Tremors (Limited Edition)

4K ULTRA HD BLU-RAY REVIEW:

MVD/Arrow;
Horror;
$49.95 Blu-ray, $59.95 UHD BD;
Rated ‘PG-13.’
Stars Kevin Bacon, Fred Ward, Finn Carter, Michael Gross, Reba McEntire, Victor Wong, Bobby Jacoby, Ariana Richards, Charlotte Stewart, Tony Genaro.

The original Tremors was such an unassuming creature-feature at the time of its release in 1990 that it’s hard to believe it spawned a massive franchise of seven movies and a TV show over the course of 30 years.

Of course, while that first film was the only one released in theaters, the direct-to-video follow-ups have been hugely important in maintaining its status as an iconic cult hit while expanding on the mythology of the deadly Graboids. As a result, the first film holds up remarkably well to the passage of time, maintaining a timeless quality owing to its uncomplicated depiction of small-town American life, and subsequent films’ ability to maintain that charm despite the advent of technological progress.

This new Arrow Films boxed set is a definitive archive of the original Tremors, containing a sharp new transfer of the film and a treasure trove of behind-the-scenes material.

The film stars Kevin Bacon and Fred Ward as a pair of hard luck handyman servicing the small town of Perfection in the remote desert of Nevada. When the area is besieged by giant worm-like monsters called Graboids that tunnel though the ground to eat people and livestock, the surviving residents band together to defend their homes from the creatures.

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While the film was shot in 1989, it seems much closer to something one might find in the mid 1990s. It also feels like a throwback to 1950s monster movies, thanks to some nice visual effects work that makes use of practical methods such as miniatures and puppets, rather than the CGI that would come along later (and be used in some of the direct-to-video sequels). The performances, creature effects and offbeat tongue-in-cheek humor make the film, and the franchise, a lot of fun.

Among the more memorable characters are Burt and Heather Gummer, a couple of doomsday preppers played by Michael Gross and Reba McEntire. The role marked the acting debut of country music superstar McEntire, while Gross was just coming off playing the pacifist left-wing dad on “Family Ties,” so playing a paramilitary survivalist was an interesting change of pace for him. Given a chance to expand the role in subsequent sequels increased Burt’s popularity with audiences to the point where he eventually became the face of the franchise — including headlining the seventh movie that just came out in October. Gross is the only actor from the original to appear in all seven films and the TV show (though he wasn’t in every episode).

Also on hand is young Ariana Richards, who would turn up three years later in a similar running-from-monsters role in Jurassic Park. Richards would also return to Perfection in 2001 for the third “Tremors” movie.

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Among the tidbits gleaned from the copious retrospective bonus material, the film was developed under a variety of titles, such as Land Shark and later Beneath Perfection, the preferred title of the creators. To appeal to Japanese investors, Universal Studios changed it to the earthquake-flavored Tremors.

The movie comes with two new commentary tracks — one by director Ron Underwood and co-writers Brent Maddock and S.S. Wilson; the other by fan and Tremors expert Jonathan Melville, who also contributes an essay about the history of the film’s sequels to a nice booklet included with the set.

In addition to deleted scenes, the 1996 making-of featurette and EPK profiles from previous DVD and Blu-ray releases, there are also hours of new retrospective featurettes, starting with the half-hour “Making Perfection,” a new documentary produced by Universal. “Making Perfection” includes interviews with several of the filmmakers and cast from the original film, including Bacon, Gross and Richards, and even ropes in Jamie Kennedy, a co-star of the fifth and sixth films.

Other new featurettes include a discussion of the development of the movie with co-producer Nancy Roberts; an interview with cinematographer Alexander Gruszynski; and a discussion of the music of the film with its composers.

Most interesting is a look at the visual effects, which is accompanied by some test footage.

Also included is a montage of edits made to the film to sanitize it for broadcast TV.

