Criterion Releasing Scorsese’s ‘The Irishman’ on Blu-ray and DVD Nov. 24

The Criterion Collection Nov. 24 will release Blu-ray Disc and DVD editions of director Martin Scorsese’s acclaimed mobster epic The Irishman.

The three-and-a-half-hour movie, which earned 10 Oscar nominations but didn’t win any, stars Robert De Niro as Frank Sheeran, a former hitman and union truck driver who reflects on his life in organized crime in the mid-20th century, from his involvement with Philadelphia mob boss Russell Bufalino (Joe Pesci) to his association with Teamsters union head Jimmy Hoffa (Al Pacino), and the rift that forced him to choose between the two.

The movie arrives on disc a year after its debut on Netflix, sporting a new 4K digital master approved by Scorsese, with a Dolby Atmos soundtrack on the Blu-ray.

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Extras include a newly edited roundtable conversation among Scorsese, De Niro, Pacino and Pesci originally recorded in 2019; a new documentary about the making of the film; a new video essay written and narrated by film critic Farran Smith Nehme about The Irishman’s synthesis of Scorsese’s singular formal style; “The Evolution of Digital De-aging,” a 2019 program on the visual effects created for the film; archival interview excerpts with Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran and International Brotherhood of Teamsters trade union leader Jimmy Hoffa; the film’s trailer and teaser; plus an essay by critic Geoffrey O’Brien.

Criterion previously released disc versions of Netflix originals Roma and Marriage Story.

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Apple TV+ Inks Movie/TV Production Deal With Martin Scorsese

Oscar-winning director Martin Scorsese has signed a production deal with Apple TV+ to create original movies and TV shows for the subscription streaming video-on-demand platform.

Scorsese’s last film, The Irishman for Netflix, was nominated for numerous industry awards without winning anything despite a cast featuring Joe Pesci and Robert De Niro  and Al Pacino.

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The Apple deal, which follows a similar deal with Oscar winner Leonardo DiCaprio, means Scorsese’s latest film, Killers of the Flower Moon, starring DiCaprio and De Niro, will stream on the platform following a theatrical debut sometime in 2021.

Apple has sought to significantly up its content profile since launching Apple TV+ on Nov. 1, 2019. The $4.99 monthly service has inked separate deals with Idris Elba and Ridley Scott, in addition to deals with Sesame Workshop and Peanuts brands.

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Apple Secures Rights to Next Martin Scorsese Movie

Apple reportedly has taken another major step in Hollywood, securing distribution rights to Martin Scorsese’s next major movie, Killers of the Flower Moon. The former Paramount Pictures title stars Oscar winners Leonardo DiCaprio and Robert De Niro, among others.

The Wall Street Journal, citing sources, reported Flower Moon — about Native American killings in Oklahoma — will be branded an Apple Original Film, with Paramount distributing the $200 million production theatrically and Apple streaming it on its SVOD platform Apple TV+.

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The acquisition follows Apple acquiring the rights to Tom Hanks’ World War II naval drama Greyhound from Sony Pictures.

Scorsese’s last movie, The Irishman, was acquired by Netflix, which marketed the movie staring De Niro, Joe Pesci and Al Pacino heavily for industry awards. Despite myriad nominations, Irishman didn’t win a single major award — which some observers contend had much to do with Netflix’s concurrent streaming/theatrical distribution strategy. Major exhibitors have refused to screen Netflix movies in protest.

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Netflix, Apple, Disney+ and Amazon Prime Video, among others, won’t have to worry about the Academy Awards requirement that a movie be screened theatrically in Los Angeles County for a qualifying run of at least seven consecutive days, during which period screenings must occur at least three times daily.

With Hollywood and movie theaters in shutdown since March due to the coronavirus, The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ board of governors last month ruled that for the 93rd Academy Awards taking place Feb. 21, 2021, movies that had a previously planned theatrical release but are initially made available on a commercial streaming or VOD service may qualify in the Best Picture award.

