Eddie Murphy Classics Coming to Disc and Digital From Paramount

The Eddie Murphy classics Coming to America and Beverly Hills Cop will come out on 4K Ultra HD disc, and Trading Places and The Golden Child will come out on Blu-ray, Dec. 1 from Paramount Home Entertainment in anticipation of the debut of Coming 2 America.

All four films will also be available digitally.

Newly remastered in 4K with HDR from a supervised restoration by director John Landis, Coming to America will be available for the first time on 4K Ultra HD with digital copy in a limited-edition 4K Ultra HD Steelbook with themed mini-poster, or on 4K Ultra HD digital. Murphy stars as an African prince trying to find a princess. The mission leads him and his most loyal friend (Arsenio Hall) to Queens, New York.  In disguise as an impoverished immigrant, the pampered prince quickly finds himself a new job, new friends, new digs, new enemies and lots of trouble. Extras (previously released) include the following previously released special features in HD: “Prince-ipal Photography: The Coming Together of America”; “Fit for Akeem: The Costumes of Coming to America”; “Character Building: The Many Faces of Rick Baker”; “Composing America: The Musical Talents of Nile Rodgers”; “A Vintage Sit-Down with Eddie & Arsenio”; the theatrical trailer and photo gallery.

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Beverly Hills Cop has been remastered in 4K with HDR and will be available in a 4K Ultra HD/Blu-ray combo pack with digital copy and is available now on 4K Ultra HD digital. Murphy plays Axel Foley, a street-smart cop from Detroit. Tracking down his best friend’s killer in Beverly Hills, Axel smashes through the local barriers in a hilarious, high-speed pursuit of justice. The 4K combo includes the following previously released special features: commentary by director Martin Brest, “Beverly Hills Cop — The Phenomenon Begins” (SD); “A Glimpse Inside the Casting Process” (SD); “The Music of Beverly Hills Cop” (SD); deleted scenes (HD); behind-the-scenes featurettes incorporating vintage 1984 interviews (HD); an isolated audio track of the original score by Harold Faltermeyer; “BHC Mixtape ‘84”, which allows viewers to go directly to the scenes featuring the hit songs “The Heat Is On,” “Neutron Dance,” “New Attitude,” “Stir It Up,” “Do You Really” and “Nasty Girl”; a location map; and the theatrical trailer (HD).

Newly remastered from a 4K film transfer supervised by director John Landis, Trading Places will come out on a limited-edition “Paramount Presents” Blu-ray Disc presented in collectible packaging that includes a foldout image of the film’s theatrical poster and an interior spread with key movie moments.  The film will also be available on 4K Ultra HD digital. In Trading Places, the very rich and extremely greedy Duke Brothers (Don Ameche and Ralph Bellamy) wager over whether “born-loser” Billy Ray Valentine (Murphy) could become as successful as the priggish Louis Winthorpe III (Dan Akroyd) if circumstances were reversed. Alongside the street-smarts of Ophelia (Jamie Lee Curtis), Winthorpe and Valentine are a trio ready for a revenge that culminates on the commodities trading floor in New York City. The “Paramount” Presents Blu-ray includes a new “Filmmaker Focus” with John Landis and access to a digital copy of the film, as well as the following previously released bonus content: deleted scenes; “Insider Trading: The Making of Trading Places”; “Dressing the Part”; “The Trade in Trading Places”; trading stories; an industry promotional piece; and the theatrical trailer.

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Newly remastered from a 4K film transfer under the supervision of director Michael Ritchie, The Golden Child comes to Blu-ray for the first time as part of the “Paramount Presents” line. The limited-edition Blu-ray Disc is presented in collectible packaging that includes a foldout image of the film’s theatrical poster and an interior spread with key movie moments. The film will also be available on 4K Ultra HD digital. In the film, Murphy is the Chosen One, a social worker on a madcap mission to find the Golden Child, a young boy possessing mystical powers. Joined by Kee Nang (Charlotte Lewis), they battle the countless henchmen of Sardo Numspa (Charles Dance), the mysterious and evil cult leader holding the boy captive. The “Paramount Presents” Blu-ray includes a new featurette on the making of The Golden Child, as well as access to a digital copy of the film and the theatrical trailer.

