Packaged Media Keeps ‘Wonder Woman 1984’ Atop Weekly U.K. Home Entertainment Chart

Warner Home Video’s Wonder Woman 1984 continues to resonate with consumers in the U.K. thanks to packaged media. The DC superhero marked a fourth week at No. 1 on the Official Film Chart through April 7. The title was assisted with 84% of its sales made up of DVD, Blu-ray Disc and 4K UHD Blu-ray copies, despite strong competition from the chart’s highest new entry: Disney Pixar’s Soul, which finished No. 2.

Spurred by the theatrical success of Godzilla vs. Kong, Warner’s Godzilla: King of the Monsters climbed seven spots to No. 3; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment’s Spider-Man: Far From Home remained at No. 4; while Warner’s Scoob! shot up 18 spots to No. 5. Universal Pictures Home Entertainment’s Trolls World Tour finished No. 6, while a double feature of Wonder Woman/Wonder Woman 1984 finished at No. 7.

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Moving up 13 spots to No. 8 was Warner’s Roald Dahl’s The Witches, which finished just ahead of Mel Gibson’s The Passion Of The Christ (Icon Home Entertainment) at No. 9 following the Easter weekend — the first time the movie has earned a spot in the Official Film Chart. Finally, Harry Potter: The Complete Collection (Warner) jumped to No. 10, marking the first time the full collection of eight movies in the franchise entered the Top 10.

Rank Previous Week Movie Peak
Position
Week on Chart
1 1
Wonder Woman 1984 (Warner)
1 4
2 New
Soul (Disney/Pixar)
2 1
3 10 
Godzilla: King of the Monsters (Warner)
2 22
4 4
Spider-Man: Far From Home (Sony Pictures)
1 72
5 23 
Scoob! (Warner)
1 24
6
Trolls World Tour (Universal)
1 37
7
Wonder Woman/Wonder Woman 1984 (Warner)
2 2
8 21 
Roald Dahl’s The Witches (Warner)
2 15
9 New
The Passion of the Christ (Icon)
9 1
10 13 
Harry Potter: The Complete Collection (Warner)
9 17

 

MPA: Domestic Home Entertainment Revenue Spiked 21% in 2020; SVOD Subscriptions Topped 1.1 Billion Globally

Home entertainment saw a resurgence during the pandemic in 2020 as an increasing number of moviegoers were housebound due to government-mandated COVID-19 orders, according to new industry data from the Motion Picture Association.

The trade group said content released on disc and through digital channels in the United States generated $30 billion in consumer spending, up from $24.8 billion in 2019. The uptick was driven by digital transactions, which increased 33% to $26.5 billion from $20 billion. Packaged-media sales declined 26% to $3.5 billion from $4.7 billion.

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For the first time ever, subscriptions to online video services in 2020 surpassed one billion, reaching 1.1 billion globally, a 26% year-over-year growth. In its totality, the global home/mobile entertainment market reached $68.8 billion in global revenue, marking a 23% increase over 2019.

The MPA defines home/mobile entertainment as transactional video-on-demand, both electronic sellthrough (EST) and rental; physical (DVD and Blu-ray Disc); and subscription streaming. Premium video-on-demand (PVOD) figures are not included. The MPA also said it is using data from DEG: The Digital Entertainment Group for its home entertainment tallies.

Other report findings contend that during the pandemic period of 2020, 55% of U.S. adults reported that their viewing of movies or shows/series through an online subscription service increased, while 46% reported that their viewing via pay-TV increased. More than 85% of children and more than 55% of adults watch movies or shows/series on mobile devices.

Notably, daily viewers of movies or shows/series on mobile devices skewed more heavily towards the 18-24 and 25-39 year-old age groups, as well as the Hispanic/Latino and African-American/Black ethnicity groups.

“Despite the challenges to the global economy brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, the film television, and streaming industry has once again risen to the occasion,” Charles Rivkin, chairman and CEO of the Motion Picture Association, said in a statement. “Streaming experienced another huge boom, with new entrants into the market and more than one billion subscriptions worldwide for the first time ever. We kept audiences connected and entertained wherever they were and whenever they desired. Theatrical and home entertainment remain two essential parts of this dynamic and iconic industry, and I am confident that movie theaters will experience a great comeback in the months ahead.”

