgate
  8. Ad Astra — Fox
  9. The Lighthouse — Lionsgate
  10. Good Boys — Universal

 

Top Digital, Redbox On Demand, Week Ended Jan. 12:

  1. Joker — Warner
  2. Hustlers — STX
  3. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood — Sony Pictures
  4. Rambo: Last Blood — Lionsgate
  5. Angel Has Fallen — Lionsgate
  6. Good Boys — Universal
  7. Ad Astra — Fox
  8. Abominable — Universal
  9. It: Chapter Two — Warner
  10. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle — Sony Pictures

 

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Digital Lifted Consumer Home Entertainment Spending to Record Heights in 2019

Consumer spending on home entertainment rose 8.4% to a record $25.2 billion in 2019, spurred by the at-home sector’s biggest growth engine, digital, according to DEG: The Digital Entertainment Group.

Subscription streaming, digital movie sales and digital movie rentals over the Internet all generated significantly more money than they did in 2018, DEG reported.

The trade association estimates consumers spent $15.9 billion on subscription streaming, which now accounts for 63% of the entire home entertainment market. That’s a 23.7% spike from 2018.

Digital movie sales, commonly known as electronic sellthrough, or EST, were up 5.1% to nearly $2.6 billion — while digital movie rentals through Internet services, such as FandangoNow, Redbox On Demand, Vudu and Google Play, were up 9%. This reflects “consumers’ continued engagement with VOD, increasingly through Internet services,” DEG reported.

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Consumers spent a total of $5.9 billion on buying movies and other filmed content, either on Blu-ray Disc, DVD, 4K Ultra HD or digital, DEG reported. That’s down 9.4% from 2018. Disc sales declined 18.2% to $3.29 billion.

Rental spending dropped 12.3% in 2019 to $3.4 billion, DEG reported. On the digital side, a la carte streaming generated $1.96 billion, down 6.2% from the prior year — chiefly due to consumers’ shift away from traditional pay-TV services. Disc rentals, meanwhile, slipped 19.5% to $1.44 billion, the biggest chunk of which came from kiosks, which finished the year with estimated sales of $884.6 million. Redbox leads the kiosk market, with more than 40,000 red vending machines, generally situated at large grocers and mass merchants such as Walmart.

Also on the rental side, Netflix’s legacy disc-by-mail rental business brought in an estimated $301.2 million, while the country’s waning number of video rental stores — once the home entertainment sector’s dominant revenue producer — collected just $250 million, a 21.1% decline from 2018.

On the transactional side, the top-performing movies included Disney’s Avengers: Endgame and Captain Marvel, Warner Bros.’ Aquaman and A Star is Born, and 20th Century Fox’s Bohemian Rhapsody. TV standouts included seasons one and two of “Yellowstone,” from Paramount; the “Game of Thrones” franchise, from HBO/Warner; Sony Pictures’ season four of “Outlander,” based on author Diana Gabaldon’s historical time travel book series of the same name; season nine of zombie series “The Walking Dead,” from Lionsgate; and season 12 of “The Big Bang Theory,” from Warner Bros.

According to DEG numbers, combined spending on disc sales and rentals was $4.73 billion, compared with $4.54 billion spent on electronic sellthrough and VOD, giving disc a 51% share of the transactional home entertainment market, down from 56% in 2018 and 62% in 2017.

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At the same time that the DEG released its annual year-end numbers, Universal Pictures Home Entertainment shared some of its “Attitudes and Usage” study findings.

The key point: Home entertainment has evolved into a true multi-platform business. Universal found that consumers are using around three platforms on average, the most common bundle being disc purchase, disc rental and subscription streaming.

‘Rambo: Last Blood’ Tops Redbox Disc Rentals, ‘Hustlers’ Is On Demand No. 1

Lionsgate’s Rambo: Last Blood remained at No. 1 on Redbox’s kiosk disc rental chart the week ended Jan. 5. The Redbox disc rental chart tracks DVD and Blu-ray Disc rentals at the company’s more than 40,000 red kiosks.

It was the third straight week Rambo: Last Blood has been the top disc rental.

STX Films’ Hustlers, distributed by Universal Pictures, was No. 2 on the disc rental chart but returned to No. 1 on the Redbox On Demand chart, which tracks digital transactions, including both electronic sellthrough and streaming rentals. Hustlers, in its fourth week, had previously debuted as the No. 1 digital title.

Rambo: Last Blood slipped to No. 2 on the On Demand chart.

