Pluto TV to Add Spanish-Language Network Nuestra Vision

ViacomCBS’s AVOD service Pluto TV will add Nuestra Vision, a Spanish-language network featuring Mexican programming for Hispanic audiences living in the United States.

The channel will be featured within the Pluto TV Latino category — a dedicated lineup of more than 20 channels on the platform for U.S. Hispanic audiences.

“Through the exciting addition of Nuestra Vision to the Pluto TV platform, we continue expanding our distribution as part of our mission to reach our target audiences, with premium content directly from Mexico,” Victor Herrera da Silva, CEO of Nuestra Vision, said in a statement. “As audiences continue looking for new and affordable ways to consume their favorite content, there is a great demand to deliver entertaining premium content that is also easy to access, and free.”

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“As Pluto TV continues working towards our mission to entertain the planet, increasing our global reach and weaving cultural resonance into our programming is very important to us,” Amy Kuessner, SVP, Pluto TV content strategy and global partnerships, said in a statement. “This partnership will allow us to keep moving forward in increasing our appeal and availability to audiences abroad.”

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Nuestra Vision provides a family-friendly offering, featuring a large Mexican movie library composed of more than 2,300 movies spanning from the Golden Mexican Movie Era to recent productions. Nuestra Vision also features sports programming, including live games such as men and women soccer tournaments, football games, boxing, lucha libre, baseball, and MMA, together with sports news and content. It also offers news produced live, as well as shows and interviews with Mexican and international talent and celebrities.

‘Mommy’ Horror Films, Mexican Classics on Disc From MVD and VCI

Two horror films and three Mexican classics are coming on disc from MVD Entertainment Group and VCI Entertainment.

Available now on Blu-ray and DVD is the Mommy and Mommy 2 25th anniversary special edition double feature. The release includes the two horror films from the 1990s for the first time in high definition. Mommy is pretty, perfect, June Cleaver with a cleaver, and you don’t want to deny her — or her precious daughter — anything. Patty McCormack (Academy Award-nominated for her classic portrayal of The Bad Seed) stars in this thriller from the best-selling novel. The film also stars Jason Miller (The Exorcist), Majel Barrett, Mickey Spillane and “scream queen” Brinke Stevens. Special features include Leonard Martin on Mommy; the original trailer; bloopers; a PBS documentary; “Mommy’s Day,” Patty McCormack Interviewed by Max Allan Collins; and “The Making of Mommy.”

Coming Feb. 25 on Blu-ray are four Mexican classics.

In 1949’s A Family Like Many Others (Una Familia de Tantas), Rodrigo Cataño (Fernando Soler) runs his household like his own private kingdom, demanding obedience and respect from his submissive wife Doña Gracia (Eugenia Galindo) and their five children. This strictly maintained state of affairs is disturbed with the arrival of charming travelling salesman Roberto (David Silva), who convinces the initially resistant Rodrigo to purchase his newfangled household wares (first a vacuum cleaner, then a fridge) and enchants the family’s 15-year-old daughter Maru (Martha Roth). When Maru declares that she intends to marry Roberto, she defies not only her domineering father, but also the entire patriarchal order he represents. Long considered one of the key films of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema, Alejandro Galindo’s family drama depicts the tension between tradition and modernity that was gripping Mexican society at the time. The film is No. 36 on The 100 Best Movies of Mexican Cinema (Somos magazine) and was the Silver and Gold Ariel Award Winner, Mexican Cinema.

Available for the first time on Blu-ray produced from a new 4K restoration, 1946’s La Barraca is No. 21 on the List of The 100 Best Movies of Mexican Cinema (Somos). In rural Spain, a new family arrives in town to work a parcel (barraca), the townsfolk are very hostile to the idea of another working the land that once belonged to one of them. Though set in Spain and adaptated from an 1895 novel by the popular Spanish writer Vicente Blasco Ibánez (Blood and Sand), this story of an immigrant family’s struggles to establish their own small farm was close enough to the concerns of Mexico’s tradition of rural melodramas to become an immediate popular and critical success. In recent years, as part of a collaborative project, the Film Library of the UNAM and the AMACC (Mexican Academy of Cinematographic Arts and Sciences) have joined forces to restore and preserve Mexico’s national film collection. La Barraca is one of five films restored so far. The film won nine Silver Ariel Awards and one Gold Ariel Award, including Best Director, Male Actor, Female Actor, Screenplay and Cinematography.

For the first time on Blu-ray comes 1960’s The Skeleton of Mrs. Morales (El Esqueleto de la señora Morales), a 1960 Mexican black comedy film adapted from horror master Arthur Machen’s 1927 story “The Islington Mystery” by screenwriter Luis Alcoriza, a frequent collaborator of Luis Buñuel. The film is ranked No. 19 on the list of the 100 Best Films of Mexican Cinema (Somos). It tells the tale of quiet taxidermist Pablo Morales (former matinee idol Arturo de Córdova) who suffers the demands of his prudish and hypochondriac wife Gloria (Amparo Rivelles). After 20 years of a hellish marriage, he decides to murder her. Over the top performances and an ironic, final twist make this film by Rogelio A. González a timeless satire of weepy melodramas.

The 1968 horror film Even the Wind Is Afraid (Hasta El Viento Tiene Miedo) is a tale about a group of college students, led by Claudia, a young girl who decides to investigate a creepy tower at her all girl boarding school that has figured prominently in disturbing reoccurring dreams Claudia has been having. The dream also consists of a hanged woman’s body. They are suspended from the school for the antics, but Claudia learns from one of the female staff members that the person in the dream is a student who killed herself years before, and that the school principal knows more about the situation than she’s willing to admit. The tormented and restless spirit is hell-bent on enacting her revenge. The film was remade in 2007.

Mexican Melodrama ‘The Brute’ Set for DVD-Only Release

Facets Video has set a Nov. 19 release date for The Brute, a 1953 Mexican dark melodrama directed by Luis Buñuel and starring Pedro Armendáriz, Andrés Soler and Katy Jurado.

The film will be available only on DVD at a suggested retail price of $19.95, and will be available for preorder Oct. 29 at a 50% wholesale discount.

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Originally released by Media Home Entertainment, the film features a young man named Pedro (Armendáriz), who is dimwitted but immensely strong. He is conned into harassing tenants that his boss (Soler), a Mexican landlord, and his mistress (Jurado), want evicted. The brute has seemingly good intentions, but his acts of violence cause death and fear in those around him.

Facets Video is a subdivision of Facets Multi-Media, and is one of the largest distributors of foreign film in the United States. Its mission is to preserve, present, distribute, and educate about films.