‘Fox Nation’ SVOD Service Goes Live

Fox Nation, the $5.99 subscription streaming video service, officially launches today (Nov. 27) offering “Fox & Friends”-style conservative commentary, opinions, documentaries and related content (“Cooking with Steve Doocy,” a Fox News host) for streamers who like their entertainment red-state.

New programs include “First Thoughts” and “Final Thoughts” featuring online siren Tomi Lahren, and “Un-PC” talk show, co-hosted by Britt McHenry, the former ESPN reporter infamously suspended in 2015 after an ugly video of her dressing down a towing-lot attendant went viral.

John Finley, SVP of development and production at Fox News, characterizes Fox Nation as a mixture of Netflix and Facebook Live, featuring similar content options — but geared toward the Fox News demographic that helped put Donald Trump in the White House.

“We have fans, other news organizations simply have viewers,” Finley told The New York Times.

Fox News has become basic cable’s most-watched network averaging 1.4 million viewers during the day; 2.4 million during 8-11 p.m. prime time hours, according to Nielsen — a ratings reality the network has championed for more than two years.

“It’s another way to service and provide content to our most dedicated fans,” Finley said. “We can give them an infinite amount of content.”

But not 24/7.

Fox Nation, which will feature many Fox News on-air talent, including Sean Hannity, Tucker Carlson and Laura Ingraham (but reportedly not Chris Wallace and Shepard Smith), will cease all live programming at 7 p.m. — the time when Fox News begins its prime-time lineup.

Indeed, Fox News remains a revenue machine for corporate parent 21st Century Fox, generating more than $1 billion annually in ad-sales. The unit was not part of Fox’s $71 billion 20th Century Film Corp.’s sale to The Walt Disney Co.

 

Hulu Pulls Ads From ‘The Laura Ingraham Show’

Hulu has pulled TV commercials from “The Laura Ingraham Show” on Fox News following the conservative host’s tweets mocking a high school student survivor of the recent Parkland, Fla., shooting.

“We’d like to confirm that we are no longer advertising on Laura Ingraham’s and are monitoring all of our ad placements carefully,” Hulu said in a March 29 Twitter post.

The subscription streaming video service, co-owned by The Walt Disney Co., 21st Century Fox, Comcast and Time Warner, joined a growing group of advertisers (including TripAdvisor, Expedia, Wayfair and Johnson & Johnson) that have pulled spots.

The controversy involves David Hogg, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, who survived the Valentine’s Day (Feb. 14) mass shooting where gunman (and former student) Nikolas Cruz allegedly killed 14 students and three teachers with an assault weapon.

Hogg, along with other students, has become a face of the tragedy and emerging gun control activist, speaking out on national media. He is a founding member, along with 19 other students, of the “Never Again MSD” advocacy group that has spearheaded movements against gun violence, including the March 24 “March for Our Lives” demonstration that attracted hundreds of thousands of protesters nationwide.

Ingraham, along with other conservatives in the media, have criticized Hogg as a mouthpiece of a liberal agenda aimed at curbing gun rights they claim are guaranteed under the 2nd Amendment of the Constitution.

But Ingraham went one step further, attacking Hogg personally on social media.

The former MSNBC host, who worked as a speech writer for President Reagan, clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and guest-hosted the former “The O’Reilly Factor” on Fox News, called Hogg a “whiner” for not getting accepted into UCLA, despite reportedly having a 4.1 grade point average.

“David Hogg Rejected By Four Colleges To Which He Applied and whines about it. (Dinged by UCLA with a 4.1 GPA…totally predictable given acceptance rates.),” Ingraham tweeted, linking it to an online story about four universities that reportedly rejected Hogg’s college admissions application.

“In our view, these statements focused on a high school student, cross the line of decency. As such, we have made a decision to stop advertising on that program,” a spokesperson for TripAdvisor.com said in a statement.

Home furnishing company WayFair, in a statement, said it supports open dialogue and debate on issues – with restrictions.

“The decision of an adult to personally criticize a high school student who has lost his classmates in an unspeakable tragedy is not consistent with our values. We do not plan to continue advertising on this particular program,” the ecommerce company said in a statement.

Ingraham – who courted controversy last month criticizing NBA superstar LeBron James’ comment about President Trump not understanding black people – made no comment of the Hogg controversy on her March 29 show and has apologized for her comment, tweeting:

“Any student should be proud of a 4.2 GPA —incl. @DavidHogg111. On reflection, in the spirit of Holy Week, I apologize for any upset or hurt my tweet caused him or any of the brave victims of Parkland. For the record, I believe my show was the first to feature David…”