Hal Ashby-Helmed Vietnam War Drama ‘Coming Home’ Heads to Blu-ray Disc Jan. 16

Kino Lorber on Jan. 16 will release on Blu-ray Disc Coming Home, the Hal Ashby-directed drama about the shattering aftermath of the Vietnam War.

The 1978 film stars Jane Fonda, Jon Voight, Bruce Dern, Penelope Milford, Robert Carradine, Robert Ginty, Mary Gregory, and Kathleen Miller.

Coming Home earned eight Academy Award nominations and won three for Best Actress (Fonda), Actor (Voight) and Original Screenplay. When Marine Capt. Bob Hyde (Dern) leaves for Vietnam, his wife Sally (Fonda) volunteers at a local hospital. There, she meets Luke Martin (Voight), a former sergeant whose war injury has left him a paraplegic. Embittered with rage and filled with frustration, Luke finds new hope and confidence through his growing intimacy with Sally. The relationship transforms Sally’s feeling about life, love and the horrors of war. And when, wounded and disillusioned, Sally’s husband returns home, all three must grapple with the full impact of a brutal distant war that has changed their lives forever.

Bonus features include audio commentaries by actors Voight and Dern with cinematographer Haskel Wexler; the featurettes “Coming Back Home” and “Hal Ashby – A Man Out of Time”; and the original theatrical trailer.

‘Book Club: The Next Chapter’ Available for Regular Digital Release June 30, on Disc July 11

The comedy sequel Book Club: The Next Chapter will be available for regular digital purchase June 30 (it’s currently at a premium digital price) and on Blu-ray and DVD July 11 in a collector’s edition from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment.

Starring Oscar winners Diane Keaton (Annie Hall, Something’s Gotta Give), Jane Fonda (80 for Brady, “Grace and Frankie”) and Mary Steenburgen (Nightmare Alley, “The Last Man on Earth”), and Oscar nominee Candice Bergen (Let Them All Talk, Miss CongenialityBride Wars), the sequel follows four best friends as they take their book club to Italy for the fun girls trip they never had. When things go off the rails and secrets are revealed, their relaxing vacation turns into a once-in-a-lifetime, cross-country adventure. 

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The film also stars Oscar nominees Andy Garcia (Ocean’s ElevenThe Godfather Part III) and Giancarlo Giannini (Quantum of SolaceCasino Royale), Primetime Emmy Award winner Craig T. Nelson (“Parenthood,” “Coach”), and Primetime Emmy Award nominee Don Johnson (Knives Out, “Miami Vice”).

Bonus features include “Book Club: Back in Session,” featuring interviews with thecast and crew; “Still Stylish,” about the costumes in the film; and “The Women in Italy,” about the locations in the film.

Comedy Sequel ‘Book Club: The Next Chapter’ Available for Premium Digital Rental and Purchase

The comedy Book Club: The Next Chapter is available now for premium digital rental (PVOD) and purchase (PEST) on digital platforms from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment.

Starring Oscar winners Diane Keaton (Annie Hall, Something’s Gotta Give), Jane Fonda (80 for Brady, “Grace and Frankie”) and Mary Steenburgen (Nightmare Alley, “The Last Man on Earth”), and Oscar nominee Candice Bergen (Let Them All Talk, Miss Congeniality, Bride Wars), the sequel follows four best friends as they take their book club to Italy for the fun girls trip they never had. When things go off the rails and secrets are revealed, their relaxing vacation turns into a once-in-a-lifetime, cross-country adventure. 

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The film also stars Oscar nominees Andy Garcia (Ocean’s Eleven, The Godfather Part III) and Giancarlo Giannini (Quantum of Solace, Casino Royale), Primetime Emmy Award winner Craig T. Nelson (“Parenthood,” “Coach”), and Primetime Emmy Award nominee Don Johnson (Knives Out, “Miami Vice”).

80 for Brady

BLU-RAY REVIEW:

Paramount;
Comedy;
Box Office $39.33 million;
$25.99 DVD, $31.99 Blu-ray;
Rated ‘PG-13’ for brief strong language, some drug content and some suggestive references.
Stars Lily Tomlin, Jane Fonda, Rita Moreno, Sally Field, Tom Brady, Billy Porter, Harry Hamlin, Guy Fieri, Alex Moffat, Rob Corddry, Glynn Turman, Ron Funches, Bob Balaban, Jimmy O. Yang, Matt Lauria, Sara Gilbert, Sally Kirkland, Andy Richter.

