Top Gun: Maverick

4K ULTRA HD BLU-RAY REVIEW:

Street Date 11/1/22;
Paramount;
Action;
Box Office $716.58 million;
$25.99 DVD, $31.99 Blu-ray, $37.99 UHD BD;
Rated ‘PG-13’ for sequences of intense action, and some strong language.
Stars Tom Cruise, Jennifer Connelly, Miles Teller, Glen Powell, Monica Barbaro, Lewis Pullman, Jay Ellis, Bashir Salahuddin, Charles Parnell, Jon Hamm, Val Kilmer.

Among the many considerable plaudits earned by Top Gun: Maverick during a historic box office run, one of the most remarkable might be the degree to which it retroactively makes its predecessor a better film.

The long-awaited (and pandemic-delayed) sequel to 1986’s Top Gun finds Pete Mitchell, callsign Maverick, the hotshot fighter pilot played by Tom Cruise, older but not much wiser — still flaunting the rules and refusing to evolve beyond his core identity as a naval aviator.

Tucked away from official duty while serving as a test pilot for a new stealth fighter called the Darkstar, Maverick is summoned back to Top Gun with orders to train a group of elite graduates from the famed dogfighting school for a mission to bomb an illegal nuclear facility in an unnamed rogue nation (which is definitely not Iran, wink wink). The mission is said to be nearly impossible to pull off, with the pilots forced to contend not only with GPS jamming and anti-aircraft missiles, but also the threat of new technologically superior fifth-generation enemy fighters. The key to survival will be how could the pilot in the cockpit truly is.

The film is essentially what it would feel like if the entirety of the first “Star Wars” movie were focused just on the pilots training for and carrying out the attack on the Death Star.

As to Maverick’s own personal growth, one stumbling block may be that he still blames himself for the death of his best friend, Goose, in the original film. The sequel, thus, provides some measure of a pathway to atonement in the form of Goose’s son, Rooster (Miles Teller), who is among the new generation of pilots vying for a spot in the mission, and who resents Maverick for trying to impede his own career.

In his return to San Diego (even though in real life that’s not where Top Gun is located anymore), Maverick even gets a chance to catch up with old flame Penny (Jennifer Connelly), whose character is mentioned in the original film as a prior dalliance for the young pilot.

Thus, the two films, when taken together, tell the grand arc of Maverick learning where he fits in the world — and either adjusting to the new reality or testing its limits until it kills him.

While it also succeeds on its own merits, the sequel is evocative of the original but not a straight retread. There are scenes and characters that echo what came before, but the screenplay uses such nostalgia to enhance the story, rather than rely on it. In turn, circumstances of the original film take on greater meaning now that we know how they pay off.

That’s because Top Gun: Maverick works on so many levels, from an emotionally exhilarating story of an ersatz family coming together, to an eminently watchable, fist-pumping patriotic thrill ride.

Joseph Kosinski proves to be a deft choice for the director’s chair, bringing his reputation for strong visual dynamics to bear in making the film seem like a tribute to the late Tony Scott, whose work helming the original helped redefine the action genre. Fittingly, Top Gun: Maverick is a throwback to the heyday of action films that didn’t try to be more than they needed to be — entertaining crowds with charismatic movie stars, exciting combat, a love story to raise the stakes, and some chart-topping pop tunes (which in the case of this film should give Lady Gaga a chance at another Oscar).

The aerial photography is breathtaking, with the only potential drawback from a visual standpoint being the use of the F-18 Superhornet as the primary hero fighter. The F-18 has been featured in a lot of movies before, but it looks like a generic assembly line fighter jet and just doesn’t have the sexy big-screen presence of the F-14 Tomcat, which was featured in the original film.

Of course, switching from the F-14 to the F-18 was pretty much mandated by the constraints of reality, as the Tomcat was retired from active service in 2006, replaced by the F-18 as the primary naval fighter (with the F-35 set to take on more prominence going forward). The only country today still flying the F-14 in their fleets is Iran (just like the “fictional” enemy in the film, wink wink).

Cinematically, the film takes the original’s catchphrase of “the need for speed” to the next level, putting the actors in real F-18s to pull legit G-forces that you can see on their faces and practically feel through the screen. With the F-18 coming in both single and dual-pilot configurations, the production could stick the actors in the backseat and film them as if they were flying the single-seat version.