Roman Holiday

BLU-RAY REVIEW: 

Street Date 9/15/20;
Paramount;
Comedy;
$29.99 Blu-ray;
Not rated.
Stars Gregory Peck, Audrey Hepburn, Eddie Albert, Hartley Power, Harcourt Williams, Margaret Rawlings.

As this new “Paramount Presents” Blu-ray aptly demonstrates, 1953’s Roman Holiday manages to remain as fresh and vibrant as ever while simultaneously serving as a perfect time capsule of the era in which it was made.

In addition to just being a charming romantic comedy with a fun premise, the film managed to embody a number of significant elements of Hollywood history — not the least of which is the first major screen role for Audrey Hepburn, who snagged a Best Actress Oscar at age 24. Noted film critic and historian Leonard Maltin in the bonus materials calls it the greatest cinematic introduction anyone has ever had.

Then there’s the audacious decision by director William Wyler to actually shoot the film on location in Rome, rather than the more conventional practice of re-creating parts of the city on a soundstage in Southern California.

The delightful screenplay was largely the creation of Dalton Trumbo, though almost no one knew it at the time since he was blacklisted and attached his friend Ian McLellan Hunter’s name to it. At the time, the Academy offered separate awards for story and screenplay, unlike the distinct original and adapted screenplay awards offered today, and Hunter ended up as the named nominee for both awards on behalf of the film, sharing screenplay credit with John Dighton. It won for Best Story, an award credited to Hunter for 40 years until the Academy recognized that it was actually Trumbo’s Oscar.

Trumbo finally received an on-screen story credit during the restoration of the film carried out for its 2002 DVD release. The Writers Guild of America finally recognized Trumbo’s co-screenplay credit in 2011, so this new Blu-ray restoration offers the studio’s first chance to reflect that on-screen (the credits now attribute the story solely to Trumbo, with the screenplay by Trumbo, Dighton and Hunter).

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The story involves a young princess (Hepburn) from an unnamed European country who grows tired of being coddled and pampered during a tour of Europe when she can’t actually experience any of the places she’s visiting. So, during the Roman leg of the trip, she sneaks out the royal enclave at bedtime, despite her handlers drugging her to help her sleep. She ends up passing out somewhere in the city, where she is discovered by an American passerby named Joe (Gregory Peck), who ends up letting her sleep it off at his apartment after being unable to find a taxi driver who will take responsibility for her.

Joe turns out to be a journalist assigned to cover a press event with the princess the next day, but ends up oversleeping due to tending to the strange girl in his bed. He leaves her to sleep as he rushes to the office to try to bluff his editor that he conducted the interview, only to be called out by the fact that the event was canceled because the princess was “sick.” Recognizing her picture in the paper as the girl in his apartment, he quickly devises a scheme to sell an exclusive story about the princess to the paper.

When she finally regains her senses, the princess doesn’t admit to her true identity, but ends up unwittingly joining Joe and a photographer buddy (Eddie Albert) for a day of sightseeing around the city, thinking she is evading the royal guards sent to retrieve her when they’re busy chronicling her adventures throughout the city.

The idea of someone with a life of privilege wanting to experience how the other half lives was certainly not a new concept in Trumbo’s day any more than it would be today, but Hepburn’s performance as the princess makes her instantly relatable. Modern audiences accustomed to shows such as “The Crown” will be quite familiar with the responsibilities and expectations placed on royalty. Roman Holiday arrived in theaters not long after the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, who herself ascended to the throne at age 25, and the film’s timelessness is only aided by the ease in which one can imagine the young queen or her sister, chafing against the constraints of their duties, ending up in an adventure not unlike this one.

Given its simple premise, how it ends, and how Peck and Hepburn made such a winning duo, had it been made in the past 20 years or so Roman Holiday would be practically begging for a sequel. Yet, while there were supposedly attempts to make one, it never happened, though the story has been recycled quite a few times since then.

