Fox Nation SVOD Service Launching Nov. 27

Fox Nation, the politically conservative-themed subscription streaming video-on-demand service coming from 21st Century Fox, is launching after the midterm elections on Nov. 27, priced at $5.99 monthly or $64.99 annually.

Starting Oct. 28, consumers can sign up for special pre-release pricing at www.foxnation.com.

Programming – featuring long and short-form content, includes documentaries on Judge Robert Bork’s failed confirmation to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1987 and Fox News legal analyst Gregg Jarrett’s The Russia Hoax, which claims the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election is really an attempt to “clear Hillary Clinton and frame Donald Trump.”

“Hannity’s America: The Clarence Thomas Story” details the highly contentious confirmation hearings in 1991 and his book My Grandfather’s Son, about his own background and the events that brought him to the Supreme Court.

“What Made America Great,” hosted by “Fox & Friends” co-host Brian Kilmeade, aims to reveal the hidden history and ongoing controversies behind some of America’s most iconic locations, including The Alamo, Fraunces Tavern, Fort Jefferson and Mount Rushmore.

Finally, conservative cheerleader Tomi Lahren’s online segment, “Final Thoughts,” will move to Fox Nation.

 

 

‘Fox Nation’ SVOD Service Reveals Programming Slate

Fox Nation, the pending subscription streaming video-on-demand service coming from 21st Century Fox, Oct. 9 disclosed a slate of programming that includes documentaries, investigative series and patriotic specials geared toward politically conservative audiences.

“We are confident there will be an offering for every Fox News viewer,” John Finley, SVP of development of production, said in a statement.

Programming includes documentaries on Judge Robert Bork’s failed confirmation to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1987 and Fox News legal analyst Gregg Jarrett’s The Russia Hoax, which claims the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election is really an attempt to “clear Hillary Clinton and frame Donald Trump.”

Other programming includes:

“Hannity’s America: The Clarence Thomas Story,” which will detail the highly contentious confirmation hearings in 1991 and his book My Grandfather’s Son, about his own background and the events that brought him to the Supreme Court.

“What Made America Great,” hosted by “Fox & Friends” co-host Brian Kilmeade, aims to reveal the hidden history and ongoing controversies behind some of America’s most iconic locations, including, The Alamo, Fraunces Tavern, Fort Jefferson and Mount Rushmore.

Former Los Angeles Police Department detective Mark Fuhrman reveals private thoughts and analysis on criminal cases that have defined America this past half century in “The Fuhrman Diaries.” From the cases that he was involved in personally, like O.J. Simpson and Martha Moxley, to the cases he has obsessed over for years such as the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Fuhrman shares his personal notes and analysis of the criminal cases that have defined the last half century.

“The First Family” features the Trump family beyond the headlines. In the premiere installment of this series, Eric Trump takes us behind the scenes, including an inside look at his office, behind the scenes of business trips and at home with his wife Lara and son Luke. The episode will also feature a sit-down interview with the president’s son, speaking with Fox Business Network’s Maria Bartiromo offering his perspective on everything from politics to family life.

The director’s cut, never before seen extended version of the docuseries, “Scandalous,” that previously aired on Fox News Channel, covers the investigations of President Bill Clinton by the Office of Independent Counsel and offers a look at the failed 1980s Whitewater land deal. From the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas to the final determination made by prosecutor Robert Ray on Clinton’s last day in office, the series documents the political drama that enveloped Washington and captivated the world during the 1990’s.

The director’s cut of never before seen extended version of the docuseries “Scandalous: Chappaquiddick,” will examine the story of the late-night accident with Senator Ted Kennedy. What really happened that night in July 1969? Told through the eyes of the people who were there and in a rare interview, the family of the victim who has been all but forgotten in the popular versions of the story.

“Scandalous: The Mysterious Case of Tawana Brawley” will take a look into the controversial rape case that inflamed racial tensions at a crucial time in our nation’s history. Civil rights leaders and Brawley’s supporters demanded justice for the teenager, but a grand jury would determine she had fabricated the entire story, damaging innocent lives in the process.

“Scandalous: ABSCAM” follows Mel Weinberg and several FBI agents as they orchestrate an elaborate undercover sting operation involving a faux Arab sheik, briefcases of cash, hidden cameras, and eventually, six congressmen and one U.S. Senator. The legendary FBI sting known as ABSCAM leads to such shocking revelations and controversy that decades later would inspire the Oscar-nominated film American Hustle.

“Riddle: The Search for James R. Hoffa” is a special about the most famous missing man in America, union boss James Riddle Hoffa who disappeared on July 30, 1975. Hosted by Eric Shawn, “Riddle” is the culmination of an extensive FOX News investigation with new forensic details of the crime scene.

Helmed by “Fox & Friends Weekend” co-host Pete Hegseth, “Ace of Spades: The Hunt for Saddam Hussein” will feature interviews with soldiers, military leaders and intelligence officers who tell the story of how American soldiers tracked down and captured former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein.

“Uncommon Knowledge,” hosted by Hoover Institution fellow Peter Robinson, will also be available on Fox Nation. For more than two decades, the talk show series has showcased famous figures, including Dr. Henry Kissinger, Justice Antonin Scalia and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice.

Finally, “Watters World” features 20+ hours of the best of host Jesse Watters’ “Watters World” man-on-the street segments that previously aired on FNC, providing viewers with a pulse of the nation on everything from politics to pop culture.

Miss America Contest Dropping Bikini Competition

In a nod to the #MeToo movement and an internal sexual harassment scandal, the Miss America Organization is dropping the swimsuit competition from its next pageant in September.

