Warner Releasing HBO Docs on Disc, Digital

Warner Bros. Home Entertainment is releasing four titles from HBO’s documentary film library for purchase on digital. From true crime to social justice exposés, the newly available offerings will be sold separately in both high and standard definition formats.

Titles include True Justice: Bryan Stevenson’s Fight for Equality, available Jan. 21 for $12.99 SRP/HD and $9.99 SRP/SD ($14.99 SRP/HD and $12.99 SRP/SD in Canada); I Love You, Now Die, available Jan. 7 for $19.99 SRP/HD and SD ($24.99 SRP HD and SD in Canada); Who Killed Garrett Phillips?, available Jan. 20 for $19.99 SRP/HD and SD ($24.99 SRP/HD and SD in Canada) and, Alternate Endings: Six New Ways to Die in America, available Feb. 10 for $12.99 SRP/HD and $9.99 SRP/SD ($14.99 SRP/HD and $12.99 SRP/SD in Canada).

All titles are available from various retailers, including Apple TV, Amazon Prime Video, Google Play, Vudu, PlayStation, Microsoft and others.

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True Justice: Bryan Stevenson’s Fight for Equality will be available on DVD courtesy of Warner Archive Collection. The DVD includes all the same content on the digital release and is also arriving Jan. 21, 2020. Warner Archive DVD releases are found at wb.com/warnerarchive.

The release of True Justice: Bryan Stevenson’s Fight for Equality on digital and DVD is timed to the feature film release of Warner Bros. Pictures’ “Just Mercy,” a new drama based on a memoir written by Bryan Stevenson, which stars Michael B. Jordan, Jamie Foxx and Brie Larson.

“We are pleased to offer these four remarkable films, which explore important issues in enlightening and entertaining ways,” Rosemary Markson, SVP of TV marketing, said in a statement.

From Emmy winners Peter, George and Teddy Kunhardt (King in the Wilderness, John McCain: For Whom the Bell Tolls), this feature documentary follows Bryan Stevenson – lawyer and founder of the Equal Justice Initiative — through his experiences as a capital defense attorney and advocate for community-based reform.

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As a young lawyer in the 1980s, Stevenson witnessed firsthand how courts unfairly applied the death penalty based on race and the Supreme Court ultimately declared that racial bias in the administration of the death penalty was “inevitable.”

The film interweaves watershed moments from Stevenson’s cases with insights from his clients, colleagues and members of his family and focuses on Stevenson’s life and career — particularly his indictment of the U.S. criminal-justice system for its role in codifying modern systemic racism and tracks the intertwined histories of slavery, lynching, segregation and mass incarceration.

An intimate portrait of a remarkable man, the film chronicles Stevenson’s work in Alabama, the birthplace of the Civil Rights Movement and home to the Equal Justice Initiative, as well as the early influences that drove him to become an advocate for the poor and the incarcerated. The film follows his struggle to create greater fairness in the system and shows how racial injustice emerged, evolved and continues to threaten the country, and challenges viewers to confront it.

I Love You, Now Die (Available Jan. 7 on digital): Directed by Erin Lee Carr (At the Heart of Gold: Inside the USA Gymnastics Scandal, Mommy Dead and Dearest), “I Love You, Now Die” is a two-part documentary about the recent texting suicide case that captured national interest, raising difficult questions about technology, mental health, and whether or not one teenager can be held responsible for the suicide of another.

In July 2014, 18-year-old Conrad Roy committed suicide in his truck at a parking lot in Fairhaven, Massachusetts. Police later discovered a series of text messages in which his girlfriend, 17-year-old Michelle Carter seemed to encourage him to kill himself, an unearthing that sparked a controversial case that had the potential to redefine accountability in the digital age.

The two-part film unpacks that complicated relationship between Carter and Roy, utilizing some of the thousands of texts they exchanged over two years as a record in real time of their courtship and its tragic consequences.