Paramount’s latest restoration of the film looks great, considering how poorly the film’s original elements were reportedly in — likely a factor of it being shot on location and using local European development houses. The new digital restoration techniques bring out a lot of detail in the black-and-white cinematography, with the only real fuzziness coming from stock footage newsreels the film itself originally used.

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For the film’s Blu-ray debut, Maltin’s seven-minute analysis of the film turns out to be the only new extra produced, though the disc still has plenty to offer, carrying over most of the featurettes from the 2008 DVD release.

These include a 12-minute Hepburn tribute and a half-hour retrospective of her work at Paramount, plus a 12-minute featurette about Trumbo (made years before the biopic with Bryan Cranston), and the nine-minute “Rome With a Princess,” which profiles many of the film’s shooting locations.

The disc also carries over a couple featurettes that are more about Paramount than Roman Holiday — owing that they were intended to be used on many of Paramount’s anniversary releases when produced in 2008. These include a five-minute piece on costumes that appeared in the studio’s films, and a 10-minute rundown of Paramount’s 1950s films.

The Blu-ray also includes previously available theatrical trailers and still galleries.

While the inclusion of most of the previous disc’s extras is a significant step up for the Paramount Presents label, which typically jettisons almost all previous supplements, fans should note there are still some notable omissions from previous Roman Holiday disc treatments, particularly the 2002 DVD.

That disc had a featurette about the restoration of the film that was done at that time, which carried over to the 2008 DVD but is obsolete now given the latest restoration, so its omission is understandable. Strangely, though, there is nothing about the new restoration to replace it.

Other supplements from that 2002 disc that didn’t make it to 2008, and are likewise still omitted, are a half-hour retrospective on the film and a 14-minute profile of costumer Edith Head. However, it seems to be Paramount Presents practice to only carry over supplements that are available in HD, so that might explain why those earlier featurettes didn’t even linger onto the 2008 re-release.

1999 Horror Movie ‘The Haunting’ Coming to Blu-ray Through Paramount Presents Oct. 20

Paramount Home Entertainment will release the 1999 horror movie The Haunting on Blu-ray through its Paramount Presents line Oct. 20.

Directed by Jan de Bont and based on the story by Shirley Jackson, The Haunting stars Liam Neeson, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Lili Taylor, Owen Wilson and Bruce Dern in the story of a doctor who lures three subjects to the foreboding Hill House mansion for a supernatural experiment.

The film has been remastered from a 4K film transfer supervised by de Bont.

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Extras include “Filmmaker Focus: Director Jan de Bont on The Haunting,” a behind-the-scenes featurette, and the film’s theatrical teaser and trailer.

As a Paramount Presents Blu-ray, the film will be presented with a slipcover that includes a foldout image of the film’s theatrical poster, and interior artwork highlighting moments from the movie.

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Airplane! (Paramount Presents)

BLU-RAY REVIEW:

Paramount;
Comedy;
$29.99 Blu-ray, $16.99 Steelbook;
Rated ‘PG.’
Stars Robert Hays, Julie Hagerty, Robert Stack, Lloyd Bridges, Peter Graves, Leslie Nielsen, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

Even though it’s celebrating its 40th anniversary, Airplane! Is one of those movies that just seems timeless. The comedy remains as funny as it ever has, despite the multiple viewings many viewers will have had of the film by now.

The story involves a passenger plane from Los Angeles to Chicago falling under trouble after the flight crew and many of the passengers fall ill due to food poisoning. The only other pilot on board is Ted (Robert Hays), the veteran of an unspecified war dealing with PTSD, and who is only on the plane to try to win back former flame Elaine (Julie Hagerty), one of the flight attendants.

Aside from countless sight gags, puns and deadpan recitations of absurd dialogue, the film’s great strength it spoofs the entire genre of disaster movies, rather than relying on specific pop culture references (though there are a few that will seem outdated, they are easy enough to move past considering the rapid pace of the gags).

