‘CODA’ Makes Oscar History as First Streaming Film to Win Best Picture

The lines between theatrical and home entertainment were blurred even further at the 94th Academy Awards when CODA became the first movie from a streaming service to win Best Picture.

The coming-of-age drama was released on Apple TV+ as well as theaters last August.  Written and directed by Sian Heder, the film is a remake of the 2014 French film La Famille Bélier. It stars Emilia Jones as a CODA (child of deaf adults), the only member of a deaf family who can hear, and follows her struggles to strike a balance between her own life and her family’s fishing business.

Troy Kotsur, one of several deaf cast members, won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor, while the film’s third win went to Heder for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Streaming already accounts for nearly 80% of all consumer spending on home entertainment, and CODA‘s win reflects the growing importance of non-theatrical distribution in a world still battling the COVID-19 pandemic. 

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The night’s other big winner was Dune, which was intended for theaters but due to the pandemic wound up premiering on both the big screen and HBO Max in October 2021. The Denis Villeneuve-helmed sci-fi remake won six Oscars, more than any other film, but mostly in technical categories: Best Cinematography, Best Film Editing, Best Production Design, Best Sound, Best Visual Effects, an Best Original Score for Hans Zimmer. A sequel is already in the works, tentatively slated for release in October 2023.

Among the major awards, Jane Campion won Best Director for The Power of the Dog, a Netflix film many observers felt was the frontrunner for Best Picture after leading all films with 12 nominations. It won just the single trophy.

Best Actor in a Leading Role went to Will Smith for King Richard, while Best Actress in a Leading Role went to Jessica Chastain for The Eyes of Tammy Faye, from Disney-owned Searchlight Pictures.

King Richard, about the father of tennis superstars Serena and Venus Williams, was released simultaneously to theaters and HBO Max in November 2021. The Eyes of Tammy Faye, about the flamboyant wife of televangelist and convicted fraudster Jim Bakker, also won Best Makeup and Hairstyling. The film was released theatrically in September and on Blu-ray Disc two months later. It became available for streaming on HBO Max in February 2022.

Ariana DeBose won Best Supporting Actress for West Side Story, Steven Spielberg’s remake of the 1957 Broadway musical about two rival New York City street gangs. The film was released theatrically in December 2021 and became available to stream on Disney+ and HBO Max on March 2. The film was released on DVD, Blu-ray Disc and 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray on March 15. DeBose won for playing Anita, the same role for which Rita Moreno won the same award for playing in the 1961 movie adaptation.

Smith won the top acting award shortly after he jumped up on stage and smacked presenter Chris Rock after Rock made a joke about Smith’s wife, actress Jada Pinkett Smith, who suffers from alopedia, an autoimmune disorder that causes your hair to fall out. During his presentation of the Best Documentary Feature award, Rock compared Pinkett Smith — who has shaved her head — to Demi Moore in 1997’s G.I. Jane, saying he can’t wait to see her in G.I. Jane 2. Pinkett Smith gave him a sour look, while Smith at first smiled, but seconds later bounded up on stage.

After the altercation, Smith returned to his seat but shouted, twice, “Keep my wife’s name out of your fucking mouth.”

Rock ultimately handed the Documentary Feature statuette to Summer of Soul, a documentary directed by Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson about the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival. The Searchlight Pictures release is available on DVD and to stream on Hulu. Best Documentary Short honors went to the 22-minute film The Queen of Basketball, about Lucy Harris, the first and only woman officially drafted into the NBA.

Among other major awards, Disney’s Encanto won Best Animated Feature. Best Original Screenplay honors went to Belfast, the British coming-of-age drama written and directed by Kenneth Branagh and released by Focus Features.

“No Time to Die,” from the James Bond movie of the same name, was hailed as Best Original Song. This marks the third win in a row for a Bond title song, following 2012’s Skyfall and 2015’s Spectre (“Writing’s on the Wall”). The Bond movie franchise, which received a 60th anniversary tribute from the Academy (since the debut of Dr. No in 1962), is known for its iconic musical themes, but scored no song Oscars for its first 50 years.

The year’s Best International Feature was pegged by Academy voters to be Drive My Car, a  Japanese road film that also made Oscar history this year by being the first Japanese film to be nominated for Best Picture.