 

Let’s Give Home Entertainment Teams the Respect They Deserve

One of the more disturbing trends in Hollywood is that while home entertainment teams played a key role in keeping the studios afloat during the height of the pandemic, they are now the target of consolidations and restructurings as studios seek to balance the books at a time when the theatrical business is just beginning to come back.

What does it mean when we hear that studios are “merging” their home entertainment and theatrical teams? Invariably, it’s the home entertainment staffers who are shown the door.

Don’t get me wrong — I get that consolidations and restructurings are good business in these challenging times. Hollywood took a huge hit last year when movie theaters were shut down, virtually overnight, and while PVOD has certainly proven itself a lifesaver, the revenue from movies premiering at home are hardly enough to make up for the millions of dollars in lost theatrical revenue. We also have talented theatrical marketers who all of a sudden found themselves with little to do.

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But can’t there be some sort of balance? Why is it that home entertainment teams are taking the biggest, and sometimes the only, hit?

I think part of it is that traditionally, theatrical has been seen as the ‘A’ team. But as loathe as I am to resort to tired clichés, that’s akin to comparing apples with oranges. Home entertainment is a completely different ballgame. It’s not a bunch of minor leaguers, hoping to break into the majors. It’s more like the difference between Broadway and Hollywood, between stage and screen — two very different business models, two very different skill sets.

And I should point out that some of the business world’s top executives have come from the home video sector. Bob Chapek, who ran home video for the Walt Disney Co., is now CEO. Ted Sarandos, co-CEO of Netflix, used to work at a video chain, Video City. And let’s not forget Mitch Lowe, a co-founder of Netflix and Redbox, who for years ran Video Droid, a video rental store in California’s Bay Area, or Bill Mechanic, another Disney home video vet who later was tapped to lead the 20th Century Fox movie studio.

But then again, home entertainment has never gotten the respect it deserves. Forty years ago, when the business was birthed, studios were hoping to sell their movies to consumers. But when enterprising retailers bought movies on videocassette and began renting them, instead, Hollywood had a cow. Studios began suing retailers, their best customers, and it was only when the high court invoked the First Sale Doctrine, effectively allowing rentals, that grudging acceptance set in.

Studios began hiring dedicated “home video” executives, mostly from the consumer packaged-goods side of the business. One prominent studio home video president had been a refrigerator salesman. As the business grew, the home video business generated more and more money for the studios — as well as incredible ingenuity, such as Disney’s moratorium strategy and the Warner-led push toward revenue-sharing. And yet the segment’s leaders were still looked upon as second-class citizens several rungs down the ladder from the vaunted theatrical executives who ran the studios.

DVD brought a new level of respect to home entertainment. The new format, which shifted consumer habits from renting movies to buying them, brought in so much cash that home entertainment executives were even given a seat at the greenlighting table, particularly after home video revenues in 2001 for the first time ever exceeded theatrical revenues.

But when disc sales leveled off in the middle 2000s and attempts to launch a next-generation successor to DVD were bungled by a format war, home entertainment executives slowly began to be pushed out of the boardroom and into the backroom.

In the meantime, the caliber of home entertainment executives had improved significantly. When disc sales began to decline, home entertainment marketers refused to accept defeat. They jumped on the nascent electronic sellthrough model and came up with all sorts of clever tactics, including early windows, to grow the business. They adopted all the latest technologies, from data analytics to VR and AR, to promote new home entertainment releases. And when streaming began to take off — in part due to an early misstep in which studios sold or licensed their catalogs to Netflix — executives on the transactional side of the home entertainment business rallied. They did what they could to capitalize on their strengths, from forging new distribution deals — such as the Warner-Universal joint venture for physical product, and Lionsgate’s new deal with Sony Pictures — to issuing popular streaming series on disc, riding SVOD awareness much like theatrical awareness.