The earnestness of the filmmaking and cinematography gives the film an unmatched level of verisimilitude that makes it effortless to enjoy — despite what seems to be a cottage industry of former fighter pilots popping up on YouTube to analyze the technical inaccuracies of the film.

Subscribe HERE to the FREE Media Play News Daily Newsletter!

The key question of the film is, as an aging pilot, where does Maverick belong? To many film fans, the answer to that question isn’t just that he belongs in the air, but in the cockpit of an F-14 Tomcat, which is perhaps the most iconic fighter plane of all time thanks in no small part to being featured in 1980s films such as Top Gun.

Being well aware of this, it’s a good bet the filmmakers will find a way for Maverick to find his way back to the F-14. And when they do, it’s a pure hit of that sweet sugar we all crave.

The filmmakers know exactly what they’re doing, taking full advantage of basic screenwriting lessons of setup and payoff. This is a screenplay that tells you exactly where it’s going, and it’s a ride you want to take.

Follow us on Instagram!

The 4K presentation of Top Gun: Maverick is simply stunning, with reference-quality visuals and sound that should really push the boundaries of what home theaters can do. The HD presentation features a shifting aspect ratio, expanding to fill the screen during the aerial scenes to take advantage of the Imax photography used during production.

The film is offered in standalone 4K, Blu-ray and DVD editions — frustratingly, none of the wide releases are combo packs, aside from a code to access a digital copy being included with the 4K and Blu-ray sets. There is a limited-edition Steelbook with both 4K and Blu-ray included. A gift set of both films on both 4K and Blu-ray is due Dec. 6.

Only the Blu-ray editions include bonus materials, which are also accessible through the digital copy at some retailers.

These include several insightful behind-the-scenes featurettes. The eight-minute “Breaking New Ground” delves into the challenges of finding the techniques to make the film as realistic as possible, including creating new cameras for the cockpits; the nine-minute “Cleared for Take Off” invites viewers into the training the actors received to film the aerial sequences; the five-minute “A Love Letter to Aviation” deals with Cruise’s passion for flying and how he piloted his own World War II-era P-51 Mustang plane in the film; and the seven-and-a-half-minute “Forging the Darkstar” looks at the filming of the fictional plane prototype in the opening sequence, for which the the Lockheed Martin Skunk Works development team was brought in to lend an air of authenticity.

Also included are music videos for the songs “Hold My Hand” by Lady Gaga (the new love theme that in tandem with the original film’s theme serves as the basis for the new film’s musical score), and “I Ain’t Worried” by Onerepublic (the song that accompanies the beach football scene that is this film’s version of the original’s volleyball scene).

Exclusive to the 4K disc (and digitally) is “Masterclass With Tom Cruise,” a terrific 50-minute discussion with Cruise at the Cannes Film Festival about his career.

Among the extras available digitally are a 26-minute promotional video of comedian James Corden going through pilot training with Cruise. There’s also a short video from CinemaCon of Cruise introducing a screening of Top Gun: Maverick while filming an aerial stunt for the upcoming Mission: Impossible — Dead Reckoning Part One, a trailer for which also is included.

The Final Countdown

4K ULTRA HD BLU-RAY REVIEW:

Street Date 5/25/21;
Blue Underground;
Sci-Fi Action;
$59.95 UHD BD;
Rated ‘PG.’
Stars Kirk Douglas, Martin Sheen, James Farentino, Katherine Ross, Charles Durning, Ron O’Neal.

The premise of The Final Countdown teases an irresistible bit of speculative fiction: What if a single modern U.S. aircraft carrier was available to defend Pearl Harbor against the Japanese fleet?

While modern in this scenario refers to 1980, when the movie first came out, and military tech has evolved a bit since then, those advancements aren’t as much of a radical change as the difference between pre-World War II hardware and what was available during filming. In fact, the aircraft carrier at the center of the story, the U.S.S. Nimitz, is still in service as of 2021.

