‘Stranger Things’ Still Leads Parrot’s Digital Originals Demand Chart

Netflix’s “Stranger Things” remained No. 1 on Parrot Analytics’ digital originals U.S. rankings the week ended April 29. Indeed, the top five digital originals remained the same from the prior week.

“Stranger Things,” a sci-fi fantasy series about the supernatural experiences of a group of young friends, posted a 6.57% fall in demand expressions, the proprietary metric Parrot uses to gauge a show’s popularity, tallying 52.6 times the demand of an average series. “Stranger Things” was No. 3 on Parrot’s list of overall TV shows. The fourth season of the series is set to debut May 27.

Remaining at No. 2 was HBO Max’s “Our Flag Means Death,” a comedy about a wealthy British fop who decides to become a pirate captain in the 18th century. The show posted 37.6 times average demand after a 3.68% drop in demand expressions.

Netflix’s “Bridgerton” remained at No. 3, with 34.3 times average demand after a 6.24% dip in demand expressions. The period drama from producer Shonda Rhimes is inspired by Julia Quinn’s novels and follows the eight close-knit siblings of the Bridgerton family as they seek love and happiness in London high society. Season two began streaming March 25.

The Disney+ Marvel series “Moon Knight” remained No. 4 with 34 times average demand after a o.86% drop in demand expressions. The Marvel Comics series, which started streaming in weekly episodes March 30, stars Oscar Isaac as a mild-mannered gift shop employee who finds he’s been given the powers of an Egyptian moon god.

The Disney+ “Star Wars” series “The Mandalorian” stayed No. 5 on the digital originals chart, grabbing 33.9 times average demand after a 0.88% fall in demand expressions.

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A “digital original” is Parrot’s term for a multi-episode series in which the most recent season was first made available on a streaming platform such as Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, Hulu or Disney+.

The No. 1 overall TV series in terms of online demand was “SpongeBob SquarePants,” with 71.7 times average demand.

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Media Play News has teamed with Parrot Analytics to provide readers with a weekly top 10 of the most popular digital original TV series in the United States, based on the firm’s proprietary metric called Demand Expressions, which measures demand for TV content in a given market through a wide variety of data sources, including video streaming, social media activity, photo sharing, blogging, commenting on fan and critic rating platforms, and downloading and streaming via peer-to-peer protocols and file sharing sites. Results are expressed as a comparison with the average demand for a TV show of any kind in the market.

Parrot: Netflix Share of Streaming Originals Dropped in Q1 as Competition Increased

Netflix’s demand share of streaming originals once again hit new lows in Q1 2022, sitting at 45.2% globally (down from 45.4% in Q4 2021) and 42.4% in the United States (down from 43.6% in Q4 2021), according to Parrot Analytics.

Meanwhile HBO Max, Paramount+ and Disney+ — all SVODs backed by traditional media conglomerates — saw significant gains in the most recent quarter. 
 
Global demand for original content from all of Netflix’s competitors grew 80.8% between Q1 2020 and Q1 2022, more than triple the 25.5% growth for Netflix originals over the same time, according to Parrot.
 

From Q1 2020 to Q4 2021, Netflix’s global subscribers grew from roughly 183 million to 222 million, a 21.3% increase in total subscribers. This is remarkably similar to the 22.8% growth in total demand global for Netflix originals from Q1 2020 to Q4 2021, showing the key link between demand for original content and subscriber growth, according to Parrot.

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The gap between the growth in demand for Netflix’s competitors’ original content and its own is further evidenced in Netflix’s market share dropping dramatically in the past two years — from 55.7% to 45.2% globally, and from 52.4% to 42.2% in the United States between Q1 2020 and Q1 2022.

Netflix’s global demand share for streaming originals is down from 50.2% in Q1 2021 and 55.7% in Q1 2020. Disney+ and HBO Max have grown from a combined 6.7% share in Q2 2020 (the first quarter they were both available) to 15.5% in Q1 2022. That 8.8 percentage point gain from these Disney and Warner Bros. Discovery owned streamers accounts for the vast majority of the 9.8 percentage point drop that Netflix has taken over the same time period, showing how much these traditional media companies are directly eating into Netflix’s streaming dominance, according to Parrot.