When the pandemic hit and the theatrical business effectively ended, home entertainment teams swooped in to save the day. They began mining catalogs for anniversary and seasonal reissues. They stepped up 4K Ultra HD release schedules. They were PVOD first responders, pivoting on short notice and essentially launching a brand-new business until their theatrical counterparts could take over. And they perfected the art of out-of-the-box thinking, taking creativity and ingenuity to new heights. Universal Pictures Home Entertainment launched a Twitter catalog watch-party series, which spotlighted several library classics and anniversary releases. Sony Pictures Home Entertainment also held social media watch-alongs, hosted by film talent and encouraging viewers to post reactions in real time on their social media accounts. Warner Bros. Home Entertainment held a virtual fan event celebrating all the superheroes and supervillains in the DC Multiverse and featuring panels with talent and filmmakers, displays of cosplay and fan art, and more. Lionsgate struck a series of promotional partnerships with digital retailers, including a “Best of Lionsgate” catalog promotion with Microsoft Movies & TV that led to a triple-digit lift in sales. And Paramount Home Entertainment marketers worked in tandem with digital retailers such as FandangoNow and Vudu to create curated promotions marketed primarily through Instagram and other social media channels. Home entertainment teams also worked tirelessly to create theatrical-style campaigns for PVOD releases such as Love and Monsters and Spell, including virtual junkets, New York Comic-Con panels and more.

As Paramount Pictures chairman and CEO Jim Gianopulos himself said in a Feb. 26 memo announcing big cuts to the studio’s home entertainment marketing team, “Many of the employees impacted by this restructuring have been part of the home entertainment division for many years. Throughout those years, they have shown enormous resilience and adaptability as the marketplace shifted from physical to digital formats.  Particularly, as we’ve faced the unique challenges of the last 12 months, the home entertainment teams have been absolutely instrumental in the continued success of the company, demonstrating incredible dedication, commitment and agility in the face of enormous and unforeseen hurdles …”

“Absolutely instrumental,” and, yet, ultimately expendable. I’m certainly not trying to tell the studios chiefs how to run their businesses. But somehow, this just doesn’t make any sense.

Lionsgate Home Entertainment Revenue Up Through Nine Months of Fiscal Year

Lionsgate home entertainment continues to see a digital lifeline as the pandemic undermines major new movie releases due to theatrical closures and limited seating.

The studio Feb. 4 reported third-quarter (ended Dec. 31, 2020) motion picture revenue of $250 million, down almost 48% from revenue of $474 million during the previous-year period. Segment operating income, which includes home entertainment, inched up 2% to $50 million from $49 million last year — despite higher theatrical and ancillary revenue in the prior-year quarter.

Like other studios/distributors, Lionsgate attributed the motion picture decline to the pandemic that has seen 65% of major market theatrical screens shuttered and major releases backlogged, curtailing packaged-media and digital releases.

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“Our success in generating strong returns from early PVOD, multiplatform, and hybrid models for the films FataleAntebellumRunI Can Only Imagine and The Secret speaks to our ability to monetize current films, while at the same time working with our theatrical exhibition partners to plan for the future,” CEO Jon Feltheimer said on the fiscal call.

The studio said five feature films have returned to production, three new film productions have started, and in the coming months Lionsgate will begin shooting the Wonder sequel White Bird from director Marc Forster; Shotgun Wedding, starring Jennifer Lopez and Josh Duhamel; Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret from producer James L. Brooks; Borderlands, teaming Kevin Hart and Cate Blanchett; and John Wick 4, starring Keanu Reeves for 2022 release.

Total home entertainment movie revenue in the quarter fell 16.5% to $159.5 million, from $190.9 million during the previous-year period. DVD/Blu-ray Disc sales tallied $36.2 million, down almost 52% from $75.4 million in the previous-year period. Digital revenue increased 6.5% to $123.1 million from $115.5 million last year.

Through nine months of the fiscal year, home entertainment movie revenue is down 6.4% to $476.8 million from $509.1 million last year.

Top-selling packaged-media releases in 2020 included Midway and Knives Out.