The only drawback to the set is that the 4K Ultra HD box isn’t a combo pack. Both the 4K and Blu-ray sets include two discs — one with the film and most of the extras, and a second with a few more supplements. The first disc is either 4K or standard Blu-ray depending on the format indicated on the box, while the bonus disc in both versions is the same standard Blu-ray. The 4K does not include a standard Blu-ray version of the film, so collectors who want that 1080p copy for whatever reason will have to decide between buying both Arrow editions, or keeping their old Universal Blu-rays around.

Extras on that second disc include additional “Making Perfection” interviews, a gag reel, early short films from the creators of Tremors, and footage from a 2015 Q&A event with several cast members and filmmakers conducted at a 25th anniversary screening at the Arclight Hollywood.

Other goodies in the box include a two-sided 16×20-inch poster containing the film’s original poster art on one side and the DVD art on the other; a mini-poster highlighting Graboid anatomy; and lobby cards with images from the film.

 

‘Cinema Paradiso’ and ‘Tremors’ on 4K Among Arrow Titles Available on Disc From MVD

Cinema Paradiso, Tremors, Versus and the Shohei Imamura three-film collection Survivor Ballads are available this month on disc from MVD and Arrow Films.

A winner of awards across the world including the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar, five BAFTA Awards, the Grand Prize of the Jury at the Cannes Film Festival and many more, Cinema Paradiso (1988) — available on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, Blu-ray and DVD — is Giuseppe Tornatore’s loving homage to the cinema. It tells the story of Salvatore, a successful film director, returning home for the funeral of Alfredo, his old friend who was the projectionist at the local cinema throughout his childhood. Soon memories of his first love affair with the beautiful Elena and all the highs and lows that shaped his life come flooding back, as Salvatore reconnects with the community he left 30 years earlier. The original award-winning theatrical version of Tornatore’s classic is presented here for the first time on 4K Ultra-HD Blu-ray with DolbyVision. This edition also includes the expanded director’s cut on Blu-ray, which delves deeper into Salvatore’s backstory. Special features include audio commentary with Tornatore and Italian cinema expert critic Millicent Marcus; “A Dream of Sicily,” a 52-minute documentary profile of Tornatore with interviews with the director and extracts from his early home movies and interviews with director Francesco Rosi and painter Peppino Ducato, set to music by Ennio Morricone; “A Bear and a Mouse in Paradise,” a 27-minute documentary on the making of Cinema Paradiso and the characters of Toto and Alfredo, featuring interviews with the actors who play them, Philippe Noiret and Salvatore Cascio, as well as Tornatore; “The Kissing Sequence,” in which Tornatore discusses the origins of the kissing scenes with clips identifying each scene; and the original director’s cut theatrical trailer and 25th anniversary re-release trailer.

A 1950s-style humorous creature feature, Tremors (1990), available on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray and Blu-ray, is a cult classic that has spawned a successful franchise that continues to this day. In the film, good-ol’-boy handymen Val (Kevin Bacon) and Earl (Fred Ward) are sick of their dead-end jobs in one-horse desert town Perfection, Nev. (population: 14). Just as they’re about to escape Perfection forever, however, things start to get really weird: half-eaten corpses litter the road out of town; the phone lines stop working; and a plucky young scientist shows evidence of unusually strong seismic activity in the area. Something is coming for the citizens of Perfection and it’s underground. The release features a new 4K restoration from the original negative by Arrow Films, approved by director Ron Underwood and director of photography Alexander Gruszynski. Included in the release are a 60-page book featuring new writing by Kim Newman and Jonathan Melville and selected archive materials; a large fold-out double-sided poster featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Matt Frank; a small fold-out double-sided poster featuring new Graboid X-ray art by Frank; six double-sided, postcard-sized lobby card reproductions; and limited edition packaging with a reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Frank. Special features include new audio commentary by director Ron Underwood and writers/producers Brent Maddock and S.S. Wilson; new audio commentary by Jonathan Melville, author of Seeking Perfection: The Unofficial Guide to Tremors; “Making Perfection,” a new documentary by Universal Studios interviewing key cast and crew from the franchise (including Bacon, Gross, Ariana Richards and Underwood, among many others) and revisiting the original locations; “The Truth About Tremors,” a newly filmed interview with co-producer Nancy Roberts on the film’s rocky road to the screen; “Bad Vibrations,” a newly filmed interview with director of photography Alexander Gruszynski; “Aftershocks and Other Rumblings,” newly filmed on-set stories from associate producer Ellen Collett; “Digging in the Dirt,” a new featurette interviewing the crews behind the film’s extensive visual effects; “Music for Graboids,” a new featurette on the film’s music with composers Ernest Troost and Robert Folk; “Pardon My French!,” a newly assembled compilation of overdubs from the edited-for television version; and numerous archive and other extras.