Netflix remains the dominant service for original content demand with its 45.2% global share, which is still larger than that of its six closest competitors combined — Amazon Prime Video, Disney+, HBO Max, Apple TV+, Hulu and Paramount+, which make up a total of 42.4% share globally. That said, its competitors are catching up — in Q2 2020 (HBO Max’s launch quarter), Netflix’s six closest competitors combined for 33.4% global demand share, while Netflix stood as 55%. HBO Max (6.7%) jumped ahead of Apple TV+ (6%) this quarter, as demand for “Ted Lasso” faded while Max launched a trio of hit originals targeting significantly different audience sectors with “Station Eleven,” “Peacemaker” and “Our Flag Means Death,” according to Parrot.

Netflix had a steeper decline with U.S. consumers, dropping from 43.6% in Q4 2021 to 42.4% in Q1 2022. Netflix’s U.S. share was 48.1% in Q1 2021 and 52.4% in Q1 2020. Paramount+ and HBO Max had very strong quarters in the United States, and accounted for much of Netflix’s losses in demand share in Q1 2022.  HBO Max grew from 6.2% to 6.9%, and overtook Apple TV+ in the category with a hits such as “Our Flag Means Death,” “Peacemaker” and “Station Eleven.” Paramount+ grew from 4.4% to 5% on the back of “Yellowstone” spin-off “1883,” as well as a new season of “Star Trek: Picard.”

Netflix is doing well in on-platform demand share, especially considering a plurality of demand for content available on Hulu is non-exclusive licensed content, which has less of an impact on subscriber growth and retention, according to Parrot. While there is currently a major drop from second to third place in HBO Max on-platform demand with U.S. audiences, a combination of HBO Max and Discovery+, which Warner Bros. Discovery leadership has repeatedly emphasized is in the works, would make up 18.3% share, just 0.4 percentage points behind Netflix. “This imminent platform combination represents a strong competitor to Netflix for second place in on-platform demand share, showing how much of a direct threat Warner Bros. Discovery poses to Netflix’s grasp on the entertainment habits of tens of millions of American consumers,” according to Parrot.

Disney+’s “The Book of Boba Fett” narrowly beat out Netflix’s “The Witcher,” both of which debuted in late December 2021, as the most globally in-demand series in Q1 2022. Netflix did account for four of the top 10 streaming originals with global audiences for the quarter, tied with Disney+, which also had four. While that is a strong showing, it still represents a significant decline from recent times. Just last quarter Netflix had four of the top five global originals, and in Q1 2021 Netflix accounted for seven of the top 10 originals worldwide. Once again, competition from traditional media — Disney+ in this case — is cutting into Netflix’s core areas of streaming dominance, according to Parrot.

‘Stranger Things’ Takes Top Spot on Parrot’s Digital Originals Demand Chart

Netflix’s sci-fi series “Stranger Things” led Parrot Analytics’ digital originals U.S. rankings the week ended April 15.

The series posted a 32% jump in demand expressions, the proprietary metric Parrot uses to gauge a show’s popularity, pushing it to 46.8 times the demand of an average series. “Stranger Things,” which was No. 6 on Parrot’s list of overall TV shows for the week, got a push from Netflix’s April 12 drop of a new trailer for its fourth season.

Dropping to No. 2 on the chart was Netflix’s period drama “Bridgerton,” with 39.5 times the demand of an average series, a drop of 15% in demand expressions. Inspired by Julia Quinn’s novels, the series follows the eight close-knit siblings of the Bridgerton family as they seek love and happiness in London high society.

Falling from No. 2 to No. 3 on the digital originals chart was HBO Max’s “Our Flag Means Death,” a comedy about a wealthy British fop who decides to become a pirate captain in the 18th century. The show posted 39.1 times the demand of the average series, a drop of 1%.

Disney+’s latest Marvel series “Moon Knight” tallied 34.2 times the demand of the average series to take the fourth spot on the originals chart, a 1% jump in demand expressions.

Meanwhile, Disney+’s “Star Wars” series “The Mandalorian” dropped from No. 4 to No. 5 on the digital originals chart, grabbing 33.8 times the demand of the average series after a 2% drop in demand expressions.

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A “digital original” is Parrot’s term for a multi-episode series in which the most recent season was first made available on a streaming platform such as Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, Hulu or Disney+.