On the roster of wackiest sports comedies in cinema history, there have been films about field-goal kicking mules, dogs playing basketball, and angels providing supernatural guidance to baseball teams. So the premise of four old ladies taking a road trip to see Tom Brady play in the Super Bowl would hardly scratch the surface.

80 for Brady chronicles a weekend in the lives of four friends — Lily Tomlin, Jane Fonda, Rita Moreno and Sally Field — as they attempt to crash Super Bowl LI in Houston. The game has a special significance to them as they are huge devotees of Tom Brady, having accidentally stumbled upon the game in 2001 in which the Patriots were playing the Jets and Brady had to come in off the bench to take over for an injured Drew Bledsoe. The moment inspired Lou (Tomlin) in her battle against cancer, so the quartet made rooting for Brady a weekly tradition.

After 16 years, however, Lou fears the cancer may have returned, and hits upon the idea of visiting the Super Bowl as one last great adventure. Lou surprises her friends with tickets to the big game she says she won in a radio contest, and the trip is on.

The concept was inspired by a real-life group of Patriots fans called the “Over 80 for Brady” club, with the idea for a film based upon them being pitched by one of their grandsons.

Sports enthusiasts in the audience might recall that Super Bowl LI, played in 2017, was the game in which the Atlanta Falcons held a commanding 28-3 lead before Brady led the Patriots to a comeback win to claim the NFL championship. That’s the backdrop for 80 for Brady, which is essentially the story of Super Bowl LI by way of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, as the ladies find themselves involved in all sorts of mischief during the festivities leading up to the big game, putting themselves in a position to alter the course of sports history.

It’s all an amusing bit of fluff that gives four iconic Hollywood actresses another chance to command the screen and have a lot of fun doing so. The project also let Tomlin and Fonda continue their collaborative streak that began when they started production on “Grace and Frankie” in 2014.

As if feeding off that vibe, there’s a music video on the Blu-ray for the song “Gonna Be You” written by Diane Warren, performed by Tomlin and Fonda’s old 9 to 5 co-star Dolly Parton alongside Belinda Carlisle, Cyndi Lauper, Gloria Estefan and Debbie Harry — a lineup of music legends to parallel the group from the film.

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The Blu-ray is loaded with a ton of behind-the-scenes material, starting with the nearly 14-minute “The Game Plan: Making 80 For Brady,” which offers a general look at the production. The nine-minute “The GOATs: Jane, Lily, Rita & Sally” focuses on the main cast, while the seven-minute “The Visiting Team: Meet the Supporting Cast” gives their co-stars a chance to discuss the fun they had making the movie. There’s also a four-minute “80 For Brady: Play-By-Play” roundtable discussion with some of the actresses, hosted by Billy Porter.

On the sports side of things, the six -minute “The Largest Comeback in Super Bowl History” looks at the real-life game at the center of the film.

Rounding out the extras are three deleted and extended scenes totaling about four minutes of material.

Comedy ‘Moving On’ Headed to Digital May 2, Disc May 16 From Lionsgate

Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin reunite once again in the comedy Moving On, which arrives for digital purchase May 2, and on VOD, Blu-ray (plus digital) and DVD May 16 from Lionsgate. 

In the revenge comedy from Academy Award-nominated writer Paul Weitz, Claire (Academy Award winner Jane Fonda) and Evelyn (Academy Award nominee Lily Tomlin) are estranged friends who reunite to get even with Howard (Malcolm McDowell), the petulant widower of their recently deceased best friend. Along the way, Claire reunites with Ralph (Richard Roundtree), her great love from her younger years, as each woman must make peace with her past and learn to treasure the value of a good friend.

Special features include a photo gallery.

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Paramount to Bow ’80 for Brady’ for Premium Digital Purchase and Rental March 7

Paramount Home Entertainment will release the comedy 80 for Brady for premium digital purchase (PEST) and rental (PVOD) March 7.

Inspired by a true story, the film follows four best friends (played by Lily Tomlin, Jane Fonda, Rita Moreno and Sally Field) living life to the fullest when they take a wild trip to the 2017 Super Bowl LI to see their hero Tom Brady play.