But Airplane! also holds up thanks to its endearing characters and the memorable performances behind them. In addition to Hays and Hagerty, there’s Lloyd Bridges as the chief flight controller trying to keep the situation under control, to Peter Graves as the pilot hoping to impress young boys in his cockpit, to Robert Stack as the cocky pilot brought in to talk Ted through landing the plane. Then there’s Leslie Nielsen, former dramatic leading man whose late-in-life reputation for slapstick comedy roles kicked off with his pitch perfect performance as the dead serious doctor trying to treat all the passengers for food poisoning.

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The writing-directing team of Jim Abrahams, Jerry Zucker and David Zucker took special care to ensure that the touchstone gags were funny in their own right, not simply relying on audiences to recognize a reference to something that was popular at the time, as so many parodies of the past 10 years have done.

At the same time, film historians have had a field day picking apart the primary inspirations for the film. For the most part, Airplane! Is a remake of the 1957 air-flight disaster drama Zero Hour!, re-creating so many scenes and lifting so much dialogue verbatim from that film that the filmmakers ended up buying the rights to the original film’s screenplay. But the film also borrows heavily from 1970’s Airport and its increasingly preposterous sequels, even down to specific camera angles.

Interestingly, the original novel on which Airport was based was written by Arthur Hailey, who also co-wrote the Zero Hour! Screenplay. Maybe he should have received an honorary co-writing credit on Airplane! as well.

Ultimately, of course, Airplane! proved so effective at spoofing its source material that it’s likely to have a longer lasting legacy than any of the movies its aping. In fact, those older movies are now almost impossible to take seriously anymore without bringing Airplane! to mind.

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For its new 40th anniversary Blu-ray re-release, Paramount has cleaned up the film with a new 4K scan that makes the colors pop and brings out more textures and details than earlier HD releases.

However, the studio has continued its frustrating trend of eliminating legacy material for its new “premium” edition Blu-ray line. For those who don’t have the movie on Blu-ray yet, it’s an easy pick-up. But fans of the movie who want all the available extras aren’t going to want to switch out their older copies any time soon.

The only extra carried over from the 2011 Blu-ray is the audio commentary with producer Jon Davison, Abrahams and the Zuckers. The new Blu-ray does add an isolated track of Elmer Bernstein’s standout musical score (from this film to Ghostbusters and others in the 1980s, the veteran composer had picked up quite a reputation for scoring comedies).

Both these audio options are found not in the extras section, but in the audio setup section.

The two newly produced featurettes debuting with this Blu-ray are pretty good. The first is a nine-minute “Filmmaker Focus” mixing interviews with Abrahams and the Zuckers with clips from the movie as they recount the production. The other is a 35-minute Q&A with the directors filmed at the Egyptian Theater in Hollywood at an event held Jan. 10, 2020.

Missing from earlier releases are the trailer, a trivia track and the “Long Haul” version that offered prompts during the film for viewers to access deleted scenes, interviews and other bonus content. Surely some of these could have been repackaged as standalone extras.

Compounding the confusion is why Paramount would include a digital code with a less-expensive Steelbook edition containing the same disc, but omit the digital copy from the version with the standard Presents packaging that includes a slipcover with fold-out movie poster. It’s almost like a dare to not to buy the Presents titles.

Paramount Restores 1953 Classic ‘Roman Holiday’ for Blu-ray Debut Sept. 15

Paramount Home Entertainment will release the classic 1953 film Roman Holiday for the first time on Blu-ray Disc Sept. 15 as part of the studio’s Paramount Presents line. The film was subjected to an extensive 4K restoration by the studio, which showed off some of the results at an online press event July 15.

In the film, Audrey Hepburn stars as a European princess who escapes her secluded lifestyle and spends an adventure in Rome with an American journalist played by Gregory Peck.

“I don’t know anybody who doesn’t like Roman Holiday. It’s an irresistible movie,” said famed critic and film historian Leonard Maltin. “And unlike some ’50s movies that seem maybe a little heavy handed or maybe a little out of fashion by today’s standards, I think this one still breathes and exudes an air of freshness that is timeless. A lot of that has to do with of course Audrey Hepburn, who is eternally contemporary.”

