MovieSpree TVOD Service Bows Sales on Animated Kids’ Series Including ‘Gigantosaurus’

MovieSpree, Mill Creek Entertainment’s transactional VOD service, is offering sales on several animated kids’ series to keep the little ones occupied while they stay at home.

On March 25, MovieSpree launched the complete first season of the animated kids’ series “Gigantosaurus,” on sale for $22.49 — 25% off of the regular price. In the series, young dinosaurs Rocky, Bill, Tiny and Mazu are growing up in the Cretaceous period where life is always an adventure — new volcanoes are popping up all the time, the long-necked brachiosauruses and enormous triceratops roam free, meteor showers light up the night sky, and the big, fierce Gigantosaurus reigns over it all.

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“Liberty’s Kids”

Also on sale are several complete animated series at $2.99, including “Liberty’s Kids” (including all 40 episodes of the edutainment series), “Street Sharks,” “C.O.P.S.,” “The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes in the 22nd Century,” “Archie’s Weird Mysteries” and “Horseland.”

‘Xavier Riddle and The Secret Museum: Meet Xavier’ Due on DVD and Digital March 17 From PBS

Xavier Riddle and the Secret Museum: Meet Xavier will be released on DVD and digital March 17 from PBS Distribution.

It’s the first DVD release for the new series which follows the adventures of Xavier, his sister Yadina, and their friend Brad as they solve problems that come their way with the help of a “secret museum.” The museum is a portal that sends the friends back in time to meet real-life heroes when they were kids, who help them solve their problems.

“Xavier Riddle and the Secret Museum” debuted on PBS KIDS in November 2019. The series is based on the children’s book series Ordinary People Change the World by New York Times bestselling author Brad Meltzer and illustrator Christopher Eliopoulos and is designed to teach kids about influential historical figures and living heroes and some of the key experiences that shaped their lives, while emphasizing important social emotional concepts and positive character traits such as courage, resilience, and commitment to setting and accomplishing goals.

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In the three-episode Meet Xavier, Xavier, Yadina and Brad meet Marie Curie in the episode “I Am Marie Curie.” She shows Brad that he should always follow his dreams. In the episode “I Am George Washington Carver,” Xavier learns how important plant life is and why we need to take care of the earth. And in “I Am Charles Dickens,” the writer shows Yadina that she doesn’t need new toys because her imagination can be just as fun.

 

Reports: Kids Still Covet the Boob Tube

In an age of portable media, children’s fixation with screen time has increased exponentially. Yet, new research suggests kids still gravitate to the old-fashion television — with no discernible damage to their health.

Comparing pre-mobile device usage in 1997 to when mobile devices were widely available in 2014, the study — by the Robert Stempel College of Public Health & Social Work at Florida International University — found that television consumption still significantly outpaced mobile devices such as smart phones or tablets.

“There is growing concern over the amount of time that children, particularly very young children, spend watching shows and in front of screens,” Weiwei Chen, assistant professor in the department of health policy and management, said in a statement. “Our findings were surprising as it feels like mobile devices are omnipresent, but televisions are still the most common way for young children to consume media.”

The study, which was published in JAMA Pediatrics, found that the average amount of screen time in 1997 for children up to the age of 2 was 1.3 hours, while children between the ages of 3 and 5 spent about 2.5 hours a day on screens. By 2014, children up to the age of 2 were using screens an average of 3 hours per day — more than double the amount of time. It was found that children aged 3 to 5 did not have a significant increase.

Jessica Adler, assistant professor in the department of history, in the Steven J. Green School of international and public affairs, said the study  reinforces the belief that a variety of characteristics, such as education and income levels, relate to screen use.

“Further research is needed, once data become available, to assess changes in media consumption and device use in more recent years,” Adler said.

In a separate study, chief medical officers in the United Kingdom said there wasn’t enough evidence to support screen time guidelines for children.

However, they recommended a precautionary approach — including the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health’s Screen Time Guidance — in addition to schools, government and technology companies’ actions to protect children and young people from too much screen time exposure.

“While there is a lack of evidence to suggest that screen time itself is harmful, the content and context of what children are viewing is paramount,” said RCPCH president Russell Viner.

Viner said parents should make decisions about screen time based on their child’s development and health, and whether they are getting enough exercise and sleep.

“It remains a question of balance, as it is when screen use gets in the way or restricts other activities that a child’s well-being can be negatively impacted,” he said.