The film also stars Tom Brady, Billy Porter, Rob Corddry, Alex Moffat, Guy Fieri, Harry Hamlin, Bob Balaban, Glynn Turman, Sara Gilbert, Jimmy O. Yang, Ron Funches and Matt Lauria.

Special features on digital include “The Game Plan: Making 80 for Brady,” a sneak peek at the making of the film; “The GOATs: Jane, Lily, Rita & Sally,” an ode to aging, the power of female friendship, and how wisdom surpasses youth; “The Visiting Team: Meet the Supporting Cast,” featuring Sara Gilbert, Billy Porter, Jimmy O. Yang, Harry Hamlin, Guy Fieri, and Patton Oswalt for behind-the-scenes interviews; “The Largest Comeback in Super Bowl History,” in which Tom Brady and his teammates relive their epic comeback; extended and deleted scenes; “80 For Brady: Play-By-Play,” a roundtable play-by-play with host Billy Porter; and the “Gonna Be You” music video, featuring Dolly Parton, Belinda Carlisle, Cyndi Lauper, Gloria Estefan, and Debbie Harry for the song written by Diane Warren.

80 for Brady will also be available in a two-movie collection with Book Club for digital purchase at a special price starting March 7. It arrives on Blu-ray Disc and DVD May 2.

Animated ‘Luck’ Headed to Apple TV+ Aug. 5

 The animated adventure film Luck from Apple Original Films and Skydance Animation will debut globally on Apple TV+ on Aug. 5.

Luck centers on the story of Sam Greenfield, the unluckiest person in the world. When she discovers the never-before-seen Land of Luck, Sam must unite with the magical creatures there to turn her luck around. Eva Noblezada (“Hadestown,” “Miss Saigon,” “Yellow Rose”) will provide the voice for Sam. Simon Pegg (Mission: Impossible, Ice Age, Star Trek Beyond) will provide the voice for Bob, a lucky black cat from the Land of Luck, where the Captain (voiced by Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony winner Whoopi Goldberg) stands guard as the head of security. Bob becomes Sam’s partner in the quest to find a lucky penny in hopes of preserving his lucky life.

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Also joining is Flula Borg (Suicide Squad 2, Pitch Perfect, Trolls World Tour), who will provide the voice for Jeff the Unicorn, a larger-than-life facilities engineer who maintains the magical machine that distributes good and bad luck to the human world and who dreams of one day being reunited with his one true love, the CEO of Good Luck, the Dragon, voiced by two-time Academy Award winner Jane Fonda. Lil Rel Howery (Free Guy, Vacation Friends, Judas and the Black Messiah) will provide the voice for Marv, the owner of the Flowers & More store where Sam gets her first job.

 John Lasseter, David Ellison, Dana Goldberg and David Eisenmann are producing for Skydance Animation.

Klute

BLU-RAY REVIEW:

Criterion;
Drama;
$29.95 DVD, $39.95 Blu-ray;
Rated ‘R.’
Stars Jane Fonda, Donald Sutherland, Roy Scheider, Charles Cioffi.

Released in relatively stealth fashion during a unforgettable movie summer in 1971 that put and puts the last 10 (at least) to shame, Alan J. Pakula’s Klute is a psychological drama wrapped in thriller/mystery trappings rather than a thriller/mystery per se — which possibly resulted in its being underrated at the time. Don’t get me wrong: Almost everyone save Jane Fonda bashers thought it some degree of good or better. But speaking for myself and not in isolation, it paled somewhat next to the concurrently released McCabe and Mrs. Miller, Carnal Knowledge and Walkabout (and let’s not forget that Two-Lane Blacktop is pretty close to a deity to the carburetor set and/or blackbelt cultists).

Blasting out of the gate with a new 4K remastering of Gordon Willis’s trademark anti-solar cinematography, Criterion’s new Klute release is one of the best-produced Blu-rays I’ve ever seen (Susan Arosteguy). And its combined package of nary-a-dud bonus extras now pounds it into me how unusual this film was — though credit as well half-a-century of the Women’s Movement, which was more or less in its torch-lighting phase around the time Klute came out, especially in and around where I had the good historical fortune to be: NYU. Of course, it always had what seems even more impressive today: an Oscar-winning Fonda performance that is among the significant ones of the modern screen era.