Survivor Ballads is an exclusive Blu-ray box set from Arrow Academy that presents restored versions of three late career classics from legendary filmmaker Shohei Imamura, a leading figure of the Japanese New Wave era of the 1960s. Based on an ancient folktale, The Ballad of Narayama (1983) was the first of two works from the director to win the prestigious Cannes Palme d’Or. Imamura’s magnum opus depicts the members of an extended farming family eking out their existence in the mountains north of Japan against the backdrop of the changing seasons before village lore decrees they make the sacrifice of abandoning their aged mother on the top of a nearby mountain when she reaches her 70th year. Making its HD debut, Zegen (1987) takes a satirical look at Japan’s prewar colonial expansion through the unscrupulous eyes of its flesh-peddler antihero as he establishes a prostitution enterprise across Southeast Asia. Finally, the harrowing Black Rain (1989) details the precarious existence of a household of atomic bomb survivors as, five years after being caught in the blast of Hiroshima, they struggle to find a husband for their 25-year-old niece. The three works epitomize the director’s almost documentary style of filmmaking, exposing the vulgar yet vibrant and instinctive underbelly of Japanese society through a sympathetic focus on peasants, prostitutes, criminal lowlife and other marginalized figures to explore the schism between the country’s timeless premodern traditions and the modern face it projects to the world. Special features include new audio commentaries on all three films by Japanese cinema expert Jasper Sharp; new, in-depth appreciations of all three films by Japanese cinema expert Tony Rayns; an alternate color ending to Black Rain, shot by Imamura but removed from the film shortly before its release; archival interviews on Black Rain with actress Yoshiko Tanaka and assistant director Takashi Miike; multiple trailers and image galleries; original Japanese press kits for The Ballad of Narayama and Black Rain (BD-ROM content); a limited edition, 60-page booklet containing new writing by Tom Mes; and limited edition packaging featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Tony Stella.

Versus (2000), available on Blu-ray, is chock-full of fight scenes, gangster shootouts, sword-slashing violence and gory zombie horror. In the film, a mysterious face-off in a wooded clearing between two escaped convicts and a carload of sharply dressed yakuza holding a beautiful woman captive ends in hails of bullets and showers of blood. The location for this violent encounter is the mythic Forest of Resurrection, the site of the 444th portal of the 666 hidden gates that link this earthly domain to the netherworld. As one of the surviving prisoners escapes with the girl into the darkness of the forest, disgruntled gangsters soon become the least of their worries as an earlier battle between a lone warrior against hordes of zombie samurai is carried over from a millennium ago into the present day. The film launched the careers of director Ryûhei Kitamura (Godzilla Final Wars, Midnight Meat Train) and action star and fight choreographer Tak Sakaguchi (Battlefield Baseball, Yakuza Weapon). Arrow Video is presenting the title in both its original 2000 and expanded 2004 Ultimate Versus iterations, in a new, director-approved restoration. Numerous extras include a reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Chris Malbon; audio commentary by Kitamura and producer Keishiro Shin; and audio commentary by Kitamura and the cast and crew.