Television production in Q3 saw operating income swing to black with $30 million on revenue of $228 million. That compared with an operating loss of $6 million and revenue of $189 million the previous year.

Television home entertainment content sales skyrocketed to $61.1 million, from $10.6 million the year before. Disc sales topped $3.1 million, up from $600,000. Digital revenue reached $58 million, up exponentially from $10 million in the previous-year period. Through nine months, home entertainment sales of TV content is up 150% to $124.7 million from $49.8 million a year earlier.

In spite of the challenges, Lionsgate is currently shooting 19 scripted television series and, another 20 unscripted shows around the world.

Through nine months of the fiscal year, total home entertainment revenue topped $601.5 million, up about 2% from revenue of $589 million during the previous-year period.

Meanwhile, Lionsgate’s move into over-the-top video distribution continues to grow. The Santa Monica, Calif.-based studio saw global subscribers, including StarzPlay Arabia, a non-consolidated equity method investee, increased to 28 million, with global OTT subscribers increasing 900,000 to 14.6 million, 52% of the total. StarzPlay International OTT subscribers grew 26% in the quarter and domestic OTT subscribers posted gains of 300,000 subs.

Starz SVOD subs in the U.S. increased to 9.5 million, up 31% from 5.6 million during the previous-year period. International subs increased to 2.4 million from 700,000. Spanish-language based SVOD Pantaya ended the period with 900,000 subs, up 50% from 600,000 subs a year ago.

“From the Starz acquisition four years ago, through the international rollout that began in 2018, we’ve been converting and scaling Starz into a modern, data-driven global subscription leader that has become the first ‘traditional’ service to have more over-the-top than linear subscribers, a critical digital inflection point,” Feltheimer said. ” By the end of next quarter, we expect streaming revenue to surpass traditional for the first time as well.”

 

Home Entertainment Spending in 2020 Up 21% to Record $30 Billion, DEG Says

Consumer spending on home entertainment in 2020 shot up more than 21% from the prior year to a record $30 billion, spurred by movie theater closures and stay-at-home orders brought on by the coronavirus pandemic, according to estimates released Jan. 27 by DEG: The Digital Entertainment Group.

The trade group noted that digital spending accounted for the majority of the gains, led by subscription streaming, which saw spending climb 37.2% to an estimated $21.2 billion.

Transactional video spending also posted significant increases, with digital rentals up 18.3% in 2020 over 2019 and digital sales, or electronic sellthrough (EST), up 16%. According to DEG estimates,  consumers spent more than $2.3 billion renting movies and other filmed content through digital retailers (both cable and Internet) in 2020, compared with just under $2 billion in 2019, and nearly $3 billion on purchases, up from $2.6 billion the prior year.

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Consumers spent an estimated $2.5 billion on buying Blu-ray Discs, DVDs and 4K Ultra HD Blu-rays, down 25.6% from $3.3 billion the prior year. Disc sales had been declining for years but in 2020 sales were further diluted by retail store closures in the months following the World Health Organization’s March 11 declaration of a global pandemic.

In the fourth quarter, the DEG reported, total consumer spending on home entertainment rose nearly 16% from 2019 to an estimated $7.8 billion. Again, streaming led the way, with spending up 33% to an estimated $5.6 billion, or 72% of the total.

The DEG noted that premium video-on-demand (PVOD) figures are not included in the yearly or quarterly consumer spending totals. However, the trade group stated in a press release that “early insights suggest that interest is high, and results are strong. Universal has indicated that with 18 films released on PVOD across the past 10 months, with the addition of PVOD revenues, the company generated over four times what it would have expected to earn in the traditional digital home entertainment window alone. In total, the combined in-home consumer spend on these new Universal releases on a transactional basis represented over $500 million.”

Michael Bonner, the newly appointed president of Universal Pictures Home Entertainment, said in a statement, “Since the launch of PVOD, we’ve learned a tremendous amount, much of which has validated our belief that PVOD is poised to complement the theatrical business in a way that can meaningfully benefit the ecosystem across consumers, distributors and studios.”

