MoviePass Rival Sinemia Ceases Operations

Sinemia, the MoviePass competitor offering subscribers access to theatrical screenings for a $4.99 monthly fee, has ceased operations about a year after launching.

The Los Angeles-based service had attempted to piggyback on the initial success of MoviePass affording subscribers daily access to a theatrical screening for flat $9.95 monthly fee.

“Today, with a heavy heart, we’re announcing that Sinemia is closing its doors and ending operations in the U.S. effective immediately,” the service wrote April 25 on its website.

Launched by Turkish native Rifat Oguz, Sinemia sought to circumvent loss-leader pricing through up-front annual billing with revenue sharing with exhibitors.

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The service offered a two-ticket plan priced at $6.99 monthly (also billed annually); $9.99 for two tickets, including 3D, 4D and Imax formats; and $14.99 for three tickets, including 3D, 4D, Imax formats.

The strategy differed from MoviePass, which has attempted to circumvent exhibitors through a populous approach — with disastrous fiscal results.

The service’s parent, Helios Matheson Analytics, had its stock delisted by Nasdaq after investors fled MoviePass following tens of millions of dollars in quarterly losses due to an unsustainable business model, uncooperative exhibitors and frequent user policy changes, among other issues.

MoviePass reportedly has little more than 200,000 subscribers after once topping 3 million.

Meanwhile, AMC Theatres, the nation’s largest exhibitor, launched its own subscription service, AMC Stubs A-List, which earlier this year reached 700,000 subs paying $20 monthly fee.

Sinemia alluded to A-List for its decision to shut down.

“We are all witnessing that the future of moviegoing is evolving through movie ticket subscriptions,” Sinemia said. “However, we didn’t see a path to sustainability as an independent movie ticket subscription service in the face of competition from movie theaters as they build their own subscriptions. Thanks to the cost advantage and cross-sell opportunities, movie theaters will be prominent in the movie ticket subscription economy.”

AMC Theatres A-List Subscription Ticket Service Partners with Fandango, Atom Tickets

AMC Theatres A-List, the theatrical chain’s ticket subscription service and loyalty program, Sept. 17 announced a marketing partnership with online ticket services Fandango and Atom Tickets.

Under terms of the deal, A-List members who may use Atom Tickets and Fandango for movie tickets can now enter their A-List membership number during checkout, securing a ticket reservation with their membership, which is applied as one of the subscriber’s three-movies-per-week allotment.

A-List, which was launched this summer by AMC for $19.95 monthly as competition to MoviePass ($9.95) and Cinemark’s Movie Club ($8.99) subscription platforms,

Because A-List members receive the benefits of AMC Stubs Premiere, the online ticketing fee is waived. A-List subs can also purchase additional tickets in the same transaction on both sites, allowing them to bring along friends and family members to the movie.

“The guest feedback and membership sign-up rate have far exceeded our expectations, but we’re constantly looking for ways to provide more opportunities … through A-List,” Stephen Colanero, chief marketing officer, AMC, said in a statement.

Adding Fandango and Atom Tickets, the latter co-owned by Lionsgate, ups the profile of online ticketing across all platforms – and helps drive more moviegoers into their theaters.

“Fandango and AMC Theatres have worked together for more than a decade to innovate the moviegoing experience for AMC’s guests across online, mobile and social media platforms,” said Kevin Shepela, chief commercial officer, Fandango.

“Recognizing A-List membership is … a natural extension of our support for exhibitor loyalty programs,” added Matthew Bakal, cofounder and chairman of Atom Tickets.