Expect Flower Moon, Greyhound and other streaming feature films to be in the mix for Oscar consideration as the year progresses.

Amazon Prime Video remains the first and only SVOD platform to win an Oscar for an original movie, Manchester by the Sea, taking home best original screenplay (Kenneth Lonergan, who also directed) and best actor (Casey Affleck) honors in 2017. Amazon also picked best foreign-language film distributing Iran’s The Salesman.

Can Netflix’s ‘The Irishman’ Avoid Awards Letdown at 92nd Oscars?

Netflix’s expansive marketing push for Martin Scorsese’ mobster movie, The Irishman, paid dividends Jan. 13 when the film was nominated for 10 of the streaming pioneer’s record-setting 24 Academy Awards nods.

The three-and-a-half hour movie was nominated for Best Picture, Supporting Actor (Al Pacino, Joe Pesci), Adapted Screenplay, Cinematography, Film Editing, Production Design, Costume Design and Visual Effects.

Whether the nominations lead to Oscar statues remains to be seen.

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Irishman was nominated for five Golden Globe Awards and Netflix’s chief content officer Ted Sarandos walked off empty handed. The film was nominated for nine awards by the Hollywood Critics Association Awards, winning Best Supporting Actor for Pesci.

The movie won Best Acting Ensemble at the Jan. 12 Critics’ Choice Movie Awards while coming up short in 12 other categories.

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Sarandos did get a photo-op with actress Laura Dern, who won again (after the Golden Globes) for Best Supporting Actress in Netflix’s Marriage Story. The movie received six Oscar nominations, including Dern for Actress in a Supporting Role.

Netflix Left $3.6 Billion at the Theatrical Box Office in 2019

Beginning in late 2018 through this year, Netflix has redoubled efforts to produce original feature-length movies in addition to episodic TV series.

At the same time, the SVOD pioneer continues to throw a curve ball into traditional theatrical distribution by largely eschewing exhibitor releases in favor of worldwide streaming access.

The result is friction from theater operators, industry awards groups and a significant hit to the fiscal bottom line.

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Netflix said its most-popular original movies from October 2018 through September 2019 included Bird Box (80 million views), Murder Mystery (73 million), Triple Frontier (52 million), The Perfect Date (48 million) and Tall Girl (41 million).

The streamer said movies such as Fyre, Otherhood, Always Be My Maybe, Secret Obsession and The Highwaymen generated more than 20 million views each within four weeks of release. The list excludes El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie (25 million) and The Irishman (40 million).

While 72% of Netflix households have more than one user on the account, when factoring just one view per subscription, the aforementioned movies generated about 394 million views. Netflix ended Q3 with 158 million subscribers worldwide.

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Multiplying the views by $9.11, the average cost of a theatrical movie ticket in 2018, suggests Netflix conservatively left more than $3.58 billion in ticket sales on the table over a film’s initial 30-day period.

That’s just slightly less than Netflix’s entire third-quarter 2018 revenue of $3.9 billion.

While it can be argued that streaming a movie for “free” is more likely an option for consumers than leaving the house and buying a ticket for a non-Marvel release at a cineplex, the data underscores users’ willingness to devote a significant time allotment for video content.

“The thing that’s amazing about that is … think of everything those people could be doing on those screens, and they chose a [Netflix] film,” Ted Sarandos, chief content officer at the streamer, told an industry gathering earlier this month.

Sarandos was talking about The Irishman, Netflix’s 3-and-a-half-hour big-budget gangster movie from director Martin Scorsese that has multiple Golden Globe nominations. “Consumers understand the value of proposition of new movie watching, compared with TV series,” he said.