The DEG also released the top 20 films for the year on its “Watched at Home” chart, which combines sales of physical media with digital rentals and sales.

  1. Frozen II (Disney)
  2. Jumanji: The Next Level (Sony Pictures)
  3. Star Wars: Episode IX — The Rise of Skywalker (Disney)
  4. Joker (Warner)
  5. Sonic the Hedgehog (Paramount)
  6. Bad Boys for Life (Sony)
  7. 1917 (Universal)
  8. Scoob! (Warner)
  9. Ford v Ferrari (20th Century)
  10. Knives Out (Lionsgate)
  11. Trolls World Tour (DreamWorks/Universal )
  12. Yellowstone: Season 1 (Paramount)
  13. Onward (Disney)
  14. Birds of Prey and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn (Warner)
  15. Yellowstone: Season 2 (Paramount)
  16. Yellowstone: Season 3 (Paramount)
  17. Harry Potter Complete 8-Film Collection (Warner)
  18. Maleficent: Mistress of Evil (Disney)
  19. Bloodshot (Sony)
  20. Midway (Lionsgate)

Warner’s ‘Tenet’ Atop first Official U.K. Film Chart of 2021

Warner Home Video’s Tenet held on to the No. 1 spot on home entertainment’s first Official Film Chart of 2021 in the U.K. The time-bending epic starring David Washington had more than double the unit sales (physical and digital) of its closest competition, Disney/Marvel’s The New Mutants at No. 2.

The New Mutants entered the chart as the highest new entry of the week on digital downloads only. A dark spin-off of the X-Men series, the superhero horror movie stars Maisie Williams and Anna Taylor-Joy.

Roald Dahl’s The Witches (Warner) dropped to No. 3, as festive classic Love Actually (Universal) held on for another week at No. 4. Sony Pictures Home Entertainment’s Spider-Man: Far From Home re-entered the chart for the first time since October at No. 5. Bad Boys For Life (Sony) also returned to the Top 10, at No. 6, while Little Women (Sony) climbed to No. 7.

Last Christmas (Universal) dropped two places to No. 8, as Jumanji: The Next Level (Sony) rose to No. 9, and Warner’s Birds of Prey finished at No. 10.

The Official Film Chart Top 10 – Jan. 6, 2021

Rank Previous Week Title Studio
1 1 Tenet Warner
2 New The New Mutants Disney/Marvel Films
3 2 Roald Dahl’s The Witches Warner
4 4 Love Actually Universal Pictures Home Entertainment
5 Return Spider-Man: Far From Home Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
6 25 Bad Boys For Life SPHE
7 18 Little Women (2019) SPHE
8 6 Last Christmas UPHE
9 40 Jumanji: The Next Level SPHE
10 24 Birds of Paradise and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn Warner

© Official Charts Company 2021

2020 U.K. Home Entertainment Revenue Jumped 26%; Warner’s ‘Joker’ Top-Selling Title

Following a 2020 that saw the coronavirus pandemic upend the global entertainment industry, home entertainment in the United Kingdom blossomed, with revenue up 26% to £3.3 billion ($4.5 billion) compared with £2.6 billion ($3.5 billion) in 2019, according to new data from the British Association for Screen Entertainment, the Official Charts Company, Futuresource Consulting and Kantar.

Top-selling title in 2020: Warner Home Video’s Joker, with the Oscar-winning drama tallying 1.4 million units across digital and physical formats. The four best-selling titles all topped one million transactions across disc, EST and TVOD, and the balance of the Top 10 all exceeded 500,000 transactions. In short, it was a banner year for U.S. studios.

“2020 saw digital home video reach new heights, with digital sell-through and rental growth accelerating despite pandemic enforced movie delays,” David Sidebottom, principal analyst, entertainment, Futuresource Consulting, said in a statement. “The strength of library content has been truly impressive and sustained throughout the year, even more notable given the continued proliferation of wider video streaming services.”

Like much of the world, the No. 2 home entertainment market saw consumers staying home in the face of the threat from coronavirus, with digital formats making huge gains; taking advantage of the instant access and range of content choice. Total electronic sellthrough (or digital purchase) sales across both film and TV content delivered 14.5% growth year-on-year after a record period of growth during the March lockdown.