Best Costume Design honors went to Disney’s Cruella, while The Windshield Wiper was named Best Animated Short and The Long Goodbye won Best Live Action Short honors.

‘Dune’ Knocks ‘Ghostbusters’ From Atop U.K. Home Entertainment Chart

Warner Bros. Home Entertainment’s Dune (2021) ended the three-week reign of Paramount Home Entertainment’s Ghostbusters: Afterlife at No. 1 on the Official Film Chart through Feb. 9, the U.K.’s weekly home entertainment retail sales chart.

Following its release on DVD and Blu-ray Disc, the latest adaptation of Dune climbed to the top with 83,000-unit sales, including 86% on disc.

Afterlife finished No. 2 on the chart, while a three-movie collection of Afterlife and the two 1980s “Ghostbusters” films was No. 7.

Meanwhile, MGM’s James Bond actioner No Time to Die (distributed by Universal Pictures Home Entertainment in the U.K.) held firm at No. 3, finishing ahead of Universal’s psychological horror Last Night in Soho, starring Thomasin McKenzie, Anya Taylor-Joy, Michael Ajao and Matt Smith, at No. 4.

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Disney’s ever-popular animated musical Encanto held on to No. 5, while Sony Pictures Home Entertainment’s Venom: Let There Be Carnage dropped two spots to No. 6.

At No. 8 was the week’s highest new entry, Sony Pictures’ Resident Evil: Welcome To Raccoon City. The reboot of the action-horror series, based on the classic video games, stars Kaya Scodelario. Finally, DreamWorks Animation’s The Boss Baby: Family Business dropped three spots to No. 9, while Universal’s Halloween Kills claimed a fifth week on the chart at No. 10.

The Official Film Chart Top 10 – Feb. 9, 2022

Rank Position Movie Distributor
1 2 DUNE WARNER
2 1 GHOSTBUSTERS: AFTERLIFE SONY PICTURES
3 3 NO TIME TO DIE UNIVERSAL/MGM
4 15 LAST NIGHT IN SOHO UNIVERSAL
5 5 ENCANTO DISNEY
6 4 VENOM: LET THERE BE CARNAGE SONY PICTURES
7 NEW GHOSTBUSTERS 3-MOVIE COLLECTION SONY PICTURES
8 NEW RESIDENT EVIL: WELCOME TO RACOON CITY SONY PICTURES
9 6 THE BOSS BABY: FAMILY BUSINESS UNIVERSAL/DREAMWORKS ANIMATION
10 7 HALLOWEEN KILLS UNIVERSAL

© Official Charts Company 2022

Arrow Video Announces February 2022 Slate of Streaming Titles

 Arrow Video has announced the February 2022 lineup of its new subscription-based Arrow streaming platform, available to subscribers in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and Ireland.

The slate is topped with David Buchanan’s surrealist black-and-white cyberpunk feature Laguna Ave, which debuted Feb. 1 with a host of exclusive extras. 

Other new releases that began streaming on that date include The Sleeper Must Awaken: Making Dune, a feature-length documentary exploring the making of David Lynch’s film, featuring dozens of new and archive interviews with the cast and crew of the 1984 cult classic; Avenging Angel, Spookies, Pledge Night, Blood Harvest, The House of the Dead, Demon Wind and Night Train to Terror.

Beginning Feb. 11, Arrow will  begin streaming a hand-picked slate of films from Gareth Evans, writer-director of The Raid and The Raid 2. The filmmaker’s selections, drawn from the Arrow vault, include A Snake of June, Dark Water, Versus, Audition and The Ballad of Narayama.

Other February streaming highlights include Dan Curtis’ Dracula, the 1974 TV movie adaptation from the creator of “Dark Shadows,” which begins streaming on Feb. 18.

And, beginning on Feb. 21, Arrow will stream two films available for North American subscribers only: Next of Kin, about a young woman who inherits a creaky retirement home and finds herself in a waking nightmare of murder, madness and a legacy of evil that may be inescapable, and Turkey Shoot, set in a totalitarian near future, where defiant citizens are labeled “deviants” and sentenced to brutal “behavior modification” camps. 