Scorsese’s most-recent theatrical release, 2016’s Silence, earned just $23.7 million at the global box office against an estimated budget of more than $40 million. But before that, 2013’s The Wolf of Wall Street earned $392 million at the worldwide box office, 2011’s Hugo earned $186 million, 2010’s Shutter Island earned $294 million, and 2006’s The Departed generated $291 million. With The Irishman touting a typical Scorsese cast: Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci and Al Pacino, it’s not unreasonable the film would have attracted moviegoers.

Irishman was released in select indie theaters to be considered for industry awards, including the Oscars.

The Irishman lost a lot of box office,” Mooky Greidinger, CEO of Cineworld, said in an interview. “A Scorsese released properly in cinemas would have generated a nice income.”

Indeed, Netflix hasn’t been shy seeking third-party funding for its content aspirations. In October the platform sold more than $2 billion in long-term debt (bonds) in the U.S. and Europe to buttress original content production in response to growing third-party competition, including Disney+.

Sarandos: 40 Million Households to Stream ‘The Irishman’

Netflix’s big-budget mobster movie The Irishman is projected to be streamed in 40 million households through its first 28 days of release.

Ted Sarandos, chief content officer at the SVOD behemoth, disclosed the data during a Dec. 10 presentation at the UBS Global TMT Conference in New York City.

Sarandos said 26.4 million households watched at least 70% of the lengthy (3.5 hours) movie from director Martin Scorsese — a tally he said does not take into account multiple people watching simultaneously under one roof.

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Indeed, Sarandos seemed to imply anyone watching the movie in its entirety should be applauded.

“The thing that’s amazing about that is … think of everything those people could be doing on those screens, and they chose a film,” Sarandos said.

The Irishman generated multiple Golden Globe nominations, with Sarandos characterizing Netflix’s record nomination indicative the streamer’s “mark of quality.”

“Consumers understand the value of proposition of new movie watching, compared with TV series,” he said.

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‘Shutter Island’ Heads to 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Feb. 11 for 10th Anniversary

Martin Scorsese’s atmospheric thriller Shutter Island will arrive for the first time on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Feb. 11 from Paramount Home Entertainment for its 10th anniversary.

The 4K Ultra HD release will be available in a limited collector’s edition steelbook.

Based on the best-selling novel by Dennis Lehane, Shutter Island follows U.S. Marshal Teddy Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) as he navigates what appears to be a routine investigation that quickly turns sinister. The film also stars Mark Ruffalo, Ben Kingsley, Max von Syndow and Michelle Williams.

Special features include the previously released featurettes “Behind the Shutters” and “Into the Lighthouse” on the Blu-ray.

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Paramount to Bow 24 Republic Classics Curated by Martin Scorsese on Apple TV App

Paramount will release 24 rarely seen films from the Republic library, personally curated by Martin Scorsese and restored and remastered by the studio, on the Apple TV app for rent or purchase.

The titles are $4.99 EST/$3.99 VOD through Sept. 16.  After that, they are $12.99 EST/$3.99 VOD.

The films, part of the series “Martin Scorsese Presents: Republic Rediscovered,” were recently presented as part of a special screening series at New York’s Museum of Modern Art.

“From the ’30s through the ’50s, the different studio logos at the head of every picture carried their own associations and expectations, and for me, the name Republic over the eagle on the mountain peak meant something special,” said Scorsese in a statement. “There are so many titles that have been overlooked or forgotten; waiting for decades to be seen again. I can promise you that you have some discoveries in store.”

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While Republic Pictures was considered a ‘B’ movie studio, it gave great directors, actors and other talent the freedom to make movies they wanted to make, as long as they came in on budget.

“Thanks to the efforts of Martin Scorsese and The Film Foundation, audiences will see that Paramount’s work to restore these films has been done with careful attention to every detail,” said Paramount chairman and CEO Jim Gianopulos. “We are thrilled that these movies can be experienced once again in the way their filmmakers intended.”