The change was revealed June 5 in a tweet by reigning Miss America Cara Mund, as well as by Gretchen Carlson, former Fox News host and now chairwoman of the Atlantic City, N.J.-based pageant on ABC TV’s “Good Morning America” show.

“We want more women to know that they are welcome in this organization,” Carlson said. “We are not going to judge you on your outward appearance.”

“We are changing out of our swimsuits and into a whole new era,” Mund tweeted.

Carlson in 2016 filed a sexual harassment lawsuit against Fox News and its late boss Roger Ailes, which ended in a $20 million settlement for Carlson.

The 1989 Miss America winner said the competition — which started in 1921 in Atlantic City — would instead focus on contestants’ intelligence, opinions and talents.

“People actually like the talent part of the competition,” Carlson said.

How TV viewers react to the change remains to be seen.

Playboy in 2016 made news when it dropped female nudity from the famed publication started by the late Hugh Hefner. The change lasted less than a year when Hefner’s son Cooper, chief creative officer at Playboy, said removing nudity from the publication had been a mistake.

“Today we’re taking our identity back and reclaiming who we are,” he tweeted in 2017.

 

Hulu Pulls Ads From ‘The Laura Ingraham Show’

Hulu has pulled TV commercials from “The Laura Ingraham Show” on Fox News following the conservative host’s tweets mocking a high school student survivor of the recent Parkland, Fla., shooting.

“We’d like to confirm that we are no longer advertising on Laura Ingraham’s and are monitoring all of our ad placements carefully,” Hulu said in a March 29 Twitter post.

The subscription streaming video service, co-owned by The Walt Disney Co., 21st Century Fox, Comcast and Time Warner, joined a growing group of advertisers (including TripAdvisor, Expedia, Wayfair and Johnson & Johnson) that have pulled spots.

The controversy involves David Hogg, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, who survived the Valentine’s Day (Feb. 14) mass shooting where gunman (and former student) Nikolas Cruz allegedly killed 14 students and three teachers with an assault weapon.

Hogg, along with other students, has become a face of the tragedy and emerging gun control activist, speaking out on national media. He is a founding member, along with 19 other students, of the “Never Again MSD” advocacy group that has spearheaded movements against gun violence, including the March 24 “March for Our Lives” demonstration that attracted hundreds of thousands of protesters nationwide.

Ingraham, along with other conservatives in the media, have criticized Hogg as a mouthpiece of a liberal agenda aimed at curbing gun rights they claim are guaranteed under the 2nd Amendment of the Constitution.

But Ingraham went one step further, attacking Hogg personally on social media.

The former MSNBC host, who worked as a speech writer for President Reagan, clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and guest-hosted the former “The O’Reilly Factor” on Fox News, called Hogg a “whiner” for not getting accepted into UCLA, despite reportedly having a 4.1 grade point average.

“David Hogg Rejected By Four Colleges To Which He Applied and whines about it. (Dinged by UCLA with a 4.1 GPA…totally predictable given acceptance rates.),” Ingraham tweeted, linking it to an online story about four universities that reportedly rejected Hogg’s college admissions application.

“In our view, these statements focused on a high school student, cross the line of decency. As such, we have made a decision to stop advertising on that program,” a spokesperson for TripAdvisor.com said in a statement.

Home furnishing company WayFair, in a statement, said it supports open dialogue and debate on issues – with restrictions.

“The decision of an adult to personally criticize a high school student who has lost his classmates in an unspeakable tragedy is not consistent with our values. We do not plan to continue advertising on this particular program,” the ecommerce company said in a statement.

Ingraham – who courted controversy last month criticizing NBA superstar LeBron James’ comment about President Trump not understanding black people – made no comment of the Hogg controversy on her March 29 show and has apologized for her comment, tweeting:

“Any student should be proud of a 4.2 GPA —incl. @DavidHogg111. On reflection, in the spirit of Holy Week, I apologize for any upset or hurt my tweet caused him or any of the brave victims of Parkland. For the record, I believe my show was the first to feature David…”

 

Fox News Launching SVOD Service for Base Audience

Rupert Murdoch helped establish a cable news juggernaut with Fox News. Now he wants Fox News, including notable political pundit Sean Hannity and others, i.e. “Fox & Friends,” to go over-the-top through a standalone subscription streaming service.

Dubbed Fox Nation, the service featuring right-leaning commentary is set to launch at the end of the year. The price of the service has not been disclosed.

Designed to enhance the Fox News viewer experience, Fox Nation will take a deep dive into the big issues of the day with live daily streaming content and long-form programming. Fox Nation will also include access to events and 20 plus years of archival FNC programming. Interaction with all of FNC’s popular opinion hosts and personalities will also be a mainstay of the new platform.

“Fox Nation is designed to appeal to the Fox superfan,” John Finley, head of program development and production at Fox News, told The New York Times. “These are the folks who watch Fox News every night for hours at a time, the dedicated audience that really wants more of what we have to offer.”

The service comes as other media giants seek out SVOD platforms to buttress dwindling pay-TV markets.

Disney, by the second quarter, will launch ESPN Plus, a standalone service intended to compliment ESPN. CBS has more than 2.5 million subs for CBS All Access, in addition to free ad-supported CBSN, featuring news.

Whether Fox News’ older demographic will go for SVOD — which is largely popular among younger audiences, including millennials — remains to be seen.

Finley isn’t worried.

“We know who our audience is. We know what they want,” he said.