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Criterion always seems to know what kind of supplemental material we want to see and, equally important, how or where to get them — so we get two remarkable Fonda interviews, conducted decades apart, that artfully operate in tandem here. The first was when she was young, pregnant and amid a personal political controversy (“Hanoi Jane”) that has abated only a sliver to this day. The other sit-down is a recent one, conducted by Illeana Douglas specifically for this release, in which Fonda (who is really smart regardless of where you stand on her politics, which were mostly way ahead of their time) talks about what she went through to research the role. And how she wanted to bolt the project on the eve of shooting because weeks spent with real-deal parties had convinced her that no one would accept her as a call girl.

This is what her “Brie” character is and a New York one as well, though she’s moved from more fashionable clientele and digs in a better part of town to something a few rungs down — she’s by no means a street person, or barely better, which is what some of her old colleagues have become. This is the New York before Giuliani turned it into Disney World (no value judgments here; I like Disney World) when “litter” was a cottage industry and even on the Upper West Side where I lived, I could see a guy urinating in the street late at night as I came home to my apartment after a double feature at the New Yorker or Thalia rep movie houses, which all the NYU film students regarded as second homes. Into this world comes the title small-town cop (Donald Sutherland) hired to investigate the year-long disappearance of a friend and possible onetime Brie client. Hers is not a profession, though, where one remembers customer physical descriptions, even of the ones who beat her up.

There’s some evidence that the missing man is one who did just that, yet this kind of violence is or was against his character, depending on whether he’s now still alive. Beyond this, someone has been recently barraging Fonda with frightening phone calls (no caller I.D. in this era, folks), the kind where the caller breathes into the receiver like an asthma victim. Thus, Sutherland/Klute — whose backstory isn’t defined, which in this rare case, may be to the dramatic good — becomes both a sleuth and a bodyguard as the two odd acquaintances retrace her old haunts in an attempt to follow up on scanty hints. One of these involves a former pimp (compared to many, “polished”) played by Roy Scheider, about four months before he broke through with an eventually Oscar-nominated performance in The French Connection.

A major player in the movie is one john’s sinister-sounding collection of portable tape recordings of Brie/Fonda on the job, a techno side issue that became dramatically cutting-edge for its day (three years, even, before Coppola’s The Conversation). This eerie invasion of privacy subtext — and the participation of cinematographer of Willis on all three films — made Klute the first of Pakula’s oft-termed paranoia trilogy, preceding The Parallax View and All the President’s Men. (Parallax is nowhere to be found on Blu-ray because its rights controller is hapless Paramount, who’d prefer to bring out Grease XLVII if it could.) This was only Pakula’s second feature after a fairly distinguished producing career, and though Willis had already shot at least two worthy-plus commercial flops since his debut the year before, Klute was his first wave-maker. Visually and audibly (the picture has great mono sound and Michael Small scoring), the print caliber here is comparable to what might have been shown at the first critics’ screening in the Warner screening room, 1971.

What makes the movie (we know the mystery with an hour to go) is the manner in which it takes dramatically risky time to examine Brie’s very confused psyche. It’s divulged not just by her actions but by monologues to her psychiatrist — something we didn’t see much in major studio cop movies of the day (see Clint Eastwood’s thematic fourth cousin Coogan’s Bluff as a reference point). This is a person who’s totally confident in her trade where she controls the situation but an emotional shambles outside the bedroom — especially in actress/modeling auditions that end in rejection, even though from the evidence we see, she ought to be garnering more respect.

This is a woman who likes to needle and even ridicule cop Klute, who responds negatively just once. But he gets under her skin, and she sometimes feels an extremely cautious emotional attachment. In off hours, she ditches the party scene and curls up in bed with a hardback book — not the best choice, but this a crowd where you don’t see much reading oaf any kind; she’s stylish about her clothes but can’t keep the rubble off the floor of her apartment. Ultimately, all this is much closer to what the movie is really about, which is a major reason it has aged so well.