To put the time gap into perspective, it would be the temporal equivalent of a newer carrier such as the U.S.S. Ronald Reagan going back in time from now to 1982, when Reagan was actually president. But the foundational shift from analog to digital makes the 1980s to today feel much closer than the 1940s feels to the ’80s. Which is all a way of saying the central hook of the story still holds up as an intriguing plot twist more than 40 years later.

Despite a plot involving time travel and naval warfare, The Final Countdown really isn’t that complicated of a movie. In essence, the aircraft carrier Nimitz, while engaged in training exercises, encounters a rift in space-time that sends it back to 1941. The crew investigates their situation, figures out what happened, and decides that no matter the time, their duty is to defend the United States, so they prepare to ambush the Japanese fleet with modern jet fighters before it can attack Pearl Harbor.

The primary fun in the film is watching the characters try to grasp the implications of the premise. The main debate is between the ship’s captain, played by Kirk Douglas, who must decide what the crew’s duty is despite being displaced by time, and a civilian observer played by Martin Sheen, who wonders if it’s possible to change history, and if so, what the ramifications would be. James Farentino plays the ship’s air wing commander, who also happens to be an amateur historian and expert on the Pearl Harbor attack.

The captain’s assessments hit a bit of a wrinkle when a fighter patrol encounters a couple of Japanese scout planes firing on a yacht in order to wipe out any potential witnesses. The boat’s main passenger turns out to be a U.S. senator (played Charles Durning) who could have become president had history not recorded him having disappeared just before the Pearl Harbor attack. Instead, he’s very much alive and sitting in the infirmary of a ship decades more advanced than the technology he’s familiar with, and he has a lot of questions.

Follow us on Instagram

Aside from its place in time travel lore, the film is also mostly known for its authentic depiction of the operations on board a U.S. aircraft carrier, so much so that long stretches of the film are dedicated solely to depicting the processes for launching and maintaining fighter planes, which doesn’t do much to service the story but is catnip for military hardware junkies.

The reason for the authenticity is that the production crew was allowed to film on the actual U.S.S. Nimitz and record real military planes in action. In fact, some of the real naval aviators who worked on the film speculate in a bonus featurette that the Navy agreed to participate because they could use the final film as a recruitment video.

The primary fighter on display here is the F-14 Tomcat, six years before they were similarly featured in Top Gun. The appearance of the F-14 in both films is a primary reason the craft is among the greatest fighter planes from a pop culture perspective, and watching a couple of them dogfight with Japanese Zeros is a pure delight.

Subscribe HERE to the FREE Media Play News Daily Newsletter!

The Final Countdown has enjoyed a few notable home video releases before, arriving on DVD in 2004 and on Blu-ray in 2008. But Blue Underground’s new 4K edition is the ultimate edition of the film, offering a nice-looking new restoration from the original 35mm camera negative, plus all previously available bonus material and then some.

First up is a commentary track carried over from 2004 with the film’s cinematographer, Victor J. Kemper, who discusses the process of shooting the film on board an active aircraft carrier with Blue Underground representative David Gregory.

There are also two featurettes, also from 2004, both of which are upscaled to 4K. “Lloyd Kaufman Goes Hollywood” is a 14-minute interview with Kaufman, the legendary Troma Entertainment founder who worked as a producer on the film, while the 31-minute “Starring the Jolly Rogers” is a fascinating retrospective featuring some of the real pilots who flew the planes in the film.

There are also galleries for the film’s promotional artwork, trailers and TV spots, the latter narrated by the voice of Optimus Prime himself, Peter Cullen.

The 4K combo pack includes the film on both a 4K disc and a regular Blu-ray, and the extras are fully available on both. In addition, the set doesn’t just repack the old 2008 Blu-ray, but a newly engineered one using the same restoration of the film as the 4K disc.

The set also includes the D-Box motion control from the original Blu-ray, and the “Zero Pilot Journal” essay that was available as text on the DVD release has been reprinted as a physical booklet insert.

Another added treat is a CD soundtrack of the film’s musical score by John Scott. This is the same CD that is available on its own through Screen Archives, and consists of 23 tracks running 54 minutes total.

Rounding out the set is reversable box art and a slipcase with a lenticular cover depicting the Nimitz disappearing into the rift.

All in all, this is a must have for fans of the film, the U.S. Navy and time travel stories in general.