 

‘Dune’ Tops Disc Sales Charts for Third Week

The new adaptation of Dune from Warner Bros. Home Entertainment spent a third week at No. 1 on the NPD VideoScan First Alert chart, which tracks combined DVD and Blu-ray Disc unit sales, and the dedicated Blu-ray Disc sales chart the week ended Jan. 29.

Identified onscreen as Dune: Part One, the film is directed by Denis Villeneuve and covers roughly the first half of the 1965 Frank Herbert novel upon which it is based. Dune tells the story of factions in a galactic empire in the far future warring over a desert planet that houses valuable resources. It earned $107.5 million at the domestic box office.

MGM’s No Time to Die rose two spots on both charts to No. 2. The latest James Bond actioner is distributed on disc by Universal Pictures Home Entertainment and earned $160.8 million at the domestic box office and sold about 93% as many copies as the top seller.

Universal’s Halloween Kills dropped a spot to No. 3 on both charts. The sequel to 2018’s Halloween earned $92 million at the domestic box office.

MGM’s The Addams Family 2, distributed on disc by Universal Pictures Home Entertainment, slipped to No. 4 on the overall disc sales chart and No. 6 on the Blu-ray chart. The animated sequel to 2018’s The Addams Family earned $56.5 million at the domestic box office.

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The Marvel-inspired sequel Venom: Let There Be Carnage from Sony Pictures stayed No. 5 on the overall disc sales chart, and rose to No. 4 on the Blu-ray chart, in its seventh week on Blu-ray and DVD.

The No. 5 Blu-ray Disc seller was an older Marvel Comics adaptation, 2004’s The Punisher from Lionsgate. It was No. 7 on the overall disc chart, propelled upward due to an exclusive Best Buy 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Steelbook, as well as a relative lack of new titles during the week. The 2004 film based on the Marvel Comics vigilante character stars Thomas Jane as Frank Castle, who becomes The Punisher to seek revenge on the mafia boss (John Travolta) who murdered his family. The cast also includes Will Patton and Roy Scheider. The film was originally released on 4K in September 2018. For the week it had 99% of its unit sales come from Blu-ray Disc, with 91% from 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, 8% from regular Blu-ray, and less than 1% from legacy DVD.

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The Media Play News rental chart for the week ended Jan. 30 also had Dune in the top spot again. Addams Family 2 repeated at No. 2 on the rental chart.

Venom: Let There Be Carnage rose a spot to No. 3, pushing Halloween Kills down a spot to No. 4. No Time to Die rose a spot to No. 5.

Top 20 Sellers for Week Ended 1-29-22
Top 20 Rentals for Week Ended 1-30-22
Top 20 Selling Blu-ray Discs for Week Ended 1-29-22
Top 20 Blu-ray Market Share for Week Ended 1-29-22
Sales Report for Week Ended 1-29-22
Digital Transactions Snapshot for Week Ended 1-31-22

 

‘Dune’ Rises to No. 1 on Redbox On Demand Chart, Tops Disc Rentals for Third Week

Warner Bros. Home Entertainment’s Dune spent a third week at No. 1 on the Redbox disc rental chart the week ended Jan. 30, and also took over the top spot on the Redbox On Demand chart for the first time. From director Denis Villeneuve, the film is the latest adaptation of the 1965 Frank Herbert novel about factions of a galactic empire warring over the riches of a desert planet.

Sony Pictures’ Venom: Let There Be Carnage dropped to No. 2 on the Redbox On Demand chart after six weeks in the top spot, but rose a spot to No. 3 on the disc rental chart, which tracks DVD and Blu-ray Disc rentals at Redbox’s more than 40,000 red kiosks.

The No. 2 disc rental was MGM’s The Addams Family 2, distributed on disc by Universal Pictures Home Entertainment. The animated sequel slid three spots to No. 7 on the Redbox On Demand chart, which tracks digital VOD and sellthrough transactions. 

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Universal Pictures’ Halloween Kills was No. 4 on the disc chart and No. 6 on the digital chart.

MGM’s latest James Bond actioner, No Time to Die, was No. 5 on both charts. It is distributed on disc by Universal.

Paramount’s Clifford the Big Red Dog slid a spot to No. 3 on the digital chart, while Disney-owned 20th Century Studios’ Free Guy inched up a spot to No. 4.