Spend on TVOD (transactional video-on-demand), supported by shoppers new to the category, saw almost 24% growth. Kantar reported that the total number of customers buying and renting across the video category grew by 14% between March and November to 12.9 million as audiences sought flexible access to content across transactional methods.

At the same time, SVOD continued its meteoric growth, up an astounding 42% in 2020. Streaming services now account for 74% of the total market value, with new services joining the market in 2020 such as Disney+, and an expansion in the uptake of existing services such as Netflix or Amazon Prime Video during the first lockdown period. Kantar also revealed that 23% of British households signed up to a subscription service during the first quarter — around the time Disney+ launched with a further 7% and 3.5% of households, respectively, doing so in the following two quarters of the year.

Driven by catalog titles, re-releases and select new titles, 30% of consumers bought packaged media (DVD, Blu-ray Disc and 4K UHD Blu-ray), up from 25% in 2019.

“The shift to digital doesn’t diminish the resilience of physical formats, though, as evidenced by the performance of TV and catalog content on disc, and by the strength of premium formats like Blu-ray and 4K UHD, both underlining that many viewers are still driven by collection and the access to the best possible home viewing experience that disc provides,” said Liz Bales, CEO of BASE.

Electronic Sellthrough

Electronic sellthrough ended 2020 with 27% growth in volume and 16% in value, with digital formats accounting for more than 43% of the transactional market. During the first 12-week lockdown period, the share of spend for digital film was 45% of the total £138.6 million retail disc and EST spend, up from 26% across the same period in 2019. This huge growth was largely retained after lockdown, with EST ending the year with 36% of spend, up from 26% in 2019.

Due in part to shifts in the new release slate, catalog content has grown its share of all film EST transactions from 49% to 56% in 2020, the catalog share is up 42% year on year, with positive growth every week since the first lockdown period.

VOD

The year saw title-level data on transactional video-on-demand activity become available for the first time from the Official Charts Company and based on data from digital retailers, delivering a view of consumer engagement with VOD services. VOD activity saw a period of rapid growth during the COVID-19 March lockdown, with an average of 600,000 rentals per week before lockdown rising to more than 1 million rentals a week after lockdown was implemented.

Digital rental’s popularity is now evident, with more than 30.8 million rental transactions made through October (Q4 data will be available in Q1 2021), a significant portion of the total 75 million pieces of content that have either been purchased or rented across disc, film EST and VOD.

The year also saw distributors adopt a test and trial approach to bring content to consumers with the likes of premium EST and premium VOD (PVOD). Kantar reports that 1.1 million shoppers have rented a PVOD title since March (with the ‘Premium’ element being classified as a rental price above £10), accounting for 6% of all digital rentals and 20% of total rental spend.

Proving the value in these high-definition disc formats, 2020 saw an increase in average selling price across the Blu-ray format, up 7.1% year-on-year to £15.94 ($21.75). Echoing its performance on other formats, catalog content has thrived on Blu-ray, remaining in positive growth and ending the year with a value of over £73 million ($99.5 million).

Consumers continued to show strong engagement with 4K Ultra High Definition, with sales up 20% year-on-year, and accounting for 23% of total Blu-ray sales. High value re-releases of catalog content thrived in 2020, with a vast array of classic content given the 4K UHD treatment. Total consumer spend topped £19.2 million ($26.2 million), which accounted for 73% of total 4K UHD spend.

Consumers have proven in 2020 that there is continuing demand to own classic catalog titles on premium disc formats, and with a huge treasure trove of content yet to receive re-releases, the 564 titles currently available on the 4K UHD format seems likely to keep rising entering 2021.

Television Content

TV content proved to be robust in the disc market, with 28% consumer spending, up from 23% in 2019. During the second and third quarter of 2020, with the flow of new-release movies impacted by national lockdown measures, TV content showed a growth of 5.4% to a 26% of consumer spend in this period.