Universal’s Abominable slid to No. 3 on the disc rental chart and No. 6 on the On Demand chart.

The No. 3 On Demand title was Universal’s Good Boys, which was the No. 9 rental.

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Sony Pictures’ Once Upon a Time in Hollywood stayed at No. 4 on the disc rental chart and was also No. 4 on the On Demand chart.

Rounding out the On Demand top five on both charts was Lionsgate’s Angel Has Fallen.

Top DVD and Blu-ray Disc Rentals, Redbox Kiosks, Week Ended Jan. 5:

  1. Rambo: Last Blood — Lionsgate
  2. Hustlers — Universal
  3. Abominable — Universal
  4. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood — Sony Pictures
  5. Angel Has Fallen — Lionsgate
  6. It: Chapter Two — Warner
  7. Primal — Lionsgate
  8. Ad Astra — Fox
  9. Good Boys — Universal
  10. Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw — Universal

 

Top Digital, Redbox On Demand, Week Ended Jan. 5:

  1. Hustlers — STX
  2. Rambo: Last Blood — Lionsgate
  3. Good Boys — Universal
  4. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood — Sony Pictures
  5. Angel Has Fallen — Lionsgate
  6. Abominable — Universal
  7. Ad Astra — Fox
  8. It: Chapter Two — Warner
  9. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle — Sony Pictures
  10. Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw — Universal

 

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‘Rambo: Last Blood’ Keeps No. 1 Spot on Redbox Charts

Lionsgate’s Rambo: Last Blood remained at No. 1 on Redbox’s kiosk disc rental and On Demand charts the week ended Dec. 29.

The Redbox disc rental chart tracks DVD and Blu-ray Disc rentals at the company’s more than 40,000 red kiosks. The Redbox On Demand chart tracks digital transactions, including both electronic sellthrough and streaming rentals.

Universal’s Abominable kept the No. 2 spot on the disc rental chart and rose to No. 3 on the On Demand chart.

STX Films’ Hustlers, distributed by Universal Pictures, was No. 3 on the rental chart and No. 2 on the On Demand chart.

Sony Pictures’ Once Upon a Time in Hollywood rose to No. 4 on the disc rental chart.

Fox’s Ad Astra, was No. 5 on the disc chart and No. 7 on the digital chart.

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Rounding out the On Demand top five were Lionsgate’s Angel Has Fallen at No. 4 and Warner’s It: Chapter Two at No. 5, which were No. 7 and No. 6 on the disc charts, respectively.

Top DVD and Blu-ray Disc Rentals, Redbox Kiosks, Week Ended Dec. 29:

  1. Rambo: Last Blood — Lionsgate
  2. Abominable — Universal
  3. Hustlers — Universal
  4. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood — Sony Pictures
  5. Ad Astra — Fox
  6. It: Chapter Two — Warner
  7. Angel Has Fallen — Lionsgate
  8. Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw — Universal
  9. Good Boys — Universal
  10. Overcomer — Sony Pictures

 

Top Digital, Redbox On Demand, Week Ended Dec. 29:

  1. Rambo: Last Blood — Lionsgate
  2. Hustlers — STX
  3. Abominable — Universal
  4. Angel Has Fallen — Lionsgate
  5. It: Chapter Two — Warner
  6. Good Boys — Universal
  7. Ad Astra — Fox
  8. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle — Sony Pictures
  9. Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw — Universal
  10. Ready or Not — Fox

 

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Streaming, Consolidation Dominate Top 10 Home Entertainment Stories of 2019

Streaming and consolidation dominated the home entertainment headlines in 2019, with the Walt Disney Co. leading the way. Netflix got some subscription streaming competition, and free streaming through advertising, or AVOD, emerged as a new star. It was also a year that saw the home entertainment industry lose a venerable studio player that had helped birth the business more than 40 years prior — 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment. Meanwhile, physical disc sales and rentals continued a structural decline, while electronic sellthrough, the digital sale of content, was a solid performer in the transactional business.