Featuring unprecedented access to the families, friends, and communities that were forever changed by this unusual case, I Love You, Now Die explores the changing nature of the justice system at the hands of technology, following a story “that has wider implications for society at large, online and IRL.”

Who Killed Garrett Phillips? (Available Jan. 20 on Digital): From Oscar-nominated director Liz Garbus (What Happened, Miss Simone?), Who Killed Garrett Phillips? examines the 2011 murder of 12-year-old Garrett Phillips and subsequent trial of Clarkson University soccer coach Oral “Nick” Hillary, a black man living in the mostly-white town of Potsdam, New York, who was charged with second-degree murder.

The two-part documentary chronicles the five years following the murder, as Garrett’s family and community relentlessly seek justice for Garrett, and as Nick, who maintains his innocence, fights to clear his name and take back control of his life while raising five children.

Through exclusive interviews with investigators, lawyers and Hillary himself, along with extensive police and video recordings, Who Killed Garrett Phillips? is a true-crime documentary that takes on issues of racial fairness in law enforcement, while trying to uncover the truth behind both the horrific murder of a young boy that traumatized a town and the vilification of a black man who was swept up in a dogged quest for justice.

Alternate Endings: Six New Ways to Die in America offers a look at the varied ways Americans are choosing to celebrate life as it comes to an end. With attitudes about death and end-of-life choices rapidly changing, 2018 saw the first time more Americans chose cremation over more expensive burials, disrupting the $16 billion a year funeral industry.

As the baby boomer generation approaches death, more and more are rethinking the way end of life is recognized and are deciding to take control of what will happen when they die.

Alternate Endings tells six stories of people nearing death, as well as family members of the recently deceased, who have chosen non-traditional burial options, from celebrations of life and living wakes to green burials, space burials and more.

The film explores what it means to be near death, either from age or terminal illness, and captures that healing power of honoring, giving thanks and staying true to loved ones who have passed away.

‘Leaving Neverland,’ New Seasons of ‘Vice’ and ‘Crashing’ Among Titles From HBO in April

April is chock-full of releases on digital and DVD from HBO Home Entertainment, including the controversial Michael Jackson documentary Leaving Neverland.

The two-part documentary Leaving Neverland, due on digital download April 29, explores the separate, but parallel experiences of two young boys, James “Jimmy” Safechuck, at age 10, and Wade Robson, at age 7, both of whom were befriended by Jackson. They and their families were invited into his world, entranced by the singer’s fairy-tale existence as his career reached its peak. Through gut-wrenching interviews with Safechuck, now 37, and Robson, now 41, as well as their mothers, wives and siblings, Leaving Neverland crafts a portrait of sustained abuse, exploring the complicated feelings that led both men to confront their experiences after both had a young son of their own.

Crashing Season 3 is coming to digital April 1. The show’s third season finds Pete reinvigorated — and no longer crashing on people’s couches — as he reenters the New York stand-up comedy world following his college tour. But even though he’s improved, that doesn’t mean he’s at the head of the pack. As Pete edges closer to success one stand-up set at a time, he continues to navigate his faith, dating and the ever-changing comedy scene.

The documentary Student Athlete, due on digital April 8, unveils the exploitative world of high-revenue college sports through the stories of four young men at different stages of their athletic careers, as well as a coach-turned-advocate and a whistle-blowing shoe rep who exposes the money trail. From high-school recruiting to post-graduation, the usefulness of athletes is tied to their ability to produce revenue.

Wyatt Cenac’s Problem Areas Season 2, coming to digital April 15, focuses on education in America, investigating teacher pay, student mental health, the school-to-prison pipeline and other pressing topics. Cenac visits West Virginia, Oregon, California, Minnesota and other areas around the country to learn how communities navigate issues facing public education. While education serves as the season’s primary focus, the show addresses other issues, including the unionization of fast-food workers and the potential dangers of facial recognition software, as well as comedic solutions to lighter topics, such as how to get more steps in at the office or how to teach kids practical skills, like filing taxes.

