‘Star Trek’ Documentary ‘What We Left Behind’ Available on Disc Aug. 6

The documentary What We Left Behind: Looking Back at ‘Star Trek: Deep Space Nine’ will arrive on Blu-ray, DVD and digitally Aug. 6 from Shout! Factory.

The film, which was financed through an Indiegogo campaign, examines the third live-action “Star Trek” series, “Deep Space Nine,” which ran from 1993 to 1999 and stood out among the franchise as the only show set on a space station as opposed to a ship of exploration.

Series showrunner Ira Steven Behr co-directs with David Zappone and interviews cast members and behind-the-scenes crew to get their memories of making the show and insights about its legacy.

Behr also brings back some of the show’s original writers to imagine what a new episode of the show would look like 20 years after the series ended.

In addition, clips from the series have been remastered in high-definition for the first time.

Subscribe HERE to the FREE Media Play News Daily Newsletter!

The Blu-ray will include a roundtable discussion with the filmmakers and additional extras.

ShoutFactory.com is offering an exclusive special edition of the Blu-ray, limited to 1,500 copies, which will have a special second Blu-ray disc containing even more bonus material. The $29.95 limited edition can be preordered here.

Apollo 11

BLU-RAY REVIEW: 

Street Date 5/14/19;
Universal;
Documentary;
Box Office $8.56 million;
$22.98 DVD, $34.98 Blu-ray;
Rated ‘G.’

In preparing this 50th anniversary retrospective of the first moon landing, director Todd Douglas Miller and his team uncovered troves of previously unreleased film from the NASA archives.

Much of the footage was in 70mm, making the project a natural fit for an Imax presentation. And while the impact of the large-format screen is undeniable, the high-definition re-creation of the historic mission is just as stunning in a home-viewing setting.

According to the three-minute behind-the-scenes featurette included on the Blu-ray, this well-preserved footage was scanned at 8K and 16K using brand new equipment to remaster it at the highest resolutions yet possible.

The 93-minute documentary lets the footage itself tell the story of the Apollo 11 mission in July 1969, using no narration or retrospective interviews. Exposition is similarly handled through whatever someone might have said to explain it at the time, primarily through the audio feeds of the technicians and astronauts, or newscasts from famous voices such as Walter Cronkite.

Miller does provide bits of animation to demonstrate key mission details, as well as on-screen graphics denoting mission times and spacecraft speeds when such information would be most pertinent to understanding what is going on.

The clarity of the newly found footage really puts the audience in the moment, be it at mission control, at the launch pad or among the millions of onlookers camped out along the Florida coast to get a glimpse of the massive Saturn V rocket blasting into space.

The film is as much a tribute to the men and women working at all levels of the space program to put a man on the moon, giving audiences a view beyond the grandeur, at all-too-human moments that seem like almost a footnote today, and details that even many space enthusiasts may be surprised by.

For example, as the world focused on astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins heading to the launch pad, technicians were working to fix a leak in one of the rocket’s engines, just a few hours before lift-off.

Then, a few days into the mission, we’re reminded that the Apollo missions weren’t the only source of major news in the world, as we overhear some NASA engineers discussing the Chappaquiddick incident, when Teddy Kennedy drove his car off a bridge and left his female passenger to drown. That happened two days after Apollo 11 launched.

Subscribe HERE to the FREE Media Play News Daily Newsletter!

The documentary also enlightens us with some otherwise mundane information, such as the heart rates of the astronauts during the more stressful phases of the mission — Armstrong’s pulse during the lunar landing passed 150 beats per minute — that continues to ground the events in a common humanity.

There’s also some lip service to the cosmic radiation the astronauts would have been exposed to — often brought up by conspiracy theorists who don’t believe humans could survive long durations in space. The truth is, passing through the Van Allen radiation belt surrounding Earth, the speed of the Apollo capsule would have been sufficient enough so that its occupants would have absorbed a radiation dose equivalent to a typical X-ray scan.

Aside from the spectacular launch footage, another highlight of the film is the presentation of the landing sequence in real time, using mission audio synced to camera footage taken from a camera mounted on the lunar module during its descent.

Rounding out the documentary is a mixture of still photographs and archival footage from a variety of sources, some familiar and some offering new perspectives on known events.

For fans of the space program, history buffs in general, or just plain people who could use a reminder of the technological achievements man is capable of, Apollo 11 is a documentary that should not be missed.

Apollo 11

Imax Documentary ‘Pandas’ Arrives on Digital April 9 From Warner

Warner Bros. Home Entertainment will release the nature documentary Pandas through digital retailers and Movies Anywhere April 9.

The film, shot for Imax screens by David Douglas and Drew Fellman, the filmmakers behind Born to be Wild and Island of Lemurs: Madagascar, focuses on efforts by China’s Chengdu Research Base for Giant Panda Breeding to prepare captive-born cubs for release in the wild.