The No. 1 overall TV series in terms of online demand was “SpongeBob SquarePants,” with 60.2 times the demand of an average show.

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Media Play News has teamed with Parrot Analytics to provide readers with a weekly top 10 of the most popular digital original TV series in the United States, based on the firm’s proprietary metric called Demand Expressions, which measures demand for TV content in a given market through a wide variety of data sources, including video streaming, social media activity, photo sharing, blogging, commenting on fan and critic rating platforms, and downloading and streaming via peer-to-peer protocols and file sharing sites. Results are expressed as a comparison with the average demand for a TV show of any kind in the market.

 

Parrot Analytics: Disney+ Second Only to Netflix in U.S. Originals Demand

Disney+ is the second-most in-demand platform for original series with U.S. audiences. and The Walt Disney Company is in first place in corporate demand share, according to data from Parrot Analytics.

Disney+ became the second-most in-demand streaming service for original content with American audiences for the first time ever last quarter with an 8.9% share, leaping over longtime second place holder Amazon Prime Video with 8.6%, according to Parrot.

Disney remains far and away the top media conglomerate in the United States when it comes to corporate demand share — a consolidation of original demand where platforms are combined based on their corporate parent, according to Parrot. Disney’s 20.1% share last quarter was well ahead of second place ViacomCBS (13.1%). Disney’s share is larger than the combined share of WarnerMedia and Discovery (12.1% + 7.1% = 19.2%), which are in the process of merging. Collectively, the six largest media corporations control almost three quarters of U.S. demand for TV series, while 27.4% of audience attention goes to originals from other platforms.

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Parrot also found:

  • Disney is in second place in overall demand for original children’s content.
  • Disney+ and Hulu originals accounted for five of the six most in-demand new series released in the U.S. in the last quarter.
  • Disney+ accounted for four of the 10 most in-demand digital original series with both U.S. and worldwide audiences last quarter. 

OTT.X Presenters: Online Viewing Growing and Services Proliferating in COVID Era

COVID accelerated online viewing, viewing habits are undergoing a big transformation, and the proliferation of OTT services has prompted the need to aggregate and partner, research presenters said at the OTT.X Fall Summit in Los Angeles Sept. 1.

“In December 2019, before the viewing uptake [with stay-at-home orders] we saw about 68 million OTT households watching about 6.4 billion hours of OTT content in a month,” noted Ray Yinger, director of marketing solutions at Comscore. “By June of 2021, this had risen to about 82 million active OTT homes watching about 8.3 billion hours of content through OTT. Though we see a bit of a dropoff after January of 2021 as some of the states began opening up and we began leaving our homes a little bit, the number of households who engage in various OTT services stays very strong. As the data show, the overall appetite for OTT content accelerated through the pandemic. More households than ever before now engage in OTT services.”

With the increased viewership also came an explosion of OTT services.

“As of the first half of 2021, there are globally 5,000 active SVOD services, more than 2,000 active AVOD and free TV services and over 1,200 transactional services available to the global consumer,” noted Marija Masalskis, advertising research lead at Omdia.

Consumers are finding services on smart TVs and other aggregation players.

“When we asked consumers how they found something to watch, flicking through channels and services came up on top, particularly among the U.S. consumers,” Masalskis said. “So what this really means is that you need to be available on these platforms that enable this new channel flicking, enable seamless discovery of content, enable consumers to just lean back and scroll through and find your service.”

Other partnerships are key, as they offer free-with-sub bundles and prime placement.

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“Partnerships with global telcos and digital aggregators are essential, not just for SVOD companies to subsidize their offering but also to AVOD companies, particularly as you see the emergence of connected TV advertising,” she said. “In fact, we expect TV to account for 25% of all online video spend by 2025. And we do expect that partnerships and alliances will be absolutely necessary to reach the scale that will enable AVOD services to compete.”

Another key is consumers’ perception of value. Consumers are willing to pay less and wait through ads, and the higher-priced premium model isn’t necessarily most profitable for services such as Hulu.

“The user that pays a smaller subscription price but is exposed to advertising brings in more revenue than the user that is on their most premium tier opting to pay more to not see ads,” Masalskis said, adding “they perceive that they are getting a premium service for a discount.”