Maltin said director William Wyler insisted on shooting the film on location in Rome, rather than building sets in Hollywood and matching the footage to pickup shots in the European city.

“Roman Holiday was one of the very first movies done on location,” said Andrea Kalas, SVP of archives at Paramount. “This was not a standard Hollywood thing.”

Both Kalas and Martin speculated that the production’s need to use European labs to process the film for dailies and editing, rather than more frequently used and reliable L.A. labs, might have contributed to problems preserving the film over the years.

The film was digitally restored using a dupe negative and a fine grain element to capture the best possible image. Every frame was reviewed, and the film received extensive clean-up to remove thousands of scratches, bits of dirt and other damage.  The original mono track was remastered and minor anomalies were corrected.

“Unfortunately, the original negative no longer even exists,” Kalas said. “This was a dupe made from the original neg which is what we primarily used, and that original negative was so damaged by that lab, just different standards … so that’s why the work we had to do was so important. Digital technology and restoration have become so nuanced and so specific that we can really make sure that we are doing the best with the material we have. So we’re really pleased with the way it came out.”

Progression of image restoration on a scene from ‘Roman Holiday’

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The film was nominated for 10 Oscars, including Best Picture, and ended up winning Best Actress for Hepburn, in her first major film role, Best Costume Design for a black-and-white movie, and Best Story.

The film’s writing award has been the subject of some revision over the years, which is reflected in the new Blu-ray as well. The new restoration also features one slight alteration from the original theatrical version, in that blacklisted screenwriter Dalton Trumbo receives a full credit for his work on the film.

Trumbo’s story credit was restored in 1992 by the Motion Picture Academy of Arts and Sciences, which in 1993 presented the Oscar with Trumbo’s name on it to his widow. In 2011 the Writers Guild of America awarded Trumbo a proper co-screenplay credit as well, shared with John Dighton, who Paramount hired to touch up the screenplay, and Ian McLellan Hunter, a screenwriting friend of Trumbo who fronted the script for him with the studio to get around the blacklist (it was Hunter who was originally handed the Best Story Oscar).

The new Blu-ray will be the first physical home entertainment release of Roman Holiday to feature both Trumbo’s story and co-screenwriting credits, both on the packaging and in the film itself.

Extras on the Blu-ray include the featurettes “Filmmaker Focus: Leonard Maltin on Roman Holiday,” “Behind the Gates: Costumes,” “Rome With a Princess,” “Audrey Hepburn: The Paramount Years,” “Dalton Trumbo: From A-List to Blacklist” and “Paramount in the ’50s: Remembering Audrey.” Other extras include theatrical trailers, plus photo galleries covering the film and its production, publicity campaign and premiere. The Blu-ray will also include a digital copy of the film.

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Films in the Paramount Presents line are presented in a slipcover with a foldout image of the film’s poster, and an interior spread of key movie moments. Other films available through Paramount Presents include Fatal Attraction, King Creole, To Catch a Thief, Flashdance, Days of Thunder, Pretty In Pink, Airplane! and Ghost.

Restocking the Shelves, Part One: Home Entertainment Divisions Mine Catalog as Theatrical Slate Stalls

When Paramount Home Entertainment on March 9 announced the launch of its “Paramount Presents” line to showcase films from the studio’s extensive library, marketing chief Vincent Marcais had no idea how prophetic the move would prove to be.

Just two days later, on March 11, the World Health Organization declared a global COVID-19 pandemic, and over the ensuing days governments the world over issued stay-at-home mandates and ordered the closure of all non-essential businesses.

Vincent Marcais

Movie theaters were among the businesses that suddenly went dark, which meant box office revenues quickly dropped to near zero. On top of that, productions were halted, which meant that not only were there no new movies in theaters, there were no more new movies, period, at least for the foreseeable future.

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Home entertainment, thanks to 90-day windows, got a three-month reprieve — as well as an extra crop of high-profile films released digitally to home audiences, at a premium price, due to the closure of theaters. But by mid-June, studio home entertainment divisions were running out of fresh new theatrical product, which had been their lifeblood since the home video business began more than 40 years ago.