Top DVD and Blu-ray Disc Rentals, Redbox Kiosks, Week Ended Jan. 30:

  1. Dune: Part One — Warner
  2. The Addams Family 2 — Universal/MGM
  3. Venom: Let There Be Carnage — Sony Pictures
  4. Halloween Kills — Universal
  5. No Time to Die — Universal/MGM
  6. Last Night in Soho — Universal
  7. Free Guy — Disney/20th Century
  8. American Siege — Redbox
  9. Antlers — Searchlight
  10. Red Stone — Cinedigm

 

Top Digital (VOD + Sellthrough), Redbox On Demand, Week Ended Jan. 30:

  1. Dune: Part One — Warner
  2. Venom: Let There Be Carnage — Sony Pictures
  3. Clifford the Big Red Dog — Paramount
  4. Free Guy — Disney/20th Century
  5. No Time to Die — MGM
  6. Halloween Kills — Universal
  7. The Addams Family 2 — MGM
  8. Ghostbusters: Afterlife — Sony Pictures
  9. F9: The Fast Saga — Universal
  10. Old — Universal

 

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‘Dune’ Maintains Top Spot on Disc Sales Charts

The new adaptation of Dune from Warner Bros. Home Entertainment spent a second week at No. 1 on the NPD VideoScan First Alert chart, which tracks combined DVD and Blu-ray Disc unit sales, and the dedicated Blu-ray Disc sales chart the week ended Jan. 22.

Identified onscreen as Dune: Part One, the film is directed by Denis Villeneuve and covers roughly the first half of the 1965 Frank Herbert novel upon which it is based. Dune tells the story of factions in a galactic empire in the far future warring over a desert planet that houses valuable resources. It earned $107.5 million at the domestic box office.

The No. 2 seller on both charts for a second week was Universal Pictures Home Entertainment’s Halloween Kills, the sequel to 2018’s Halloween, which itself was a sequel to the 1978 film of the same name and rebooted the franchise by ignoring all previous sequels. It earned $92 million at the domestic box office and sold about 53% as many copies as Dune during the week.

The week’s top newcomer on the overall disc sales chart, at No. 3, was MGM’s The Addams Family 2, distributed on disc by Universal Pictures Home Entertainment. The animated sequel to 2018’s The Addams Family earned $56.5 million at the domestic box office. It was No. 5 on the Blu-ray Disc chart.

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The No. 3 Blu-ray was another newcomer, Last Night in Soho, a psychological horror film from director Edgar Wright. It was No. 6 on the overall disc sales chart after earning $10.1 million at U.S. theaters.

MGM’s No Time to Die slipped one spot to No. 4 on both charts. The latest James Bond actioner is distributed on disc by Universal Pictures.

The Marvel-inspired sequel Venom: Let There Be Carnage from Sony Pictures slipped to No. 5 on the overall disc sales chart, and No. 6 on the Blu-ray chart, in its sixth week on Blu-ray and DVD.

Blu-ray Disc formats accounted for 49% of first-week Addams Family 2 unit sales; it wasn’t released on 4K disc. Last Night in Soho had 81% of its first-week sales come from Blu-ray Disc, with 35% from the 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray and 46% from the regular Blu-ray.

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The Media Play News rental chart for the week ended Jan. 23 also had Dune in the top spot again. Addams Family 2 debuted at No. 2 on the rental chart.

Halloween Kills slipped a spot to No. 3, pushing Venom: Let There Be Carnage to No. 4. Last Night in Soho debuted at No. 5.

Top 20 Sellers for Week Ended 1-22-22
Top 20 Rentals for Week Ended 1-23-22
Top 20 Selling Blu-ray Discs for Week Ended 1-22-22
Top 20 Blu-ray Market Share for Week Ended 1-22-22
Sales Report for Week Ended 1-22-22
Digital Transactions Snapshot for Week Ended 1-24-22

 

‘Dune,’ ‘Venom’ Keep Top Spots on Redbox Charts

Warner Bros. Home Entertainment’s Dune remained No. 1 on the Redbox disc rental chart the week ended Jan. 23. From director Denis Villeneuve, the film is the latest adaptation of the 1965 Frank Herbert novel about factions of a galactic empire warring over the riches of a desert planet.

