Khalid Itum Departs MoviePass; CTO and Human Resources Executives Transition to Consultants

MoviePass March 13 disclosed that Khalid Itum, hired last December to oversee daily operations at the fiscally-challenged movie theater subscription service, is leaving the company.

Khalid Itum

“Itum will be leaving MoviePass to pursue his entrepreneurial and travel pursuits,” a spokesperson told Business Insider in a statement.

The departure comes as chief technology officer Joey Adarkway and Jake Peterson, head of human resources, transition from fulltime employees to consultants.

The personnel moves come the day after corporate parent Helios and Matheson Analytics disclosed, in a regulatory filing, that MoviePass lost nearly $10 million more ($146.6 million) in the most-recent fiscal filing than was originally disclosed.

Meanwhile, HMNY appears to be successfully churning out content through its MoviePass Films unit headed by co-founders Randall Emmett and George Furla. The company’s content include dramas with Bruce Willis (10 Minutes Gone) — the first of three titles with the actor, and Al Pacino and Meadow Williams in current production, Axis Sally.

In addition, Border, a Cannes-winning film MoviePass Films co-distributed with Neon Rated, was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Makeup and Hairstyling.

“As previously stated, MoviePass has moved in a new strategic direction, and will be refocusing our business model to create a more closely connected relationship between our subscription service and original content production unit, MoviePass Films,” said the spokesperson.

 

 

MoviePass Looking to Market Ticket Subscription Technology to Theaters

MoviePass, the beleaguered subscription theatrical ticket service, is looking to market its technology to exhibitors.

Dubbed a “red label” solution, the strategy is to enable theater owners a means of offering a proprietary subscription ticket service to consumers.

In addition to MoviePass, AMC Theatres and Cinemark currently offer monthly ticket subscription plans.

“Our new business strategy is stabilize, optimize and grow,” Khalid Itum, EVP of MoviePass, told Variety, which first reported the move.

MoviePass in August 2017 turned the exhibition service on its ear offering a $9.95 monthly service that enabled subscribers daily access to a theatrical screening.

While the loss-leader pricing concept resonated with millions of consumers, paying for it proved to be a debacle for MoviePass and its corporate parent Helios and Matheson Analytics (HMNY).

With the service hemorrhaging hundreds of millions of dollars, it has introduced seesaw measures to rein in costs, alienating consumers in the process.

MoviePass now charges from $9.95 to $24.95  monthly for theatrical access depending on market location. A new unlimited plan is also in the works.

HMNY’s stock has taken a beating on Wall Street, with shares in risk of being delisted for failing to meet the $1-per-share minimum. The corporate parent this week filed papers looking to spin off MoviePass to a subsidiary in hopes of resuscitating the penny stock.

HMNY subsidiary MoviePass Films got a boost this week after its film, Border, was nominated for an Academy Award in the “Best Makeup and Hairstyling” category. Announced last September, MoviePass Films partnered with Neon Rated LLC to co-release the Cannes award-winning film from writer and director Ali Abbasi.

The Swedish fantasy film is based on the short story of the same name by Ajvide Lindqvist from his anthology “Let the Old Dreams Die.” It won the Un Certain Regard award at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival and was selected as the Swedish entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 91st Academy Awards, though it was not nominated.