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Here are the top 10 home entertainment stories of 2019, as chosen by Media Play News staff:

  1. Disney Acquires Fox: Disney closed its $71.3 billion purchase of 20th Century Fox Film Corp. The deal included myriad Fox properties, including Fox’s interest in Hulu and 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment, which helped birth the home video industry in 1979. The merger also saw the departure of several executives, including Mike Dunn and James Finn at Fox and Janice Marinelli, president of global content sales & distribution for Disney’s direct-to-consumer & international unit.
  2. Disney + Bows: Calling it the company’s most-important consumer product ever, Disney CEO Bob Iger announced the launch of Disney+, a standalone SVOD service aimed at taking on segment pioneer Netflix and Amazon Prime Video. The service launched Nov. 12 at $6.99 a month offering a trove of catalog movies, including its venerable animated classics and Marvel hits, and catalog TV shows, in addition to original “Star Wars” series “The Mandalorian,” an instant fan hit from director Jon Favreau. Disney also unveiled the bundle offer of ESPN+, Hulu (now controlled by Disney) and Disney+ at $12.99 a month.
  3. AVOD in the Spotlight: Advertising-supported video-on-demand, or AVOD, emerged from the SVOD shadows, gaining traction among subscription-weary consumers looking for free content. Mega-media companies Comcast, Viacom (through the acquisition of Pluto TV) and Amazon (through IMDb) acknowledged the growing market. Reports surfaced that Comcast is eyeing acquiring AVOD player Xumo TV to go along with 2020’s Peacock streaming service debut.
  4. Apple TV+ Launches: Apple Nov. 1 launched a standalone branded subscription streaming service at $4.99 a month, Apple TV+, in more than 100 countries and regions through the Apple TV app. Original content included Golden Globe-nominated “The Morning Show,” “See,” “For All Mankind” and “Dickinson.”
  5. Electronic Sellthrough Continues to Grow: Outside of subscription streaming video, the only home entertainment category to post an increase in consumer spending during much of 2019 was electronic sellthrough, the digital purchase of movies and other content. The segment generated an estimated $1.9 billion in consumer spending through the third quarter of 2019, up 6.7% from the previous-year period, according to DEG: The Digital Entertainment Group.
  6. Redbox Gets Into Content, Out of Disney Movie Code Sales: Redbox launched Redbox Entertainment, a new label to acquire and produce content exclusive for Redbox’s 50 million kiosk consumers. The company tapped Broad Green Pictures and Lionsgate veteran Marc Danon to head content acquisition. The kiosk vendor also settled 2-year-old litigation with Disney, agreeing not to sell the studio’s digital movie codes.
  7. Filmmakers Tweak UHD: The UHD Alliance, along with leaders in consumer electronics, Hollywood studios and members of the filmmaking community, announced collaboration on a new viewing mode for watching movies and episodic TV called “Filmmaker Mode,” designed to reproduce the content in the way the creator intended.
  8. Netflix Takes a U.S. Sub Hit: Disaster struck Wall Street favorite Netflix after the streaming behemoth posted a 126,000 domestic subscriber loss in Q2 after projecting growth of 300,000 subs. It was Netflix’s first domestic sub loss since 2011 when co-founder/CEO Reed Hastings announced the short-lived separation of the company’s DVD rental business from its subscription streaming business. Regardless, stock plummet nearly 20% (or $26 billion) in value after the disappointing numbers.
  9. Changes Afoot at Vudu: Vudu — rumored to be up for sale by owner Walmart, which executives told The Information considers it a non-core business — quietly downsized support for its Vudu To Go/In-Home Disc to Digital app, effective Jan. 1, 2020. The digital movie transactional service will still allow users to convert DVD and Blu-ray movies for digital access by scanning UPC codes on the Vudu app via select portable devices such as a mobile phone and tablet.
  10. Netflix Hails Discs: Taking its eye off its dominant streaming business for a moment, Netflix acknowledged a milestone: Delivery of 5 billion discs since the launch of its legacy disc-by-mail rental service more than two decades ago. The disc rental: Paramount’s Rocketman.

Oh, What a Year — With Transformational Changes, Home Entertainment in 2019 Got Smaller — and Bigger

The phrase “transformational change” has been used so much it’s become a cliché — and yet there really is no better way to describe what happened in not just home entertainment, but also the entertainment industry overall, in 2019.

The completion in March of the Walt Disney Co.’s purchase of 20th Century Fox saw the number of major studios drop to five from six. Some of the home entertainment sector’s most familiar faces were suddenly gone, including Mike Dunn, the longtime leader of Fox’s home entertainment unit, and Danny Kaye, the visionary behind Fox Innovation Labs. Later, in the summer, Janice Marinelli, Disney’s home entertainment chief, also exited in a surprise move, given that she had opened an office on the Fox studio lot and was reportedly screening staffers.

In November, two new streaming giants emerged to take on longtime leader Netflix, Apple TV+ and, most significantly, Disney+.