The 24 films now available on the Apple TV app are:

  • Accused of Murder (1956)

David Brian, Vera Ralston, Sidney Blackmer, Virginia Grey

Director: Joseph Kane

When a gangland lawyer is murdered, there are two suspects: a beautiful nightclub singer and a hood named Stan, who has been hired by an underworld boss to assassinate him. House director Joseph Kane adapts the Republic crime film formula to the era of color and widescreen, employing Republic’s anamorphic “Naturama” process to intensify this thriller.

 

  • Angel on the Amazon (1948)

George Brent, Vera Ralston, Brian Aherne, Constance Bennett

Director: John H. Auer

A mysterious woman (Vera Ralston) leads an explorer (George Brent) and his party to safety after a crash-landing in the Amazon rainforest, in an extravagant John H. Auer drama with unexpected fantasy elements.

 

  • City that Never Sleeps (1953)

Gig Young, Mala Powers, William Talman, Edward Arnold, Marie Windsor, Paula Raymond, Chill Wills

Director: John H. Auer

In one night, a decorated Chicago police officer is gripped by an ethical crisis when he considers leaving his wife and job, and accepting a bribe from a corrupt attorney.  Documentary-like naturalism quickly gives way to nightmarish stylization under the direction of John H. Auer.

 

  • Come Next Spring (1956)

Ann Sheridan, Steve Cochran, Walter Brennan

Director: R.G. Springsteen

After a 12-year absence, a recovering alcoholic returns to the family he left behind and vows to win their hearts again. Tired of playing psychotic gangsters for Warner Bros., actor Steve Cochran started his own independent production company with the hope of tackling ambitious fare like this rural drama of redemption.  The film eventually landed at Republic, masterfully directed by R.G. Springsteen.

 

  • Driftwood (1947)

Ruth Warrick, Dean Jagger, Natalie Wood, Margaret Hamilton

Director: Allan Dwan

A young Natalie Wood stars as an orphan who helps a doctor (Dean Jagger) fight an epidemic in a small western town, in one of Allan Dwan’s closely observed studies in Americana.

 

  • The Flame (1947)

John Carroll, Vera Ralston, Robert Paige, Henry Travers

Director: John H. Auer

A man who is constantly jealous of his half-brother tries to con him by concocting a gold digging scheme with his girlfriend, only to have her actually fall in love with their mark.

 

  • Flame of the Islands (1956)

Yvonne De Carlo, Howard Duff, Zachary Scott, Kurt Kasznar

Director: Edward Ludwig

New York working girl Yvonne De Carlo uses money from an unexpected bequest to purchase an interest in a Nassau nightclub, where she installs herself as the host. Her vigorous interpretation of “Bahama Mama” and other Nelson Riddle-arranged hits earns her a wide-ranging collection of admirers, including a publicist, a gambler, and a philosophical angler.

 

  • Hellfire (1949)

Bill Elliott, Marie Windsor, Forrest Tucker, Jim Davis

Director: R.G. Springsteen

A reformed gambler turned preacher, partners with a pretty female fugitive outlaw, runs into an old pal who is also a marshal and they both fall for the same bad gal. Republic staff cinematographer Jack A. Marta uses the studio’s unique two-color Trucolor process to create a stylized world of shifting orange and blue.

 

  • Hell’s Half Acre (1954)

Wendell Corey, Evelyn Keyes, Marie Windsor, Elsa Lanchester

Director: John H. Auer

The notorious Hell’s Half-Acre quarter of Honolulu, Hawaii serves as a background to a complex tale of transgression and redemption. Wendell Corey is a reformed racketeer whose past catches up with him when his lover shoots and kills one of his former partners in crime.

 

  • I, Jane Doe (1948)

Ruth Hussey, John Carroll, Vera Ralston

Director: John H. Auer

During World War II, an American pilot marries his French girlfriend but then leaves without her. What she does not know is that he is already married in the United States, so she sets out on a mission to find him with disastrous results.