Also, binge viewing may be on the wane as a way to attract subscribers.

“What we started to see recently is that acquisition shows are starting to have a weekly release and retention shows are being dropped as a binge,” said Renee Engelhardt, global director of partner insights at Parrot Analytics.

Streaming services aren’t the only beneficiaries of the new order.

Nelson Granados, professor of information systems and technology management, Pepperdine University, noted that in addition to video streaming, digital video rental is holding its ground and digital sellthrough is continuing to grow (8% from 2016 to 2021).

“There is a market for electronic sellthrough and it’s growing, so there is a market for downloading content and it’s steadily growing unaffected by SVOD,” he said.

YouTube and Google TV Using Parrot Analytics Data and Consulting

YouTube and Google TV are utilizing Parrot Analytics’ global audience demand data and entertainment consulting services, Parrot announced.

Parrot Analytics’ data products provide near real-time updates on the most in-demand TV series and streaming platforms in any market in the world, according to the company. The insights help inform YouTube and Google TV’s content programming decisions, Parrot announced.

“We are thrilled to be working with the world’s leading video entertainment and TV platform,” Parrot Analytics CEO Wared Seger said in a statement. “By sharing our expertise, data and consulting services in global audience demand, YouTube and Google TV will continue to evolve their content strategy based on the latest trends. We are excited to further our mission of helping more content owners and brands succeed on any screen, anywhere in the world.”

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Parrot Analytics is a global audience demand analytics company. The company helps clients with decisions in the areas of IP and content development, programming, distribution, audience and brand activation as well as global OTT strategy and operations.

Parrot Analytics: ViacomCBS Content Helping Paramount+ Competitors

High U.S. audience demand for ViacomCBS content is not being correctly leveraged to set up Paramount+ for success, according to a new report from Parrot Analytics. Indeed, ViacomCBS content is propping up the demand of Paramount+’s direct competitors, including Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime Video, according to Parrot.

In Q2 2021, ViacomCBS content had the second-highest corporate demand share of any media conglomerate in the United States, behind only Disney, according to Parrot data.

Meanwhile, Paramount+ was the sixth most in-demand streaming platform in U.S. audience demand for all on-platform content, and the seventh most in-demand streaming platform for digital original content.

“ViacomCBS has decided to go for guaranteed revenue now by licensing out its most in-demand series — such as ‘Criminal Minds,’ ‘NCIS,’ ‘Shameless’ and ‘SpongeBob SquarePants’ — to other streaming platforms,” wrote Wade Payson-Denney, press insights analyst at Parrot Analytics.

ViacomCBS content makes up 7.4% of the licensed catalog demand for Hulu, 24.8% for Amazon Prime Video, and 25.6% for Netflix.

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“Demand for exclusive content — both original and licensed — is the key driver of subscription growth and retention for streaming services, so if ViacomCBS wants to truly compete in the crowded SVOD space, they have to pull back their licensed content and make it exclusive to Paramount+,” Payson-Denney wrote.

In terms of corporate demand share (a consolidation of original demand where platforms are combined based on their corporate parent to show where audience attention is ultimately going), ViacomCBS (12.3%) was second place in the United States in Q2 2021, behind Disney (18.9%) but ahead of WarnerMedia (11%) and Comcast (10.3%).

ViacomCBS series are driving major portions of demand for other U.S. SVOD services. Around a quarter of all demand for licensed series on Netflix is for a ViacomCBS series such as “Avatar: The Last Airbender.” This is around the same proportion for Amazon Prime Video and Peacock. If all these series were reclaimed by ViacomCBS and made exclusively available on Paramount+, it would have a formidable library, according to Payson-Denney.

Nearly half of the demand for content on Paramount+ is non-exclusive to the platform, and the platform is significantly lagging in total demand for its original series, the report found. This is important because demand for exclusive licensed and original content is what drives consumers to subscribe to platforms, Payson-Denney wrote.

Parrot uses a proprietary metric called demand expressions, which measures demand for TV content in a given market through a wide variety of data sources, including video streaming, social media activity, photo sharing, blogging, commenting on fan and critic rating platforms, and downloading and streaming via peer-to-peer protocols and file sharing sites. Results are expressed as a comparison with the average demand for a TV show of any kind in the market.