Sony Pictures’ Venom: Let There Be Carnage stayed No. 1 on the Redbox On Demand chart for a sixth week, but slipped to No. 4 on the disc rental chart, which tracks DVD and Blu-ray Disc rentals at Redbox’s more than 40,000 red kiosks.

The No. 2 disc rental was MGM’s The Addams Family 2, distributed on disc by Universal Pictures Home Entertainment. The animated film, a sequel to 2019’s The Addams Family and based on the classic kooky and spooky comic strip characters, earned $56.5 million at the domestic box office. It was No. 4 on the Redbox On Demand chart, which tracks digital VOD and sellthrough transactions. 

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Universal Pictures’ Halloween Kills was No. 3 on both charts.

Paramount’s Clifford the Big Red Dog remained No. 2 on the digital chart, while Disney-owned 20th Century Studios’ Free Guy took No. 5.

Rounding out the top five disc rentals was the newly released Universal Pictures’ Last Night in Soho, a thriller from director Edgar Wright that earned $10.1 million from U.S. theaters.

Top DVD and Blu-ray Disc Rentals, Redbox Kiosks, Week Ended Jan. 23:

  1. Dune: Part One — Warner
  2. The Addams Family 2 — Universal/MGM
  3. Halloween Kills — Universal
  4. Venom: Let There Be Carnage — Sony Pictures
  5. Last Night in Soho — Universal
  6. No Time to Die — Universal/MGM
  7. Free Guy — Disney/20th Century
  8. Antlers — Searchlight
  9. American Siege — Redbox
  10. Red Stone — Cinedigm

 

Top Digital (VOD + Sellthrough), Redbox On Demand, Week Ended Jan. 23:

  1. Venom: Let There Be Carnage — Sony Pictures
  2. Clifford the Big Red Dog — Paramount
  3. Halloween Kills — Universal
  4. The Addams Family 2 — MGM
  5. Free Guy — Disney/20th Century
  6. Ghostbusters: Afterlife — Sony Pictures
  7. Sing 2 — Universal
  8. No Time to Die — MGM
  9. Antlers — Searchlight
  10. Dangerous — Lionsgate

 

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‘Dune,’ ‘Halloween Kills’ Debut Atop Disc Sales Charts

The new adaptation of Dune from Warner Bros. Home Entertainment debuted at No. 1 on the NPD VideoScan First Alert chart, which tracks combined DVD and Blu-ray Disc unit sales, and the dedicated Blu-ray Disc sales chart the week ended Jan. 15.

Identified onscreen as Dune: Part One, the film is directed by Denis Villeneuve and covers roughly the first half of the 1965 Frank Herbert novel upon which it is based. Dune tells the story of factions in a galactic empire in the far future warring over a desert planet that houses valuable resources. It earned $107.4 million at the domestic box office.

The No. 2 seller on both charts was another newcomer, Universal Pictures Home Entertainment’s Halloween Kills, the sequel to 2018’s Halloween, which itself was a sequel to the 1978 film of the same name and rebooted the franchise by ignoring all previous sequels. It earned $92 million at the domestic box office and sold about 57% as many copies as Dune.

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The top seller the previous three weeks, MGM’s No Time to Die, slipped to No. 3 on both charts. The latest James Bond actioner is distributed on disc by Universal Pictures.

The Marvel-inspired sequel Venom: Let There Be Carnage from Sony Pictures slipped to No. 4 on both charts in its fifth week on Blu-ray and DVD.

No. 5 on both charts was Disney-owned Marvel Studios’ Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings, the 25th film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe franchise.

Other newcomers to debut in the top 20 include, at No. 6, Sony Pictures’ Cobra Kai: Season 3, a disc release of the third season of the Netflix series continuation of the “Karate Kid” franchise. No. 14 on the overall disc sales chart (No. 11 on the Blu-ray chart) was Decal’s Spencer, a drama depicting a fictionalized account of Princess Diana’s 1991 Christmas visit to the royal family that spurred her to seek a separation from them, starring Kristen Stewart as Di.