 

  • The Inside Story (1948)

Marsha Hunt, William Lundigan, Charles Winninger

Director: Allan Dwan

A heartwarming lesson in economics from director Allan Dwan in which a stack of cash miraculously finds its way to a small town struggling during the Depression.  The incident affects the lives of everyone who finds it, with various results.

 

  • I’ve Always Loved You (1946)

Philip Dorn, Catherine McLeod, William Carter

Director: Frank Borzage

An orchestral conductor engages in a merciless professional rivalry with a piano student who adores him. Republic made a rare foray into high-budget filmmaking with this 1946 prestige production containing color by Technicolor, piano solos by Arthur Rubinstein, and direction by A-lister Frank Borzage.

 

  • Johnny Guitar (1954)

Joan Crawford, Sterling Hayden, Mercedes McCambridge

Director: Nicholas Ray

From acclaimed director Nicholas Ray, a gambling house operator seeks control of a town as an archrival sets out to force her out of town. The timely arrival of Johnny Guitar thwarts the dark plans, but does not prevent a showdown between the women. The Library of Congress selected this cult classic for preservation in the National Film Registry.

 

  • Laughing Anne (1953)

Wendell Corey, Margaret Lockwood, Forrest Tucker

Director: Herbert Wilcox

Laughing Anne is a Parisian club singer torn between two sailors on the tumultuous South Seas. Based on Joseph Conrad’s novel “Between the Tides” and produced and directed by Herbert Wilcox.

 

  • Moonrise (1948)

Dane Clark, Gail Russell, Ethel Barrymore

Director: Frank Borzage

The locals shun the son of a murderer; only one person defends him, but she happens to be the girlfriend of his chief tormentor. After a confrontation, he kills his bully in self-defense but then becomes tormented by the fact that he may be following in his father’s footsteps.

 

  • The Outcast (1954)

John Derek, Joan Evans, Jim Davis, Catherine McLeod

Director: William Witney

Cheated out of his inheritance by his uncle, a man is outcast from his community and vows to take revenge, in this 1880’s actioner directed by William Witney.

 

  • The Quiet Man (1952)

John Wayne, Maureen O’Hara, Barry Fitzgerald

Director: John Ford

The Oscar®-winning John Ford classic features John Wayne as a retired boxer who makes a pilgrimage to his home village in Ireland. He meets his match in a spirited young woman, only to find himself confronted by her belligerent brother and the town’s strict customs.  In 2002, the film made AFI’s list of one hundred greatest love stories.

 

  • The Red Pony (1949)

Myrna Loy, Robert Mitchum, Margaret Hamilton, Beau Bridges

Director: Lewis Milestone

John Steinbeck adapted his own novella for this 1949 feature, Republic’s most expensive film up to that time. Robert Mitchum is the ranch hand who helps his employer’s son cope with the death of the pony he raised.  The original score is by Aaron Copland, which he also arranged and published as an orchestral suite.

 

  • Storm Over Lisbon (1944)

Vera Ralston, Richard Arlen, Erich von Stroheim

Director: George Sherman

Director of photography: John Alton

The owner of a Portugal nightclub works as a freelance spy. He tries to seduce information out of a US agent with the help of his nightclub dancer, but when she falls for the agent, both of their lives are endangered.

 

  • Stranger at My Door (1956)

Macdonald Carey, Patricia Medina, Skip Homeier

Director: William Witney

An escaping bank robber finds refuge with a preacher and his wife. The preacher believes he can be reformed but soon finds the robber more trouble than he’s worth.

 

  • That Brennan Girl (1946)

James Dunn, Mona Freeman, William Marshall

Director: Alfred Santell

A selfish San Franciscan with a rough childhood loses a husband in the war and becomes a single mother, forcing her to grow up fast. Unaccountably overlooked, this resonant, formally inventive film was the final work of director Alfred Santell as well as the last leading role of Oscar-winner James Dunn.