Subscribe HERE to our FREE daily newsletter!

The film, which is narrated by Kristen Bell, will be available April 16 through cable and satellite video on demand services and on select gaming consoles.

Netflix Acquires Sundance Award Winning Political Doc ‘Knock Down the House’

Netflix has acquired worldwide distribution rights to the Sundance Audience Award-winning documentary Knock Down the House, which chronicles the campaigns of four female progressive candidates, including Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, against powerful incumbents in the 2018 midterm elections.

The Sundance Institute also announced Knock Down the House as the winner of the Festival Favorite Award, selected by audience votes from the 121 features screened at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival.

The film, directed by Rachel Lears and produced by Lears, Robin Blotnick, and Sarah Olson, also features Amy Vilela, Cori Bush and Paula Jean Swearengin.

When tragedy struck her family in the midst of the financial crisis, Bronx-born Ocasio-Cortez had to work double shifts in a restaurant to save her home from foreclosure. After losing a loved one to a preventable medical condition, Amy Vilela didn’t know what to do with the anger she felt about America’s broken health care system. Cori Bush was drawn into the streets when the police shooting of an unarmed black man brought protests and tanks into her neighborhood. Paula Jean Swearengin was fed up with watching her friends and family suffer and die from the environmental effects of the coal industry. At a moment of historic volatility in American politics, Knock Down the House follows these four women as they decide to fight back despite having no political experience.

“We are thrilled to be partnering with Netflix on the release of Knock Down the House,” said director Lears, who also co-wrote the film in addition to producing, in a statement. “This platform will allow us to reach huge audiences worldwide, including viewers who may not usually watch independent documentaries. We’re also very excited to be working with Netflix on a campaign to spark wider cultural conversations about our democracy and how it can continue to evolve.”

“It is a transcendent moment when skilled filmmakers are able to train their lens on a major transformation,” said Lisa Nishimura, VP of Original Documentaries for Netflix, in a statement. “With intimacy and immediacy, Rachel Lears and Robin Blotnik, bring viewers to the front lines of a movement, as four women find their voice, their power and their purpose, allowing all of us to witness the promise of true democracy in action.”

Netflix Inks Deal With ‘Blue Planet II’ Creator

Netflix has signed a multiyear overall deal with James Honeyborne, creator and executive producer of the award-winning documentary series “Blue Planet II,” to produce new nature and science series.

“James has created some of the most captivating natural history series of our time, with breathtaking sweep and vision,” Lisa Nishimura, VP of documentaries and comedy at Netflix, said in a statement. “I am thrilled that he will be working with us at Netflix, bringing his unique exploration of the wonders of the natural world to our viewers.”

Honeyborne and partner Renee Godfrey will make all their productions through their company Freeborne Media Ltd.

“Freeborne is excited to be working with Netflix and for the new creative opportunities that will arise from our partnership,” Honeyborne said in a statement. “Today, wildlife and wild places are facing unprecedented challenges. There is a pressing need to tell important, surprising and inspiring stories about our world. Working with Netflix means we can create game-changing documentaries that can reach and engage a huge global audience.”

Honeyborne’s BBC work includes the BAFTA-winning “Big Blue Live” and the Emmy-nominated series “Wild New Zealand.” He was also the series producer of “Africa.” Honeyborne, who trained as a biologist, has overseen some 35 films during his time as an executive producer at the BBC’s Natural History Unit.

Godfrey trained as an anthropologist before working on the acclaimed series “Tribe” and “Human Planet.” Her recent credits include “Enchanted Kingdom 3D,” “Wild Atlantic” and “Wild New Zealand.”

Freeborne will be based in Bristol, England.

‘American Masters’ Documentary ‘Sammy Davis, Jr.: I’ve Gotta Be Me’ Due on Digital and DVD Feb. 19 From PBS

The “American Masters” program Sammy Davis, Jr.: I’ve Gotta Be Me is coming out on DVD and digital Feb. 19 from PBS Distribution.

This is the first major film documentary to examine the performer’s vast career and his journey for identity through the shifting tides of civil rights and racial progress during 20th century America, according to PBS. Davis strove to achieve the American Dream in a time of racial prejudice and shifting political territory. He was a veteran of increasingly outdated show business traditions and worked tirelessly to stay relevant, even as he frequently found himself bracketed by the bigotry of white America and the distaste of black America. Davis was a public black figure who embraces Judaism, thereby yoking his identity to that of another persecuted minority. In Duke Ellington’s words, he was “beyond category.”

The documentary features interviews with Billy Crystal, Norman Lear, Jerry Lewis, Whoopi Goldberg and Kim Novak, with never-before-seen photographs from Davis’ vast personal collection and footage of his performances.