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Blu-ray Disc formats accounted for 81% of first-week Dune unit sales, with 39% from the 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, 2% from a 3D Blu-ray edition, and 40% from the regular Blu-ray. For Halloween Kills, Blu-ray accounted for 67% of its tally, 40% from regular Blu-ray and 27% from 4K. Spencer had 51% of its sales come from the HD format (it was not released on 4K disc).

The Media Play News rental chart for the week ended Jan. 16 also had Dune in the top spot and Halloween Kills at No. 2.

The previous week’s top rental, Venom: Let There Be Carnage, slipped to No. 3, followed by No Time to Die at No. 4.

Disney-owned Searchlight Pictures’ horror film Antlers entered the rental chart at No. 5 after being delayed a week at Redbox rental kiosks.

Top 20 Sellers for Week Ended 1-15-22
Top 20 Rentals for Week Ended 1-16-22
Top 20 Selling Blu-ray Discs for Week Ended 1-15-22
Top 20 Blu-ray Market Share for Week Ended 1-15-22
Sales Report for Week Ended 1-15-22
Digital Transactions Snapshot for Week Ended 1-17-22

‘Dune’ Takes Over Top Spot on Redbox Disc Rental Chart

Warner Bros. Home Entertainment’s Dune debuted at No. 1 on the Redbox disc rental chart the week ended Jan. 16.

From director Denis Villeneuve, the film is the latest adaptation of the 1965 Frank Herbert novel about factions of a galactic empire warring over the riches of a desert planet. It earned $107.4 million at the domestic box office.

The previous week’s top disc rental, Sony Pictures’ Venom: Let There Be Carnage, slipped to No. 3 on the disc rental chart, but stayed No. 1 on the Redbox On Demand chart for a fifth week.

The newly released Halloween Kills, from Universal Pictures, debuted at No. 2 on the Redbox disc rental chart, which tracks DVD and Blu-ray Disc rentals at Redbox’s more than 40,000 red kiosks, and was No. 3 on the on the Redbox On Demand chart, which tracks digital VOD and sellthrough transactions. 

The No. 2 digital title was Paramount’s Clifford the Big Red Dog, an adaptation of the children’s book series about a little girl whose best friend is a giant red dog.

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MGM’s No Time to Die, distributed on disc by Universal Pictures Home Entertainment, was No. 4 on the disc chart and No. 7 on the digital chart.

No. 5 on the disc rental chart and No. 6 on the On Demand chart was the horror film Antlers from Disney-owned Searchlight Pictures.

The No. 4 digital title was Sing 2, an animated sequel from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment. No. 5 on the digital chart was was Sony Pictures’ Ghostbusters: Afterlife.

Top DVD and Blu-ray Disc Rentals, Redbox Kiosks, Week Ended Jan. 16:

  1. Dune: Part One — Warner
  2. Halloween Kills — Universal
  3. Venom: Let There Be Carnage — Sony Pictures
  4. No Time to Die — Universal/MGM
  5. Antlers — Searchlight
  6. Free Guy — Disney/20th Century
  7. American Siege — Redbox
  8. The Last Duel — 20th Century
  9. Dangerous — Lionsgate
  10. Cry Macho — Warner

 

Top Digital (VOD + Sellthrough), Redbox On Demand, Week Ended Jan. 16:

  1. Venom: Let There Be Carnage — Sony Pictures
  2. Clifford the Big Red Dog — Paramount
  3. Halloween Kills — Universal
  4. Sing 2 — Universal
  5. Ghostbusters: Afterlife — Sony Pictures
  6. Antlers — Searchlight
  7. No Time to Die — MGM
  8. Free Guy — Disney/20th Century
  9. Dangerous — Lionsgate
  10. F9: The Fast Saga — Universal

 

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Dune: Part One

4K ULTRA HD BLU-RAY REVIEW:

Warner;
Sci-Fi;
Box Office $107.35 million;
$34.98 DVD, $39.98 Blu-ray, $49.98 UHD BD;
Rated ‘PG-13’ for sequences of strong violence, some disturbing images and suggestive material.
Stars Timothée Chalamet, Rebecca Ferguson, Oscar Isaac, Josh Brolin, Stellan Skarsgård, Dave Bautista, Stephen McKinley Henderson, Zendaya, Chang Chen, Sharon Duncan-Brewster, Charlotte Rampling, Jason Momoa, Javier Bardem.