Michael Chapman was the camera operator here (I didn’t know that), and he supervised the transfer. Vanity Fair’s Amy Fine Collins gives the full rundown on the film’s fashions and Brie’s character-enhancing accoutrements, and delivers a massive amount of revelatory info seemingly off the top of her head. Pakula gets his day via a documentary that includes Annette Insdorf and Steven Soderbergh just for starters — and there’s a half-hour of the director on a Dick Cavett show right after his reunion with Fonda on Comes a Horseman (or “How To Look Fab Out on the Trail in Jeans and No Makeup”). Mark Harris wrote the essay (you don’t get any classier than that), and even the thrown-in promotional featurette that Warner did at the time is pretty good. (Where did these play? They were too long for a TV spot, and I never saw one in a theater — only several in 16mm years after the fact.)

Pakula had a much more scintillating visual style than his ex-partner Mulligan did, though I suppose that having Willis as cinematographer (he shot five of the 16 Pakula features) could have turned Lesley Selander into an auteur. Before his wretchedly flukish 1998 death on the Long Island Expressway, Pakula definitely had his share of bombs — several of which I’d like to see again for reevaluation. But he had a highly praised track record with actresses (Fonda, Meryl Streep, Maggie Smith, Liza Minnelli), which is noted on one or more of the bonus extras. Of course, with All the President’s Men (by far my favorite movie of his career), he didn’t do too shabbily with male actors, either.

Mike’s Picks: ‘Klute’ and ‘The Leopard Man’

Criterion July 2019 Slate Includes ‘1984,’ ‘Do the Right Thing’

Titles coming to the Criterion Collection in July 2019 will include Michael Radford’s 1984, Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing, the Jane Fonda starrer Klute, Agnieszka Holland’s Europa Europa, the 1938 comedy The Baker’s Wife and a Blu-ray edition of Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s BRD Trilogy.

July 9 (order date June 11) sees the Blu-ray release of the BRD Trilogy, a trio of films focused on the perspectives of three women in West Germany following World War II. The trilogy includes 1979’s The Marriage of Maria Braun, 1981’s Lola and 1982’s Veronika Voss. The films are in German with English subtitles

The set includes new 4K digital restorations of The Marriage of Maria Braun and Lola, with uncompressed monaural soundtracks; a high-definition digital restoration of Veronika Voss, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack; audio commentaries from 2003 featuring filmmaker Wim Wenders and cinematographer Michael Ballhaus (The Marriage of Maria Braun), film critic and author Tony Rayns (Veronika Voss), and film scholar Christian Braad Thomsen (Lola); interviews with actors Hanna Schygulla, Rosel Zech,and Barbara Sukowa; interviews with cinematographer Xaver Schwarzenberger, screenwriter Peter Märthesheimer and film scholar Eric Rentschler; Life Stories: A Conversation with R. W. Fassbinder, an interview filmed for German television in 1978; I Don’t Just Want You to Love Me, a feature-length 1992 documentary on Fassbinder’s life and career; Dance With Death, a program from 2000 about Ufa studios star Sybille Schmitz, Fassbinder’s inspiration for the character Veronika Voss; a conversation between author and curator Laurence Kardish and film editor Juliane Lorenz; trailers; plus an essay by film critic Kent Jones and production histories by author Michael Töteberg.

Also due July 9 on DVD and Blu-ray is 1990’s Europa Europa, the story of a 16-year-old German Jew separated from his family during World War II. The release includes a new 2K digital restoration supervised by director Agnieszka Holland, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras include an audio commentary from 2008 featuring Holland; new interviews with Holland and actor Marco Hofschneider; a new video essay by film scholar Annette Insdorf; a new English subtitle translation; and an essay by critic Amy Taubin.

Due July 16 (order date June 18) on DVD and Blu-ray is 1971’s Klute, starring Jane Fonda as a call-girl and aspiring actress who becomes the focal point of a missing-person investigation when detective John Klute (Donald Sutherland) turns up at her door. The release includes a new, restored 4K digital transfer, supervised by camera operator Michael Chapman, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras include a new conversation between actors Jane Fonda and Illeana Douglas; a new documentary about Klute and director Alan J. Pakula by filmmaker Matthew Miele, featuring scholars, filmmakers, and Pakula’s family and friends; “The Look of Klute,” a new interview with writer Amy Fine Collins; archival interviews with Pakula and Fonda; “Klute in New York,” a short documentary made during the shooting of the film; plus an essay by critic Mark Harris and excerpts from a 1972 interview with Pakula.

