Google Agrees to Pay News Corp. for Content in Landmark Media Boost

In a major shift, Google has signed a three-year deal with News Corp., agreeing to pay “significant payments” to the corporate parent to The Wall Street Journal, Barron’s, MarketWatch, New York Post, The Times, The Sunday Times and The Sun in the U.K., among others.

The deal also calls for development of a news-based subscription platform and revenue-sharing deals for advertising, audio journalism and video journalism on Google-owned YouTube.

News Corp. CEO Robert Thomson said that the deal would have a positive impact on journalism around the globe having firmly established that there should be a premium for premium journalism.

Subscribe HERE to the FREE Media Play News Daily Newsletter!

“I would like to thank [Google CEO] Sundar Pichai and his team who have shown a thoughtful commitment to journalism that will resonate in every country,” Thompson said. “This has been a passionate cause for our company for well over a decade and I am gratified that the terms of trade are changing, not just for News Corp, but for every publisher.”

Google for years has been accused of distributing proprietary content from news outlets around the world for free via its vaunted search engine. Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. was one of the first media companies to fight back, erecting pay walls and lobbying government pushback against Google, including in the U.S. Congress. Similar deals with Google have occurred following government fines in France and Australia.

Thompson credited the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, along with the Australian Prime Minister, Scott Morrison, and Treasurer Josh Frydenberg, for sticking up news journalism and enabling providers the ability to get paid.

“The deal simply would not have been possible without the fervent, unstinting support of Rupert and Lachlan Murdoch, and the News Corp board,” Thompson said. “For many years, we were accused of tilting at tech windmills, but what was a solitary campaign, a quixotic quest, has become a movement, and both journalism and society will be enhanced.”

 

 

Tubi TV Integrates With Fox Media Down Under

Since Fox Corp. acquired Tubi TV earlier this year for $440 million, it has aggressively sought to meld the ad-supported VOD platform with its programing and management.

Tubi July 1 announced it has entered an exclusive ad sales partnership with Australian media company Foxtel Group. As part of this collaboration, Foxtel Media will serve as the sole ad sales representative in Australia for Tubi through 2022.

Subscribe HERE to the FREE Media Play News Daily Newsletter!

Headquartered in San Francisco, Tubi streams movies and TV shows from nearly every major Hollywood studio. The service has more than 200 million monthly views and is available in the U.S., Canada, Australia, and Mexico.

For Foxtel Media, which is owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp., Tubi adds a key free-to-the-viewer ad-supported component to its portfolio of live sports, lifestyle, entertainment content and news. In an advertising world that is increasingly powered by data targeting capabilities, Foxtel Media now straddles the fence marketing between free and subscription-based content distributors.

Follow us on Instagram

“Our collaboration with Foxtel Media delivers an optimally localized relationship and trusted team for advertisers in Australia,” Tubi CEO Farhad Massoudi said in a statement.

Mark Frain, CEO of Foxtel Media, says the technology behind Tubi has enabled the AVOD to rapidly build viewership across Australia and Mexico.

“We have the opportunity to connect brands and advertisers to Tubi’s outstanding proposition in this market,” Frain said.

Tubi is available in Australia on Telstra, Android and iOS mobile devices, Amazon Echo Show, Google Nest Hub Max, and on streaming media devices such as Amazon Fire TV, Vizio TVs, Sony TVs, Samsung TVs, Roku, Apple TV, Chromecast, Android TV, Xbox One, and PlayStation 4, and soon on Chinese Hisense TVs globally.

CNN Launching Digital News Service

WarnerMedia’s CNN property is reportedly readying a standalone subscription based news service that would target the news organization’s online  audience — and also pay third-party news sources.

The move comes after Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. subsidiary announced plans to launch Knewz.com, which seeks to aggregate third-party and original content.

As more people seek out world and local news online, TV news departments and print publications are melding operations internally with over-the-top video platforms to compete with social media platforms such as Facebook and YouTube.

While CNN lags behind Fox News in monthly pay-TV viewership, it bests the Rupert Murdoch property online with 130,000 more unique eyeballs per month than Fox, according to comScore.

“In the same way that entertainment companies don’t want to cede ground to the streaming platforms, why should we cede the ground of journalism to the technology platforms,” CNN digital chief Andrew Morse told The Information.