Efforts to adapt Frank Herbert’s landmark 1965 sci-fi novel Dune have been met with mixed results over the years.

The 1970s saw Alejandro Jodorowsky envision a 10-hour movie version, and when that fell through, producer Dino De Laurentiis grabbed the rights and hired Ridley Scott to give it a go as a follow-up to Alien, though the scope of the project proved too daunting for him as well.

Then David Lynch came on board, choosing to adapt Dune over, among other projects, directing Return of the Jedi. His version finally arrived in 1984 after a troubled production and massive edits to bring his three-hour initial cut to a bit over two hours for the theatrical release, a running time that so crammed Herbert’s story that it was generally panned by critics for being incomprehensible.

The Sci-Fi Channel in the early 2000s had a bit better luck with a pair of miniseries based on Dune and a few of Herbert’s sequels to it, earning ratings success while leaving fans of the books to continue to clamor for a worthy big-screen version.

Director Denis Villeneuve’s interpretation seems to have met those aspirations.

Villeneuve’s Dune presents the narrative as a sweeping epic of galactic politics and feuding families, marked by stunning visual splendor and scope.

Covering roughly half of the first book, Dune: Part One, as it is announced on screen, tells the story of a desert world named Arrakis, thousands of years into the future when humanity has colonized the vast expanses of outer space and formed an empire to control it, led by wealthy and influential families. The planet’s sands provide the only known source of the spice Melange, a substance with mind-altering properties that makes celestial navigation possible.

The Emperor has ordered the House Atreides, led by Duke Leto (Oscar Isaac) to take over administration of Arrakis from Baron Harkonnen (Stellan Skarsgård). Leto’s son, Paul (Timothée Chalamet), begins having visions of living among the Fremen, remnants of the tribes that originally inhabited the planet.

The Fremen are experts at surviving the harsh desert environment and dealing with the giant native sandworms that roam beneath the surface, both depositing the spice and menacing the efforts to extract it. Paul is rumored to be a prophesized messiah to the Fremen.

The Atreides will not have an easy time of it on Arrakis, however, as it quickly becomes apparent that their appointment to govern the planet is a trap by the Emperor and the Harkonnens to diminish their power, if not eliminate them altogether by a full-scale assault on the planet.

Villeneuve places the emphasis on the human and character aspects of the story, rather than the more bizarre sci-fi elements that seemed to fuel Lynch’s version.

At around two-and-a-half-hours, he also takes 20 more minutes than Lynch to tell half the story, allowing it to breathe by not trying to cram the density of the first book into a single movie, as the 1984 version did.

To make sure viewers who didn’t read the book are not left completely baffled, long early stretches of the film are very heavy in exposition, explaining who the families are, the Fremen and the culture of Arrakis. But this is all necessary worldbuilding endemic to any good sci-fi franchise and should continue to pay off with future installments.

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Savvy viewers may have noticed the influence the original novel had on countless burgeoning sci-fi franchises in the years it took to get a movie adaptation off the ground, with “Star Wars” and its desert world of Tatooine being the most notable example. Because of this, some fans might find a lot of similarities between this latest Dune movie and some recent “Star Wars” shows set on Tatooine, such as “The Mandalorian” and “The Book of Boba Fett.”

The exposition provided in the film is expanded upon in the Blu-ray bonus materials, with an eight minute featurette about the Royal Houses, and 10-and-a-half-minutes of video encyclopedia entries similar to the ones Paul watches in the film in order to learn about Arrakis.

The Blu-ray also includes nearly an hour of behind-the-scenes featurettes as well, with individual videos focused on the usual things like production design, cinematography, costumes and visual effects

Some dig deeper, such as a creating the makeup effects used to create the Baron’s bloated physique. Another looks at the fighting styles used to give the battle scenes a heightened since of verisimilitude. Others show how the visual effects team pulled off the film’s unique vehicles, as well as the giant worm attacks; the longest is an 11-minute examination of the film’s distinctive sound design and Hans Zimmer’s musical score.

Collectively, they demonstrate the precision and craftsmanship that went into constructing the film.