Also arriving DVD and Blu-ray July 16 is The Baker’s Wife, a comedy from playwright turned cinema auteur Marcel Pagnol, who draws a vivid portrait of a close-knit village where the marital woes of a sweetly deluded baker (Raimu) snowball into a scandal that engulfs the entire town. The release includes a new 4K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras include selected-scene audio commentary featuring Pagnol scholar Brett Bowles; an introduction by Pagnol from 1967; an excerpt from a 1966 interview with Pagnol for the French television series “Cinéastes de notre temps”; a short French news program from 1967 revisiting the village of Le Castellet, where the film was shot; a new English subtitle translation; plus an essay by film scholar Ginette Vincendeau.

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Arriving July 23 (order date June 25) on Blu-ray and DVD is 1984, an adaptation of the George Orwell novel starring John Hurt and Suzanna Hamilton. The release includes a new 4K digital restoration supervised by cinematographer Roger Deakins, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras include new interviews with director Michael Radford and Deakins; a new interview with David Ryan, author of George Orwell on Screen; behind-the-scenes footage; the film’s trailer; and an essay by writer and performer A. L. Kennedy.

Also arriving July 23 on Blu-ray and DVD is 1989’s Do the Right Thing. The release includes a new 4K digital restoration approved by cinematographer Ernest Dickerson, with 5.1 surround DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras include audio commentary from 1995 featuring director Spike Lee, Dickerson, production designer Wynn Thomas, and actor Joie Lee; introductions by Spike Lee; “Making Do the Right Thing,” a documentary from 1988 by St. Clair Bourne; new interviews with costume designer Ruth E. Carter, camera assistant Darnell Martin, New York City Council Member Robert Cornegy Jr., and writer Nelson George; an interview with editor Barry Alexander Brown from 2000; programs from 2000 and 2009 featuring Lee and members of the cast and crew; a music video for Public Enemy’s “Fight the Power,” directed by Spike Lee, with remarks from rapper Chuck D; behind-the-scenes footage; the Cannes Film Festival press conference from 1989; deleted and extended scenes; original storyboards, trailer, and TV spots; Plus an essay by critic Vinson Cunningham, and (on the Blu-ray) extensive excerpts from the journal Lee kept during the preparation for and production of the film.

Season Two of ‘2 Dope Queens,’ ‘Jane Fonda in Five Acts,’ ‘O.G.’ Among Titles Coming in March From HBO Home Entertainment

Season two of “2 Dope Queens,” Jane Fonda in Five Acts and O.G. are among the titles coming in March from HBO Home Entertainment.

Available for digital download March 11 is Swiped: Hooking Up in the Digital Age, which looks at online dating, offering revelations about the billion-dollar industry. The film features interviews with, among others, Jonathan Badeen, co-founder and CSO of Tinder; Whitney Wolfe Herd, founder and CEO of Hinge; and Mandy Ginsberg, CEO of Match Group, which owns Tinder, OkCupid and other dating sites.

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Available March 25 for digital download is O.G. Filmed in Indiana’s Pendleton Correctional Facility, an active maximum-security prison, O.G. follows Louis (Jeffrey Wright), once the head of a prominent prison gang, in the final weeks of his 24-year sentence. His impending release is upended when he takes new arrival Beecher (Theothus Carter), who is being courted by gang leadership, under his wing. Coming to grips with the indelibility of his crime and the challenge of reentering society, Louis finds his freedom hanging in the balance as he struggles to save Beecher.

Season two of “2 Dope Queens” will also be available for digital download March 25. The two return in four specials with some of their favorite stand-up comedians, including Rory Scovel, Solomon Georgio, Bowen Yang, Jamie Lee and Pat Brown, along with celebrity guests, to talk music, nostalgia and fashion.

Available for digital download March 25 and on DVD March 26 is Jane Fonda in Five Acts, about the Oscar-winning actress who has lived a life marked by controversy, tragedy and transformation in the public eye. Fonda has been vilified as Hanoi Jane, lusted after as Barbarella and heralded as beacon of the women’s movement.

Finally, due on DVD March 26 is Camping, starring Jennifer Garner and David Tennant as Kathryn and Walt, a not-so-happily married couple. A meticulously planned outdoor trip to celebrate Walt’s 45th birthday is derailed by uninvited guests and forces of nature, turning the weekend in a test of marriage and friendships.