Catalog TV content soared, with growth of 5.7% year-on-year surpassing £80 million ($109 million), with the category accounting for three of the top four best-selling TV titles of the year. Top-selling titles included Game of Thrones S8 (Warner Bros.), Chernobyl (Acorn Video by RLJ Entertainment), BBC Studios’ Doctor Who Classic Series Blu-ray Collections; Outlander S5 (Sony Pictures Home Entertainment); Downton Abbey the Complete Collection (Universal), and Gangs of London (Dazzler Media).

New releases such as The Crown S3 (Sony) and Gavin & Stacey: A Christmas Special (BBC Studios) also excelled, ending the year in third and seventh place, respectively, in the TV chart. BBC Studios’ newly commissioned animations of lost “Doctor Who” episodes, “The Faceless Ones” and “Fury from the Deep,” also performed well, contributing to combined sales across all content came at £4.9 million ($6.7 million), a 15% year-on-year growth from 2019.

Market Share

Disney ended the year as the leading distributor across combined disc and digital volume sales, with a 19.1% share, with Frozen 2 leading the way with 1.3 million units sold. Universal Pictures Home Entertainment continued its reign as the largest distributor across disc sales for both volume and value, remaining a full percentage point above the second-place distributor.

2021 Slate

Looking ahead to 2021, as the U.K. public cautiously anticipates the return to normality in a vaccinated post-pandemic world, so does home entertainment. With Tenet (Warner) performing strongly across digital and premium disc formats in the final weeks of 2020, and as the first major new release title to launch since the spring, consumer demand is clearly high, with a plethora of titles ready to perform across a diverse 2021 slate.

Pending releases include Minions: The Rise of Gru (Universal), Luca (Disney), Peter Rabbit 2: The Runaway (Sony), and Tom and Jerry (Warner). Other releases include James Corden’s musical take on Cinderella (Sony), and Everybody’s Talking About Jamie (Disney); superhero spinoffs and sequels with Disney’s Eternals and Black Widow, as well as Venom: Let There Be Carnage (Sony) and Warner’s Suicide Squad and Wonder Woman 1984; Antlers (Disney); Spiral (Lionsgate distributed by Elevation Sales) and Last Night in Soho (Universal).

Universal’s F9; Ghostbusters: Afterlife (Sony); A Quiet Place Part II (Paramount Pictures), Top Gun: Maverick (Paramount), Space Jam: A New Legacy (Warner), and No Time to Die (Universal).

“Amongst the many seismic changes in consumption habits that 2020 has seen, the most encouraging for home entertainment was the indication that subscription services and transactional formats can not only co-exist, but grow in tandem,” said Craig Armer, strategic insight director, Worldpanel Entertainment. “For the first time in at least 8 years, the number of buyers and renters of transactional formats grew, helped by a complete resurgence in the popularity of VOD. Encouraging levels of return for a second purchase amongst new consumers suggests habits being formed that should continue into 2021.”

Warner’s ‘Elf’ Atop U.K. Home Entertainment Chart for Third Straight Week

Warner Home Video’s enduring 2003 catalog release Elf finished atop the Official Film Chart in the U.K. for the third consecutive week (ended Dec. 16) — driven by transactional VOD, which accounted for 75% of the title’s unit sales.

Universal Pictures Home Entertainment’s Last Christmas again finished No. 2, spurred by strong DVD and Blu-ray Disc sales. Separately, Universal’s holiday-themed releases The Grinch (No. 3) and Love Actually (No. 4) maintained their positions for another week.

Disney-owned 20th Century Home Entertainment’s Home Alone, and Warner’s The Polar Express moved up one spot, respectively at No. 5 and No. 6. Disney’s Mulan dropped two places to No. 7, while 1992’s The Muppet Christmas Carol entered the chart at No. 8 for the first time.

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Finally, Home Alone 2: Lost In New York (20th Century) soared 20 places to No. 9, while Disney’s Frozen II climbed three places to round off the countdown at No. 10.