Meanwhile, a new flavor of streaming gathered momentum: free to consumers, paid for by advertisers. Among the heavyweights jumping into what’s known as “AVOD” are ViacomCBS, with its Pluto TV acquisition, and Comcast Corp., which in December was reported to be in advanced talks to acquire Xumo TV, which boasts more than 140 digital channels of programming across 12 genres, including sports, news, kids and family entertainment.

The overall impact of all these developments on home entertainment: It got smaller — and bigger.

Smaller, because the traditional transactional business model that has defined home entertainment since its birth more than 40 years ago has increasingly come under fire, with subscription streaming, in particular, gobbling up more and more consumer attention — and dollars — that previously would have gone toward buying or renting movies, either on disc or through digital retailers.

But also bigger, because streaming, in its various incarnations, is now widely accepted as being part of home entertainment — which is now broadly defined as people watching what they want, on demand. There’s even a new name for all of this — direct-to-consumer — which was first adopted by Disney and is now used interchangeably with “home entertainment.”

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Bob Buchi, president of Paramount Home Entertainment, says 2019 “was the year of transition.”

“From media mergers and changing consumer viewing habits to the explosion of streaming services, the landscape has shifted dramatically,” he says.

The Nov. 1 launch of Apple TV+ marked the tech giant’s entry into the content business, with nine original series. One of them, “The Morning Show,” picked up several Golden Globe nominations from the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA), a first for a new streaming service.

Less than two weeks later, Disney launched its much-ballyhooed Disney+, with a full menu of in-demand movies and series — including the “Star Wars” spinoff “The Mandalorian.” Disney said more than 10 million people signed up for the service in the first 24 hours. By the end of November, the service had 24 million subscribers, according to estimates from Wall Street firm Cowen & Co. (Netflix as of October had more than 60 million domestic subs.)

“It’s an exciting time and we believe we have a unique and significant role to play,” Ricky Strauss, president of content and marketing for Disney+, told Media Play News on the eve of the service’s launch. “Disney+ will compete based on the unparalleled strength of our brands, the quality of our intellectual property, and expertise in high-quality video streaming.”

And yet industry insiders insist that despite streaming’s growth, there’s room for transactional — largely because new theatrical films, particularly the blockbusters, aren’t available on SVOD services. This distinction has prompted FandangoNow, one of the big digital retailers, to boldly proclaim on its home page, “New releases not on Netflix, Amazon Prime or Hulu subscriptions.”

“Because we’re the first point of entry for fans to see movies in theaters, and first at home, we’ve seen a significant growth among consumers who are excited to own movies as soon as they’re available digitally,” says Cameron Douglas, head of FandangoNow. “Fans looking for high-quality content right out of theaters, including 4K HDR movies, don’t have to wait until they arrive later on subscription services, and innovative deals like rental binge bundles and the availability on new platforms keep them coming back to transactional digital services like our own.”

“New movie releases continue to be sought out by consumers during the first window in the home amidst the frenzied buzz around new streaming services,” adds Michael Bonner, EVP of digital distribution for Universal Pictures Home Entertainment. “While there’s no denying the landscape is becoming more competitive, this business has successfully co-existed with abundant availability of non-transactional content for a long time and we expect it to continue to do so.”

“There is space — and demand — for both transactional content as well as streaming — just as there is consumer interest in both digital and physical,” says Amy Jo Smith, president and CEO of trade association DEG: The Digital Entertainment Group.

Beyond new releases, streamers have a limited selection of older films and TV shows, particularly with their increased focus on original content.

“For many consumers, their streaming options are good enough,” says Mark Fisher, president and CEO of home entertainment trade association the Entertainment Merchants Association (EMA). “But just like the days when the first video rental stores opened and made it easy for the consumer to watch anything they wanted to watch when they wanted to watch it, online VOD retailers offer that same opportunity to the consumer. I know that every time I see a montage of old movie clips, I’m driven to watch titles that aren’t new releases — and these are titles not readily (or easily) found on the streaming services.”

Sales of digital movies, in particular, were a bright spot, with consumer spending up nearly 7% in the first nine months of 2019, according to trade association DEG: The Digital Entertainment Group.

“We’ve continued to see growth in EST (electronic sellthrough) — both in our new releases and in our catalog,” says Jason Spivak, EVP of distribution, for Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. “Certainly the enhanced consumer experience enabled by Movies Anywhere is part of that, as is increasing consumer connectivity in their homes. EST continues to gain prominence in our marketing planning, release data scheduling, and retailer partnerships.”