So how are the home entertainment divisions of the major studios keeping the lights on?

At Paramount, says Marcais, EVP of marketing, the studio has been filling the void primarily with catalog product from its rich library of film and TV content, buoyed by the launch of the Paramount Presents line.

“The library is at the core of what we do here at Paramount,” Marcais says, noting that since the end of March weekly catalog sales have been double what they used to be.

Alanna Powers

“Catalog has always been important, but now it’s more important to us than ever,” adds Alanna Powers, SVP of brand marketing, catalog, at Paramount Home Entertainment. “We’re very well positioned to meet demand as new releases continue to dry up.”

With no fresh new theatricals in the pipeline, she says, “we have a very robust release strategy for our library. We continue to explore things like anniversary efforts, or leaning into historical dates or holidays, and we’re also looking at 4K Ultra HD, digging in and looking at opportunities.”

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On the digital side, Paramount works in tandem with digital retailers such as FandangoNow, Apple and Vudu to create curated promotions that are marketed primarily through Instagram and other social media channels, such as a collection of family films or series of dancing and singing movies that included Grease and Dreamgirls.

On the physical media side, the emphasis is on finding classic films from the vaults that have never before been released on Blu-ray Disc, such as Roman Holiday, and on the “Paramount Presents” Line — both of which target collectors.

The “Paramount Presents” line of Blu-ray Discs kicked off with the April 21 release of Fatal Attraction; 1958’s acclaimed Elvis Presley drama King Creole; and director Alfred Hitchcock’s romantic thriller To Catch a Thief, which celebrates its 65th anniversary this year. Subsequent waves have been released monthly. All films in the “Paramount Presents” line are remastered and sent to Blu-ray in collectible packaging that includes a foldout image of the original movie poster and interior artwork featuring key movie moments.

“This new label is really a labor of love,” Marcais says. “We’re like a publishing company, in that we take a very diverse group of movies from our library and we publish, or republish, them with the mindset of a really small shop where the focus is on quality.”

Like films in the vaunted Criterion Collection, Marcais says, “Paramount Presents” titles get the VIP treatment. “We go back to the filmmakers and find the best master and really work on the quality of the image,” he says. “We improve everything and then make these films available to the most important people for us — the core Blu-ray Disc fans.”

Paramount may have enjoyed the luck of the draw with the launch of its “Paramount Presents” line — as well as the already-scheduled May release of a special 35th anniversary edition of Top Gun — but other studios are reporting similar upticks in catalog sales, both on disc and digitally.

“From the outset of this unprecedented period, we’ve been seeing a broad lift across catalog,” says Hilary Hoffman, EVP of global marketing, Universal Pictures Home Entertainment.

Warner Bros. Home Entertainment has one of the biggest catalogs of any studio, buoyed by MGM, HBO and Turner product. EVP of sales Mike Takac says that during the first six weeks of the pandemic, when shelter-in-place orders were in place and businesses were closed, sales of theatrical catalog titles doubled.

“The COVID-19 bump was massive,” Takac says. “So now it becomes a matter of trying to predict how much of it will fall off as restrictions ease, and no one knows. But the second quarter was historic — we hadn’t seen such robust catalog sales in years.”

For Lionsgate, home entertainment’s moment in the sun is an ongoing thing. Home entertainment packaged media/digital movies at the studio represented 42.2% of the Motion Picture segment’s $1.67 billion revenue for the fiscal year ended March 31 — twice the percentage of theatrical, according to the company’s 10K fiscal filing, which was released May 27. The tally is up 14.1% from revenue of $1.46 billion in fiscal 2019.

Adam Frank

“Home entertainment has always been, and will continue to be, a huge priority for the company,” says Adam Frank, Lionsgate’s SVP of worldwide digital sales and distribution.

He says Lionsgate is in a strong competitive position because of the strength of its theatrical titles and the diversity of its slate, including a longstanding tradition of multi-platform releases. Between box office blockbusters such as the “John Wick,” “Hunger Games” and “Twilight” franchises and original hits such as Knives Out and La La Land, he says, Lionsgate has always filled in the gaps with a diverse portfolio of movies, some of which are released simultaneously across theaters and other platforms. With movie theaters closed, he says, films such as Arkansas and Survive the Night, aimed at home audiences, are posting “amazing results — they’re really outperforming our expectations and ranking in the upper echelon of multi-platform release performance, industry-wide.”