Parrot Research: Demand for Emmy-Nominated Titles Has Grown Over Past Five Years

The average U.S. audience demand for TV series nominated for five or more major Emmys has grown 65.5% in the last half decade, according to new data from Parrot Analytics.

The demand for top Emmy nominees has grown from 11.3 times more in-demand than the average show in 2017 to 18.7 times more in-demand for this year’s top nominees.

In 2017 Emmy voters rewarded more character-focused drama and comedy series such as “Veep,” “Silicon Valley” and “Better Call Saul.” While these series did have loyal fanbases, they only cracked the lower levels of Parrot’s “Outstanding” category of audience demand.

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With Disney+’s “WandaVision” and “The Mandalorian” racking up a combined 13 major Emmy nominations (and 46 overall) and Amazon Prime’s “The Boys” getting a nom for Best Drama, 2021 is by far the Emmys’ most crowd-pleasing year of the streaming era, according to Parrot.

“Emmy voters have traditionally stuck with the same series and talent year after year when it comes to nominations, even if those shows or talent don’t win,” said Parrot Analytics senior strategy analyst Julia Alexander. “But the proliferation of streaming and increase in audience demand for genre shows across new platforms have become seemingly impossible for the Academy to ignore.”

Parrot: ‘Loki’ Beats Marvel Streaming Counterparts to Most In-Demand Series

“Loki” is ruling the Marvel Universe on the Disney+ streaming service.

The series became the most in-demand TV series in the world across all platforms just seven days after launching, a faster rise to the top than its fellow Marvel series “The Falcon and the Winter Soldier” (eight days post launch) and “WandaVision” (14 days post launch), according to data from Parrot Analytics.

On June 16 — the release of its second episode — Loki earned 89.9 times more audience demand than the average show worldwide. This was 29.5% higher than second place “Game of Thrones,” which has enjoyed a significant global resurgence in demand following HBO’s promotion of the Iron Anniversary back in April.

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On a time-shift analysis, global demand for “Loki” is virtually tied with “The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, while it is significantly ahead of “WandaVision.”

Seven days after their respective series debuts:

  • “The Falcon and The Winter Soldier” had 90.1 times more demand than the average TV series globally;
  • “Loki” had 89.9 times more demand than the average TV series globally; and
  • “WandaVision” had 67.6 times more demand than the average TV series globally.

 

This data and the speed at which “Loki” ascended to the top of the global rankings helps explain why Disney+ has moved from a Friday to a Wednesday release date for all of its new series, following the immediate success the programming shift had on audience demand for “Loki,” according to Parrot.

“Loki” is attracting a global audience. Parrot’s Global Heat Map shows, since launching, the series has achieved Outstanding demand in Australia and countries in Asia, Europe, North America and South America.

Parrot Analytics: WarnerMedia-Discovery Combo in Second Behind Disney in Audience Demand

The new WarnerMedia-Discovery entity is poised to be in second place behind Disney in audience demand, according to Parrot Analytics.

WarnerMedia-Discovery (16.4%) is behind only Disney (19.6%) in U.S. cross-platform audience demand, pushing Disney’s lead over the competition down to just 3.2%. ViacomCBS (15.3%) had been in second place before the merger was announced, but is now relegated to third. No other company comes within 5% of ViacomCBS.

“While the merger makes tons of sense from a cultural standpoint, more importantly it will allow WarnerMedia and Discovery to join forces, leap over ViacomCBS and close the gap with Disney in the increasingly competitive battle for audience demand and consumer attention in the United States and around the world,” Parrot analyst Wade Payson-Denney stated.

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The total demand for content originally available on a Disney property was the largest of all corporate demand shares. Disney has consistently had the lead in this race. In this scenario, Disney held a 4.3% share advantage over second-place ViacomCBS for the last month of available data. AT&T (WarnerMedia) was in third place — ahead of Comcast — while Discovery was in a distant sixth.

Parrot Analytics’ proprietary metric Demand Expressions measures demand for content in a given market through a wide variety of data sources, including video streaming, social media activity, photo sharing, blogging, commenting on fan and critic rating platforms, and downloading and streaming via peer-to-peer protocols and file sharing sites. Results are expressed as a comparison with the average demand for a show of any kind in the market.