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Also due on digital April 15 is High Maintenance Season 3, which profiles everyday people whose stories of success, failure, love and loss intersect across New York, while delving deeper into personal life of The Guy, who is spending less time on his iconic bicycle and more time in “Steve RV,” a set of wheels gifted to him last season. Featuring an intricate web of returning characters and new faces, the new episodes find New Yorkers exploring their relationship with the city, touching on such themes as death, parenthood, sexuality, fantasy and aging.

Vice Season 6, another title coming on digital April 15, continues to explore under-covered global stories with exclusive reports from Iraq, Russia, the Central African Republic and China. Season six also focuses on the domestic issues dividing the nation, providing in-depth reporting on the major debates surrounding gun laws, immigration, economics, education, civil rights and America’s place in the world.

Coming on digital April 29 is Outside the Bubble: A Road Trip with Alexandra Pelosi. The show follows Pelosi as she ventures beyond the coast and sets out on a cross-country trip to engage in conversations with fellow Americans in an effort to gain an unfiltered understanding of other perspectives.

Also due on digital April 29 is Strike Back Season 6. When a Russian bomber crashes in the South China Sea, the covert special-ops soldiers of Section 20 — Thomas “Mac” McAllister (Warren Brown), Samuel Wyatt (Daniel MacPherson) and Gracie Novin (Alin Sumarwata) — are sent to investigate. There, they cross paths with Katrina Zarkova (Yasemin Allen), a rogue Russian operative with questionable loyalties. Under orders of the new commanding officer, Col. Alexander Coltrane (Jamie Bamber), Section 20 pursues stolen contents of the Russian jet across Southeast Asia. They work alongside the Malaysian police to shut down a Triad gang in Kuala Lumpur, uncover a corrupt plot by a wealthy Indian businesswoman running for Parliament and plunge into the jungles of the Golden Triangle in Myanmar, facing off against mercenary drug agents and terrifying warlords as they uncover a conspiracy that threatens to push the world to the brink of global conflict.

HBO is also releasing two titles on DVD in April.

Coming April 2 is My Brilliant Friend. When the most important friend in her life seems to have disappeared without a trace, Elena Greco, a now-elderly woman immersed in a house full of books, turns on her computer and starts writing the story of their friendship. Set in a Naples, their story goes on to cover more than 60 years of their lives as she tries to describe the mystery of Lila, Elena’s brilliant friend and — in a way — both her best friend and her worst enemy.

Written and directed by Daniel Sawka, Icebox, available on DVD April 16, tells the story of Oscar, played by Anthony Gonzalez (Coco), a 12-year-old Honduran boy who is forced to flee his home and seek asylum in the United States. As Oscar attempts to reach his uncle, Manuel, in Arizona, he is apprehended by the Border Patrol and placed in “the icebox.” Faced with a seemingly impenetrable immigration system, Oscar struggles to navigate a path to freedom, with a journalist and his uncle, himself a recent immigrant, as his only lifelines.

Sony Bringing Documentary ‘Elvis Presley: The Searcher’ to Disc Oct. 16

Sony Pictures Home Entertainment will release the three-hour HBO documentary Elvis Presley: The Searcher on DVD Oct. 16.

The film collects material from the archives of Graceland to present an inside look at a rarely seen side of the King of rock ‘n’ roll, taking the audience on a comprehensive creative journey from his childhood through the final 1976 Jungle Room recording sessions.

Containing never-before-seen footage and music recordings, the film features commentary and interviews from some of the biggest names in music, including Tom Petty, Bruce Springsteen, Emmylou Harris, music producer Jon Landau and Elvis’ guitarist, Scotty Moore, among others.

Also included is the featurette “In Conversation,” a Q&A with director Thom Zimny, executive producers Priscilla Presley and Jerry Schilling, and Grammy Museum executive director Scott Goldman.

A limited collector’s edition DVD will include commemorative packaging and a 20-page digibook featuring rare photos from the Graceland archives.