“We were well prepared,” he adds, “and we still have a number of those films that we have not yet released.”

Lionsgate also has a vast 17,000-title film and television catalog that studio marketers routinely mine in partnership with digital retailers, Frank says.

“We have always had an unrivaled dedication to our catalog,” he says. “We are coming off a record $600 million year in library revenue for our company, and we are now seeing weekly run rates up nearly 100% in recent months compared to before shelter-at-home orders.”

Editor’s Note: This is part one in a four-part series, “Restocking the Shelves: With No Theatrical Releases, Studio Home Entertainment Marketers are Getting Creative.” The complete story will be available in the July print and digital editions of ‘Media Play News.’

Days of Thunder

BLU-RAY REVIEW:

Paramount;
Drama;
$29.99 Blu-ray, $29.99 UHD BD;
Rated ‘PG-13.’
Stars Tom Cruise, Robert Duvall, Randy Quaid, Nicole Kidman, Michael Rooker, Cary Elwes, John C. Reilly, Fred Dalton Thompson.

Almost immediately upon its release in 1990, Days of Thunder was labeled by critics as a car racing version of Top Gun, a reputation that isn’t exactly unearned.

Days of Thunder shares the same production team of Jerry Bruckheimer and Don Simpson, the same director in Tony Scott, and also stars Tom Cruise, who plays another hotshot looking to fulfill his need for speed with reckless abandon.

In this case, Cruise’s character is named Cole Trickle, an Indy circuit washout looking to make a name for himself in NASCAR. He takes on the mentorship of a master pit crew chief played by Robert Duvall, but a devastating crash shakes his confidence.

Robert Towne’s screenplay (with Cruise sharing a story credit) throws not one but two rivals at Trickle. First is Michael Rooker’s Rowdy Burns, the top dog of the circuit whose career is cut short in the same wreck that impairs Cole. When they become fast friends due to shared misfortune, Rowdy asks Cole to take over his racing team, setting up the showdown with rival No. 2, another rookie driver named Russ Wheeler, played by Cary Elwes, whose blink-and-you’ll-miss-it introduction obscures a rise through the ranks so unexpectedly rapid that one wonders why the movie isn’t about him.

The requisite love interest, which like with Top Gun comes with professional complications, is Cole’s and Rowdy’s neurologist, played by Nicole Kidman, who was 22 at the time of filming lest anyone wish to question the likelihood of her character’s medical credentials. The swirling rumors of the day suggested Cruise became enamored with Kidman after seeing her in 1989’s Dead Calm and arranged for her to be in Days of Thunder so they could meet. When 1990 began he had been married to Mimi Rogers, but divorced her in February. Cruise and Kidman were married from December 1990, six months after Days of Thunder hit theaters, to 2001.

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For the most part, Days of Thunder comes across as a series of exciting racing scenes and establishing shots of NASCAR speedways strung together with a by-the-numbers plot and some perfunctory dialogue. Duvall is as good as he usually is, while Cole Trickle is such a stock character in the Tom Cruise mold that naming him is more a screenwriting formality than a necessity of the story.

This new edition of Days of Thunder is presented as both a standalone Blu-ray under the “Paramount Presents” label, as well as a 4K Ultra HD disc with digital copy. The 4K version doesn’t come with a separate Blu-ray Disc, which is something of a break from the industry norm of 4K/Blu-ray combo packs, so consumers will have to pick whether they want the higher-definition resolution of the 4K version or the fancy Paramount Presents slipcover with fold-out movie poster. The film looks great either way, particularly because the racing footage is so good.