Ron Schwartz, president of Lionsgate Home Entertainment, says Lionsgate EST revenue grew 30% this year, “four to five times faster than the overall industry. With increased collaboration between studios and retailers, and more offerings such as dynamic bundling, customers are starting to build their lockers up to 10-plus titles. Recent data shows that once a customer gets to between 10 and 12 titles in their locker, their EST purchasing behavior doubles.”

In addition to selling movies, digital retailers also offer them for a la carte streaming, the digital equivalent of a physical movie rental. Redbox remains the only retailer to offer both digital and physical rentals, the former through an e-commerce site and the latter, through a network of more than 40,000 kiosks situated outside (or inside) large retailers like Walmart, convenience and drug stores, and other retailers.

“Redbox owns the transactional space with more transactions across physical and digital formats — for rental and purchase — than any other transactional provider,” says Redbox CEO Galen Smith.

In 2019, he said, Redbox expanded its offering of 4K Ultra HD discs into new markets, and stepped up promotions as well, with its Back to the Movies campaign and a joint Dinner & A Movie offering with meal delivery service DoorDash.

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In addition, Redbox Entertainment, a new content acquisition and production division, has further transformed Redbox into a multi-channel content provider and programmer. Launched in October, the new division is headed by Marc Danon, who spent eights at Lionsgate, most recently as SVP of acquisitions and business development.

Disc sales in 2019 continued to decline in the low double digits, with DEG reporting that in the first nine months of the year, combined 4K Ultra HD, Blu-ray Disc, and DVD revenues were down 18.5% to an estimated $2.3 billion — exactly half what they amounted to five years ago, in 2014.

But studios continued to support the disc. And while a trend among smaller titles is to release them only on DVD and digital, bypassing Blu-ray Disc, major new releases are still getting significant marketing campaigns behind them, particularly for the 4K Ultra HD editions. The UHD disc also made headlines last August when the UHD Alliance, along with leaders in consumer electronics, the Hollywood studios and members of the filmmaking community, announced collaboration on a new viewing mode for watching movies called “Filmmaker Mode,” designed to reproduce the content in the way the creator intended. Filmmaker Mode, bowing next year, will allow viewers to enjoy a more cinematic experience on their UHD TVs when watching movies by disabling all post-processing (e.g. motion smoothing, etc.) so the movie or television show is displayed as it was intended by the filmmaker, preserving the correct aspect ratios, colors and frame rates.

“For the time being, 4K UHD is still the gold standard for at-home content,” says Jim Wuthrich, president of Warner Bros. Home Entertainment & Games. “With hardware costs dropping and television functionality such as Filmmaker Mode being made available next year, there is still a great value proposition in owning content in 4K UHD, both physically and digitally, as is still represents the best home-viewing experience.”

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“As evidenced by the exceptional growth of 4K UHD to date, it is clear that there is a sizable appetite for premium high-definition products, and that format plays a meaningful role in boosting retail traffic,” says Eddie Cunningham, president of Universal Pictures Home Entertainment.

Retail partnerships are key, Cunningham adds. “Given that physical and digital transactional consumption rates are remaining steady year over year and that disc purchases are making up more than half of that consumption, there’s no question that movie buyers continue to be vitally important to retail,” he says. “At no other time in our industry has it been more critical to ensure that we work together to retain the loyalty of movie consumers, creating urgency for our products and delivering the utmost value, quality, accessibility and convenience possible.”

 

Redbox Bowl Pits California vs. Illinois on Dec. 30

The second annual Redbox Bowl will take place Dec. 30 featuring the California Golden Bears vs. the Illinois Fighting Illini at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif.

Redbox took over the former Foster Farms Bowl as title sponsor in 2018 featuring schools from the Pac-12 and Big Ten.

The annual college football bowl game was first played in 2002 as the San Francisco Bowl featuring the Air Force Falcons against Virginia Tech from the Big East Conference.

Attendees last year (30,212) received a free one-night movie rental. The game was broadcast on Fox Sports paying out $3.6 million to Michigan State and Oregon. A similar payout is slated this year.

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“Redbox’s mission is to deliver quality home entertainment to everyone,” CEO Galen Smith said last year. “And it’s through shared experiences like football games and movie nights that we come together with friends and family for meaningful occasions.”

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Ash Eldifrawi, chief marketing and customer experience officer at Redbox, said most football fans live about 5-minutes from a Redbox kiosk and Redbox On Demand is available instantly, everywhere in the U.S.

“A post-game movie night is always within reach for football fans everywhere,” he said.