 

  • Three Faces West (1940)

John Wayne, Sigrid Gurie, Charles Coburn

Director: Bernard Vorhaus

A Viennese physician and his daughter, refugees from Hitler, become part of a group of North Dakota townspeople planning to relocate from the dust bowl to greener Oregon.

 

  • Trigger, Jr. (1950)

Roy Rogers, Dale Evans, Peter Miles

Director: William Witney

A prime example of Republic’s Saturday-matinee musical Westerns, Roy Rogers and Trigger are joined by Trigger’s dashing offspring as they try to save a traveling circus from bankruptcy.

 

  • Wake of the Red Witch (1948)

John Wayne, Gail Russell, Gig Young

Director: Edward Ludwig

A ship captain experiences rough weather, sunken treasure, and a giant octopus on the South Pacific seas. This film was one of Republic’s most expensive productions—and, in the end, one of its most successful.

Netflix’s ‘Irishman’ Skipping Major Theatrical Run

Netflix’s big budget original movie The Irishman reportedly will not have a major theatrical run upon its November release.

The Martin Scorsese-directed gangster movie features multiple Oscar winners, including Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci and Al Pacino, among others.

Netflix is eyeing the film for major industry awards, which require a theatrical screening to be considered for nomination.

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The SVOD pioneer continues to maintain a business model that makes original movies available for streaming concurrent with any theatrical run.

To abide by the rules, Netflix has offered The Irishman to theaters for an exclusive 27-day window ahead of streaming, beginning Nov. 1.

But major chains such as AMC, Regal and Landmark insist they have exclusive rights to any theatrical release for 90 days.

As a result, Netflix will screen the film at select indie theaters nationwide — a path the service took when debuting  last year’s Oscar-winning movie Roma from director Alfonso Cuaron.

 

Netflix’s ‘The Irishman’ Gets Global Debut at London Film Festival

The BFI London Film Festival scored a coup of sorts Aug. 5 when it announced that the upcoming 63rd edition would play host to the global debut of Netflix original feature film The Irishman from director Martin Scorsese.

Netflix — contrary to the SVOD’s feature-film policy releasing titles in theaters and streaming concurrently — is rolling out the mega-budget movie in select theaters first to appease industry awards such as the Academy Awards as well as Oscar-winner Scorsese.

Irishman, which will be screened Oct. 13 at the festival’s “Closing Night Gala,” stars Academy Award winners Robert De Niro, Al Pacino and Joe Pesci, among others.

The screening apparently precedes a previously-announced Irishman debut at the New York Film Festival on Oct. 14.

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Netflix has not yet announced the streaming release for the film.

The BFI London Film Festival also announced that there would be simultaneous preview screenings taking place at cinemas across the UK.

Re-uniting Scorsese with his Gangs of New York screenwriter Steve Zaillian, who adapted from Charles Brandt’s novel I Heard You Paint Houses, The Irishman examines the influence of organized crime in post-war America.

The story is told through the eyes of World War II veteran Frank Sheeran (De Niro), a hustler and hitman who worked alongside some of the most notorious figures of the 20th Century.

Spanning decades, the film chronicles one of the greatest unsolved mysteries in American history, the disappearance of infamous Union President Jimmy Hoffa, and offers a monumental journey through the hidden corridors of organized crime: its inner workings, rivalries and connections to mainstream politics.

“I’m extremely honored to be having the International Premiere of The Irishman at the closing night of the BFI London Film Festival,” Scorsese said in a statement. “This picture was many years in the making. It’s a project that Robert De Niro and I started talking about a long time ago, and we wanted to make it the way it needed to be made. It’s also a picture that all of us could only have made at this point in our lives.”

Tricia Tuttle, BFI London Film Festival Director hailed Scorsese as “one of the true greats of cinema” as both a creator and champion of film preservation and history.

“This is a major occasion for film lovers and I cannot wait to share this film with U.K.,” Tuttle said.