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The new Days of Thunder Blu-ray seems to have avoided the fate of most of the other titles in the Paramount Presents line, which to this point has offered Blu-ray re-releases with most of the bonus materials from previous editions left out this go-around (it seems anything previously available only in SD got the axe, with maybe a new short retrospective featurette to replace it).  That’s because the previous Days of Thunder Blu-ray from 2008 had zero extras on it aside from the film’s trailer, so anything offered here is a step up. The extras, sparse as they may be, are the same on both the Blu-ray and 4K discs.

The new discs don’t include the trailer, but they do have a seven-minute “Filmmaker Focus” featurette which is essentially a retrospective interview with Bruckheimer interspersed with clips from the movie.

There’s also an isolated audio track containing just Hans Zimmer’s musical score, his first of many collaborations with the Bruckheimer/Simpson team. Zimmer’s music is a highlight of the movie, but compared with the rest of Zimmer’s works it comes across as one of the more generic efforts in a career built on establishing a baseline sound for reliable action cues.

Mike’s Picks: ‘King Creole’ and ‘Destry Rides Again’

King Creole

Paramount, Musical, $29.99 Blu-ray, NR.
Stars Elvis Presley, Carolyn Jones,Walter Matthau, Dolores Hart, Dean Jagger.
1958.
King Creole was, like most of Elvis’ pre-army screen outings, shot in black-and-white. But there was nothing stingy about the production, and the New Orleans locales that producer Hal Wallis sprung for add immeasurably to the ambience right from the opening, synching beautifully with the studio-shot material that makes up the bulk of the drama.
Read the Full Review

Destry Rides Again

Criterion; Western; $29.95 DVD, $39.95 Blu-ray; NR.
Stars Marlene Dietrich, James Stewart, Brian Donlevy, Jack Carson, Irene Hervey, Charles Winninger.
1939.
Destry Rides Again is likely the most respected film from director George Marshall, and also the best comic Western of all time.
Extras: Criterion’s extras are very cool, including Marshall talking about working during Hollywood’s formative years. And the insights from Donald Dewey, author of James Stewart — A Biography, are impressive.
Read the Full Review

 

‘Pretty in Pink’ Making Blu-ray Debut June 16 Through Paramount Presents Line

Paramount Home Entertainment June 16 will re-release the 1986 teen comedy Pretty in Pink on Blu-ray Disc for the first time as part of its Paramount Presents line.

Designed for collectors and fans, Paramount Presents showcases notable films from the studio’s library in collectible slipcases that include a foldout image of the film’s original theatrical poster.

Produced and written by John Hughes and directed by Howard Deutch, Pretty in Pink stars Molly Ringwald as a girl from a working class family and Andrew McCarthy as the rich heartthrob who asks her to the prom. But as fast as their romance builds, it’s threatened by the painful reality of peer pressure. The cast also includes Jon Cryer, James Spader, Harry Dean Stanton and Annie Potts.

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The Blu-ray offers the film ewly remastered from a 4K transfer supervised by Deutch. Extras include a new “Filmmaker Focus” featurette with Deutch and, for the first time, the film’s isolated score track from composer Michael Gore. Also included is the previously released featurette “The Lost Dance: The Original Ending.”

Paramount Releasing 40th Anniversary ‘Airplane!’ Blu-ray July 21

Paramount Home Entertainment July 21 will re-release the comedy Airplane! on Blu-ray as part of its Paramount Presents line to celebrate the film’s 40th anniversary. A limited-edition Steelbook Blu-ray also will be available.

Robert Hays stars as an ex-fighter pilot forced to take over the controls of an airliner when the flight crew succumbs to food poisoning.  The all-star cast also includes Julie Hagerty, Robert Stack, Lloyd Bridges, Peter Graves, Leslie Nielsen, and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. The film spoofs airplane disaster flicks, religious zealots, television commercials and anything else the filmmakers want to take aim at.

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The new Blu-ray will include the film newly remastered from a 4K transfer supervised by writers/directors Jim Abrahams, David Zucker and Jerry Zucker. Extras include a new “Filmmaker Focus” featurette on the directors, a new Q&A with the directors recorded at the Egyptian Theater in Hollywood in January 2020, an isolated music score by Elmer Bernstein, and previously released audio commentary with the directors and producer Jon Davison.