‘You Should Have Left,’ Three Other New Releases Debut on ‘Watched at Home’ Chart

The DVD and digital release of You Should Have Left sent the psychological thriller from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment soaring up the weekly “Watched at Home” chart to debut at No. 2.

The film, from Blumhouse Productions, stars Kevin Bacon and Amanda as a couple seeking a restful vacation in a remote home in the Welsh countryside. Their retreat soon turns into a terrifying nightmare when reality begins to unravel, dark episodes from the past resurface, and a sinister force in the house refuses to let them leave.

Another Universal-distributed film, DreamWorks Animation’s Trolls World Tour, remained in the top spot on the chart for the week ended Aug. 1. It’s the animated sequel’s fifth consecutive week at No. 1 on the “Watched at Home” chart, which tracks transactional video activity compiled from studio and retailer data through DEG: The Digital Entertainment Group.

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Scoob!, which debuted at No. 2 the previous week in the wake of its release on Blu-ray Disc, 4K Ultra HD and DVD, slipped to No. 7. Scoob! was available for streaming on the new HBO Max SVOD service prior to its release on physical media.

Paramount’s three seasons of “Yellowstone” again rounded out the top five, in the same spots as the prior week: season one at No. 3, season three at No. 4, and season two at No. 5.

Aside from You Should Have Left, three other new films, all released through digital retailers only, entered the “Watched at Home” top 20 the week ended Aug. 1. The Rental, an IFC Films drama about two couples on an unnerving weekend getaway, debuted at No. 8. Most Wanted, a Paramount Home Entertainment crime drama starring Josh Hartnett as an investigative reporter probing a heroin bust orchestrated by dirty cops to frame an innocent man, bowed at No. 10. And Warner’s Deep Blue Sea 3, a shark tale starring Tania Raymonde (“Lost,” “Goliath”) entered the “Watched at Home” chart at No. 11.

  1. Trolls World Tour (Universal/DreamWorks)
  2. You Should Have Left (Universal)
  3. Yellowstone: Season 1 (Paramount)
  4. Yellowstone: Season 3 (Paramount)
  5. Yellowstone: Season 2 (Paramount)
  6. The Outpost (Screen Media)
  7. Scoob! (Warner Bros.)
  8. The Rental (IFC Films)
  9. Sonic the Hedgehog (Paramount)
  10. Most Wanted (Paramount, 2020)
  11. Deep Blue Sea 3 (Warner)
  12. The High Note (Universal)
  13. Jumanji: The Next Level (Sony)
  14. Force of Nature (Lionsgate, 2020)
  15. Bloodshot (Sony)
  16. Harry Potter: The Complete 8-Film Collection (Warner)
  17. The Invisible Man (Universal)
  18. Fantasy Island (Sony, 2020)
  19. Bad Boys for Life (Sony)
  20. Birds of Prey (Warner)

 

Source: DEG: The Digital Entertainment Group
Includes U.S. digital sales, digital rentals, and DVD, Blu-ray Disc and 4K Ultra HD sales for the week ended Aug. 1.

Thriller ‘You Should Have Left’ Arrives on Digital and DVD July 28 From Universal

The psychological thriller You Should Have Left will be available to own on digital and DVD July 28 from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment.

From Blumhouse Productions and writer-director David Koepp (Stir of Echoes), the film stars Kevin Bacon (Patriots DayHollow Man) and Amanda Seyfried (Mamma Mia! Here We Go AgainLes Misérables) as a couple seeking a restful vacation in a remote home in the Welsh countryside. What at first seems like a perfect retreat distorts into a terrifying nightmare when reality begins to unravel, dark episodes from the past resurface, and a sinister force in the house refuses to let them leave.

The film is based on the novel from German author Daniel Kehlmann and is produced by Jason Blum (The Invisible Man, Halloween, Split, Us).

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