‘Rambo: Last Blood’ Takes Over Top of Redbox Charts

Lionsgate’s Rambo: Last Blood debuted at No. 1 on Redbox’s kiosk disc rental and On Demand charts the week ended Dec. 22.

The Redbox disc rental chart tracks DVD and Blu-ray Disc rentals at the company’s more than 40,000 red kiosks. The Redbox On Demand chart tracks digital transactions, including both electronic sellthrough and streaming rentals.

Rambo: Last Blood is the fifth film in the “Rambo” franchise starring Sylvester Stallone as the war hero who keeps getting called back to action. The film earned $44.8 million at the domestic box office.

Universal’s Abominable debuted at No. 2 on the disc rental chart and No. 5 on the On Demand chart.

Another newcomer, Fox’s Ad Astra, was No. 3 on the disc chart and No. 4 on the digital chart.

The previous week’s top On Demand title, STX Films’ Hustlers, distributed by Universal Pictures, was No. 4 on the rental chart and No. 2 on the On Demand chart.

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Sony Pictures’ Once Upon a Time in Hollywood slid to No. 5 on the disc rental chart and No. 8 on the digital chart.

The previous week’s top rental, Warner’s It: Chapter Two, slid to No. 6 on disc chart and was No. 3 on the On Demand chart.

Top DVD and Blu-ray Disc Rentals, Redbox Kiosks, Week Ended Dec. 22:

  1. Rambo: Last Blood — Lionsgate
  2. Abominable — Universal
  3. Ad Astra — Fox
  4. Hustlers — Universal
  5. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood — Sony Pictures
  6. It: Chapter Two — Warner
  7. Angel Has Fallen — Lionsgate
  8. Good Boys — Universal
  9. Overcomer — Sony Pictures
  10. Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw — Universal

 

Top Digital, Redbox On Demand, Week Ended Dec. 22:

  1. Rambo: Last Blood — Lionsgate
  2. Hustlers — STX
  3. It: Chapter Two — Warner
  4. Ad Astra — Fox
  5. Abominable — Universal
  6. Angel Has Fallen — Lionsgate
  7. Downton Abbey: The Motion Picture — Universal
  8. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood — Sony Pictures
  9. Good Boys — Universal
  10. Ready or Not — Fox

 

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‘It: Chapter Two’ Tops Redbox Disc Rentals, ‘Hustlers’ Is On Demand No. 1

Warner’s It: Chapter Two took over the No. 1 spot on the Redbox kiosk disc rental chart the week ended Dec. 15. The Redbox disc rental chart tracks DVD and Blu-ray Disc rentals at the company’s more than 40,000 red kiosks.

The second part of the adaptation of the Stephen King novel and sequel to the 2017 first chapter earned $211.6 million at the domestic box office.

STX Films’ Hustlers, distributed by Universal Pictures, was No. 3 on the disc rental chart but took over No. 1 on the Redbox On Demand chart, which tracks digital transactions, including both electronic sellthrough and streaming rentals.

Hustlers earned $105 million at the domestic box office.

It: Chapter Two was No. 2 on the On Demand chart.

Sony Pictures’ Once Upon a Time in Hollywood debuted at No. 2 on the disc rental chart and No. 3 on the digital chart. The comedic look at 1969 Hollywood earned $141 million at U.S. theaters.

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The previous week’s top rental and digital title, Lionsgate’s Angel Has Fallen, dropped to No. 4 on both charts.

The thriller Ready or Not, from 20th Century Fox, dropped three spots to No. 5 on both charts.

Top DVD and Blu-ray Disc Rentals, Redbox Kiosks, Week Ended Dec. 15:

  1. It: Chapter Two — Warner
  2. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood — Sony Pictures
  3. Hustlers — Universal
  4. Angel Has Fallen — Lionsgate
  5. Ready or Not — Fox
  6. Good Boys — Universal
  7. Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw — Universal
  8. Dora and the Lost City of Gold — Paramount
  9. The Lion King — Disney
  10. The Kitchen — Warner

 

Top Digital, Redbox On Demand, Week Ended Dec. 15:

  1. Hustlers — STX
  2. It: Chapter Two — Warner
  3. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood — Sony Pictures
  4. Angel Has Fallen — Lionsgate
  5. Ready or Not — Fox
  6. Good Boys — Universal
  7. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle — Sony Pictures
  8. Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw — Universal
  9. The Kitchen — Warner
  10. Dora and the Lost City of Gold — Paramount

 

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