Sling Freestream Adds Eight New Channels

Sling Freestream has added eight new channels, including dedicated dog programming, Broadway shows, high-stakes poker and coverage of the fastest growing sport in America — pickleball.

New Sling Freestream channels include:

  • Ace TV, offering action, adventure, mystery and drama;
  • Pickle TV, all about the fastest growing sport in America, pickleball;
  • The Red Green Channel, which follows a hapless handyman, Red Green, as he welcomes viewers to Possum Lake, Canada, where Red, his nerdy nephew Harold and other colorful characters film a do-it-yourself TV show;
  • Fido TV, a channel dedicated to dogs with original programming that includes episodes on specific breeds, training and behavioral issues, and rescue shows;
  • Lacrosse TV, the premiere multi-platform media network devoted to the sport of lacrosse;
  • MotoAmerica TV, curated by MotoAmerica, which features an extensive library of races and additional content of the Superbike, Stock 1000, Supersport, Twins Cup, and Junior Cup classes from throughout the series’ history;
  • Broadway on Demand, which provides fans with a 360 degree view of shows from Broadway, Off Broadway, West End, documentaries and more; and
  • World Poker Tour, which ignited the global poker boom with a television show based on a series of high-stakes tournaments.
     

With the addition of the new programming, Sling Freestream features more than 24 channels of free sports programming. In addition, the Sling Freestream library contains 24 entertainment-devoted channels with movies and TV shows. Sling Freestream now offers more than 275 channels and more than 41,000 on demand titles that are all free.

Sling Freestream is available through the Sling app on Roku, Comcast, LG, Samsung, Xbox and Vizio devices.

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The Card Counter

BLU-RAY REVIEW:

Universal;
Drama;
Box Office $2.66 million;
$22.98 DVD, $34.98 Blu-ray;
Rated ‘R’ for some disturbing violence, graphic nudity, language and brief sexuality.
Stars Oscar Isaac, Tifany Haddish, Tye Sheridan, Willem Dafoe.

Writer-director Paul Schrader’s searing The Card Counter is the latest entry into his canon of films that, as he describes it on the Blu-ray’s bonus featuertte, involves a loner in a room just sitting there waiting for something to happen.

In this case it’s Oscar Isaac as a man who goes by the name William Tell, a former soldier who was involved with the Abu Ghraib torture scandal and went to prison, where learned how to play cards. Upon his release, he travels to different casinos to eke out a living as a gambler.

The set-up is a bit like if the film were Rounders told from the point of view of the Edward Norton character, if he also had PTSD and wasn’t a manipulative jerk.

Tell runs across the son (Tye Sheridan) of another soldier whose life was destroyed by the scandal, and vows revenge against a commanding officer (Willem Dafoe) who was not punished at all.

The kid asks Tell to help him murder the commander, but Tell instead convinces him to tag along on the road to learn about the key to winning various card games. This is accompanied by voiceovers from Isaac explaining the rules and quirks of some of the games for those in the audience who don’t already know.

In their travels, Tell encounters La Linda (Tiffany Haddish), who makes a living staking gamblers in high-money games and then collecting a piece of the action. She recruits Tell to her stable to play in various poker tournaments.

All the while, Tell continues to be haunted by his past, which only adds to his dismay as he tries to dissuade the kid from his desire for vengeance.

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Isaac gives an engaging performance in what is a bit of an acting showcase, while Haddish plays against type in a departure from her typical comedic roles.

Schrader also keeps the film visually interesting with some good camerawork in the casinos, particularly one tracking shot over a massive room of poker tables.

The only extra on the Blu-ray is a five-minute behind-the-scenes featurette.