‘Frontline’ Series ‘Documenting Hate, ‘American Experience: The Swamp’ Due on Digital and DVD Feb. 12 From PBS

PBS Distribution is releasing two documentaries, Frontline: Documenting Hate and American Experience: The Swamp, on digital and DVD Feb. 12.

Frontline: Documenting Hate is a two-part investigation into today’s white supremacy groups in the United States. In the first part, “Charlottesville,” correspondent A.C. Thompson tracks down some of those at the center of the infamous and deadly rally in Charlottesville, Va., revealing that one participant in the violence was an active-duty Marine, and the other worked for a major defense contractor and held a U.S. government security clearance. This part also shows just how ill-prepared law enforcement was to handle an influx of white supremacists from across the country, some of whom had been part of a series of earlier violent confrontations in California and descended on Charlottesville specifically to fight. The second part, “New American Nazis,” presents a new investigation into white supremacist groups in America, in particular a neo-Nazi group, Atomwaffen Division, that has actively recruited inside the U.S. Military. This joint investigation documents the group’s terrorist objectives, examines how civilian and military authorities have responded, and shows how the group gained strength after the 2017 Charlottesville rally.

Also due on digital and DVD Feb. 12 is American Experience: The Swamp. Told through the eccentric lives of hucksters, politicians and activists, the documentary explores the Florida Everglades, which has some of natures’ most mysterious and unique ecosystems. The program is based, in part, on the book The Swamp: The Everglades, Florida and the Politics of Paradise by Michael Grunwald.

Two ‘Nature’ Programs Coming to DVD and Digital in January From PBS

Two new “Nature” programs are coming in January on DVD and digital from PBS Distribution: A Squirrel’s Guide to Success, due Jan. 22, and Dogs in the Land of Lions, coming Jan. 29.

The squirrel family is one of the most widespread on Earth. There are almost 300 species of squirrel, those that can glide through the air, outwit rattlesnakes, and survive the coldest temperatures of any mammal. In A Squirrel’s Guide to Success, viewers learn about the extraordinary abilities and secrets to success of these nut lovers. Some of the species featured include the fox squirrel, which can remember the location of 9,000 nuts; the gray squirrel, whose jumps are the basis for new designs in robotics, and the Arctic ground squirrel, who, to survive the frigid winters of Alaska, hibernates by dropping its heart rate, breathing and body temperature.

Filmed over two-years, Dogs in the Land of Lions takes viewers into the heart of an African wild dog family, led by a mother called Puzzles. When her mate Jigsaw is suddenly killed by lions, she is suddenly left to raise two generations of pups on her own and without the help of a pack. Wild dogs have a willingness to sacrifice almost anything for their pack, a behavior wired into their DNA.

Roy Rogers Westerns, Faith-Based Documentaries and Dramas Among Titles on the March Disc Slate From Mill Creek

There’s something for every taste — Westerns, documentaries, and drama, family and action films — on the March disc release slate from Mill Creek Entertainment.

Coming on DVD March 5 is the drama If You’re Gone. When high school senior Brad Lee disappears the night of his graduation ceremony, his girlfriend is forced to question everything she thought she knew about him and their relationship, as well as her own faith, in hopes of finding him. The film stars Brittany Goodwin, Masey McLain, Desiree Ross and Ben Davies.

The Last Appeal, due on DVD March 5, is a faith-based drama set in the world of death row, where prisoners face legal battles, family struggles and mortality. Titus Freeman enters this daunting world determined to work the legal system to escape his sentence but discovers a new life beyond the grave. Meanwhile, his victim’s wife Trisha works the legal system to enforce his execution.

In the action film To Be a Soldier, also on DVD March 5, the sister of a mild-mannered British salesman goes missing in the Middle East, and he recruits an ex-Army ranger to help him rescue her. As they trek through the war-torn wilderness, they battle terrorists, the elements and their own dark human natures.

For the family audience March 5 is the DVD Guard Dog. Chance Watson is a lying, cheating, stealing 9-year-old who is flunking out of school. Then, one night, a magical sheepdog appears and promises to make his dreams come true, if he can follow “The Rules.” Soon, with the help of his talking, sometimes invisible dog, Chance has changed his life and the lives of many of the students at his school.

On tap March 12 are three Western collections on disc and digital.

Roy Rogers — The Happy Trails Collection, on DVD and digital, features 20 movies and is authorized by the Roy Rogers Estate. Each movie is introduced by Roy and Dale Evans in a special feature, “Happy Trails Theater.” They are joined by a host Western stars, including Gene Autry, Iron Eyes Cody, Pat Brady, Ruth Terry, Roy “Dusty” Rogers Jr. and Pat Butram.

