Documentary ‘Pelosi in the House’ Due on HBO Max Dec. 13

The HBO Original documentary film Pelosi in the House debuts Dec. 13 on HBO  (9-10:50 p.m. EST/PST) and on HBO Max.
 
In her 14th documentary film for HBO, documentarian Alexandra Pelosi (HBO’s Emmy-winning Journeys with George, Homeless: The Motel Kids of Orange County, Diary of a Political Tourist, The Words That Built America) offers a candid, behind-the-scenes chronicle of the life of her mother and Speaker of the United States House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi through her career milestones leading up to the inauguration of President Joseph Biden in January 2021. Filmed in a cinéma vérité style over the course of three decades, Pelosi in the House provides a unique, longitudinal window into the life of a longstanding Democratic politician and history in the making. 

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The film goes behind the headlines as it tracks Pelosi’s life in public office from her election to Congress in 1987 and becoming the first female Speaker of the House in 2007 through the 2020 election and President Biden’s inauguration. Following Pelosi at both work and home in real time during consequential political moments in the country’s recent history, the film offers a unique look at American politics through her efforts on the Affordable Care Act, the COVID-19 relief package, two impeachments as well as a record of the events of Jan. 6, 2021, following Pelosi and other lawmakers at a secure location as the crisis unfolded.

House Approves Restoring Net Neutrality

As expected, the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives April 10 voted to restore net neutrality guidelines established by the Federal Communications Commission in 2015 and repealed in 2017 under the direction of President Trump’s appointed FCC chairman Ajit Pai.

The 232-190 vote (along party lines) on the Save the Internet Act would – if approved by the Senate and signed by Trump – restore guidelines prohibiting Internet service providers such as AT&T, Comcast and Verizon from throttling consumer access to online video services and enforce regulation characterizing the Internet as a utility similar to electricity and the telephone.

“With the Save the Internet Act, Democrats are honoring the will of the people,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) said in a statement last month.

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Despite bipartisan support in the Senate, which passed (52-47) a Congressional Review Act in 2017 to overturn the FCC’s decision, approval of the House measure by the GOP-controlled Senate now seems slim.

Due to the rules of governance, passage of the CRA required a simple majority of votes. Passage of the Save the Internet Act requires 60 Senate votes (a supermajority), which the Democrats don’t have.

Indeed, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told the media the House measure would be “dead on arrival” once it is sent over.

And the White House April 8 issued a statement saying that if the bill was presented to Trump, he would be advised to veto it.

House Democrats Seek to Reinstate ‘Net Neutrality’ Legislation

House Democrats in Congress reportedly plan to unveil legislation aimed at restoring net neutrality guidelines mandating Internet service providers (ISPs) treat all traffic on the Web equally.

The legislation, which would ban ISPs such as Comcast, AT&T and Verizon from blocking/slowing Web traffic or offering faster lanes for a fee, would be released Wednesday by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, as reported by Reuters.

Internet giants such as Facebook, Amazon, Google and Netflix endorse net neutrality guidelines.

The Federal Communications Commission in 2017 voted 3-2 along party lines to repeal net neutrality guidelines it established in 2015 in a similar vote under the Obama Administration. Those guidelines classified the Internet as a utility under Title II of the Communications Act of 1934.

The repeal enabled ISPs to enforce how its subscribers access the Internet.

Pelosi seeks to work with Senate Democrats getting “Save the Internet” legislation passed that would then require President Trump’s signature — a probable long shot considering Trump’s pick to head the FCC, Ajit Pai, orchestrated the net neutrality repeal.

The U.S. Supreme Court last year refused to hear the appeal of the decision of the D.C. Circuit Court that twice upheld the 2015 Open Internet Rule.

Regardless, with 22 state attorneys general endorsing net neutrality, and the U.S. Senate — which is controlled by Republicans — voting in 2018 to restore guidelines, the House feels it has the political momentum.