Rank Previous Week Title, Studio Peak
Pos.
Week on Chart
1 1
Elf
Warner Home Video
1 20
2 2
Last Christmas
Universal Pictures Home Entertainment
1 10
3 3
The Grinch
Universal
2 17
4 4
Love Actually
Universal
4 9
5
Home Alone
20th Century Home Entertainment
5 14
6
The Polar Express
Warner
6 17
7
Mulan
Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment
1 5
8 28 
The Muppet Christmas Carol
Jim Henson Video
8 7
9 29 
Home Alone 2: Lost in New York
20th Century Home Entertainment
9 5
10 13 
Frozen II
Disney
1 39

 

Warner’s ‘Elf’ Stands Tall Again on U.K. Home Entertainment Chart

Christmas is officially here, as Warner Home Video’s Elf stands tall at No. 1 on the Official Film Chart in the United Kingdom through Dec. 9, as the 2003 comedy with  Will Ferrell marks a second week atop the Top 10. The title added 30,000 unit sales, with 73% made up of digital downloads.

Meanwhile, Universal Pictures Home Entertainment’s Last Christmas improved one place to No. 2, just a few thousand sales behind, while the studio’s The Grinch inched closer to the top, rising five places to No. 3.

One of the U.K.’s most treasured Christmas flicks, Love Actually, entered the Top 10 for the first time, landing at No. 4, while Disney’s live-action remake of Mulan dropped three to No. 5. Home Alone (20th Century Home Entertainment) soared up 28 places to its highest peak yet of No. 6, and Warner’s The Polar Express climbed eight spots to No. 7. Sam Mendes’ critically acclaimed World War I drama 1917 dropped one place to No. 8.

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A Christmas Gift From Bob — the sequel to 2016’s feel-good biographical film A Street Cat Named Bob — debuted at No. 9 following its release on disc by Lionsgate U.K. Finally, a 4K UHD Blu-ray Disc release from Warner of the The Lord of the Rings Trilogy entered the Official Film Chart for the first time at No. 10.

The Official Film Chart Top 10 – Dec. 9, 2020

Rank Previous Week
Title Studio
1 1 Elf Warner
2 3 Last Christmas Universal
3 8 The Grinch Universal
4 11 Love Actually Universal
5 2 Mulan (2020)
Disney
6 34 Home Alone Disney/20th Century
7 15 The Polar Express Warner
8 7 1917 Entertainment One
9 New A Christmas Gift From Bob Lionsgate U.K.
10 New The Lord of the Rings Trilogy Warner

© Official Charts Company 2020

Warner’s ‘Elf’ Climbs Atop Official U.K. Film Chart

Warner Bros. Home Entertainment’s Elf climbed to No. 1 on the U.K. home entertainment Official Film Chart through Dec. 2. The 2003 movie starring Will Ferrell finished atop the weekly chart for the first time since the chart’s inception in 2018.

Disney’s live action remake of Mulan dropped to No. 2 after two weeks on the top rung. Last Christmas (Universal) held on at No. 3 as The Greatest Showman (20th Century) climbed seven spots to No. 4. Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (Lucasfilm) soared 10 spots to No. 5 following the release of a new 4K UHD Blu-ray Disc Steelbook edition.

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This week’s highest new entry was psychological thriller Unhinged (No. 6), starring Russell Crowe and Caren Pistorious. Entertainment One’s 1917 moved down one spot to No. 7, as did Jim Carrey in The Grinch at No. 8. Universal’s Trolls World Tour climbed seven spots to No. 9. Finally, Kristen Stewart and Mackenzie Davis’ new festive rom-com, Happiest Season debuted at No. 10 on digital downloads only.

The Official Film Chart Top 10 – Dec. 2, 2020

Rank Last Week Title Studio
1 2 Elf Warner
2 1 Mulan Disney
3 3 Last Christmas Universal
4 11 The Greatest Showman 20th Century
5 15 Star Wars – The Rise of Skywalker Disney
6 New Unhinged Altitude Spirit
7 6 1917 eOne
8 7 The Grinch Universal
9 16 Trolls World Tour DreamWorks Animation
10 New Happiest Season eOne

© Official Charts Company 2020