The four-film Outlaws and Con Men collection, in DVD and digital, features Django Shoots First, starring Glenn Saxson, Fernando Sancho and Evelyn Stewart; Django’s Cut Price Corpses, with Jeff Cameron, John Desmont and Esmeralda Barros; Bad Man’s River, starring Lee Van Cleef, James Mason and Gina Lollobrigidal; and Sting of the West, with Jack Palance and Giancarlo Prete

On Blu-ray and digital March 12 is the Westerm double feature Fort Yuma Gold/Damned Hot Day of Fire. In Fort Yuma Gold, after the end of the Civil War, the fanatic Southern Major Sanders continues to fight and plans to attack Fort Yuma, home to a gold reserve. A captured Confederate soldier agrees to lead Union solders to stop Sanders, but their real mission and the charms of the beautiful Connie Breastfull complicate the situation. In Damned Hot Day of Fire, the creator of the Gatling gun, which his famous invention, has been kidnapped and is being held from the Union for a million dollar ransom. Captain Chris Tanner must find and stop the villainous Tarpas before he falls into the hands of the Confederates.

Also due March 12 is the drama Unbridled on DVD and digital. Sarah thinks she is beyond redemption and unworthy of love and is sent away from the house that defined her horrors to a place where she is not the only victim, or the only one fighting to get her life back, a ranch called Unbridled. At Unbridled, Sarah meets Dreamer, a horse who has also suffered abuse, a horse who no longer trusts humans — until he meets Sarah.

The drama double feature Footprints/Friends for Live is coming March 12 on Blu-ray, DVD and digital (combo). Footprints is based on the true story of a man who finds the healing power of love only after he loses everything, a dog who learns to trust and serve after being abused and discarded, and a journey the two of them take. In Friends for Life, big city attorney Jim Crawford had won most of the battles in his life, but he couldn’t win the battle against his wife’s illness. An unexpected twist of fate leads Jim to discover four orphaned wolf pups who face certain death unless he takes them in.

Finally, March 12 come two faith documentaries.

Ancient Secrets of the Bible — The Complete Series is coming on DVD and digital. The 39-episode series, shot on location in five countries and in more than 80 U.S. cities, features re-creations, expert testimony, biblical evidence and scientific experiments to explore biblical questions such as, “Did Adam and Eve really exist and where was the Garden of Eden?”.

Also coming on DVD and digital March 12 is Miracles — The Power of Faith, a four-part documentary series that explores and investigates miracles through interviews with theologians, historians, experts, witnesses, and visits to the locations where it is believed some of the most beautiful and profound miracles occurred.

Four ‘Nova’ Programs Coming to DVD and Digital in January From PBS

Four “Nova” programs are coming to DVD and digital from PBS Distribution in January: Addiction, Volatile Earth: Volcano on the Brink, Flying Supersonic and World’s Fastest Animal.

Nova: Addiction, coming Jan. 8, follows three addicts as they deal with their opioid addictions. The program follows the family of two brothers from West Virginia devastated by the opioid crisis, a woman with a genetic vulnerability to addiction, and a man who used drugs to deal with the stress of prison. The program also explores how to best address the problem from advances in neuroscience to the development of evidence-based treatments to the rethinking of drug laws and policies.

Also due Jan. 8 is Nova: Volatile Earth: Volcano on the Brink, a two-part series on two of the worlds’ most active and mysterious volcanoes in Africa: Nyiragongo and Nyamuragira. Nyiragongo, located on the East African rift in the Virunga Mountains, looms over the city of Goma, home to nearly 1 million people. Nyiragongo’s cones conceal a mile-wide crater that encircles a lava lake bubbling at nearly 1,000° F. It has been a difficult volcano to study due to the long-running war in the Democratic Republic of Congo. NOVA joined an international team of volcanologists on a risky climb to Nyiragongo’s summit and down into its crater to deploy sensors and monitor the volcano’s activity. In part two of the series, a team of volcanologists explores another volcano in the Virunga Mountains in central Africa: Nyamuragira. During a brief pause in the Democratic Republic of Congo’s war, they fly by helicopter to the summit to investigate its secrets.

Nova: Flying Supersonic, coming Jan. 15, puts viewers in the middle of the historic international race to develop the world’s first supersonic airliner, the Concorde, 15 years after the final flight. Viewers go beyond the glamour of jet setting at Mach 2 (twice the speed of sound) and learn about the scientific innovations and political intrigue that helped create the plane. The program also looks to the future and how a new generation of innovators, NASA scientists and others are trying to launch a new era of supersonic passenger planes and travel.

Nova: World’s Fastest Animal, coming Jan. 29, follows the peregrine falcon, the fastest animal in the world, reaching diving speeds of 200 miles per hour — three times the speed of a sprinting cheetah. Though the species nearly went extinct in the 1970s due to the insecticide DDT, the peregrine falcon is now one the most widespread predators on Earth, living on every continent except Antarctica.