Disney’s 20th Century Fox Film Purchase Continues to Underwhelm Financially

Less than six months into Disney’s protracted $71.3 billion acquisition of 20th Century Fox Film and related assets, including Fox’s Hulu stake, the mega transaction continues to underwhelm on the bottom line.

Fox Studios generated a $120 million loss for Disney in the most recent fiscal quarter — driven by box office disappointments Ad Astra, Dark Phoenix and The Art of Racing in the Rain, according to CFO Christine McCarthy.

“The loss from the Fox Studio business was $100 million higher than the loss we estimate the business generated on Q4 last year,” McCarthy said on the Nov. 7 fiscal call.

The CFO attributed consolidation of Hulu’s operating losses (about $1.5 billion for fiscal year) and inter-segment eliminations that resulted in an adverse impact to segment operating income of about $170 million.

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“We estimate the acquisition of [20th Century Fox] and the impact of taking full operational control of Hulu had a total dilutive impact on our Q4 [earnings per share] before purchase accounting of $0.47 per share,” McCarthy said.

Indeed, Fox generated about $260 million in combined ticket sales from six movies halfway through 2019, which was $100 million less than just the opening weekend of Disney/Marvel’s Avengers: Endgame.

Dark Phoenix had the lowest box office of any “X-Men” franchise movie, which resulted in Disney taking an impairment charge on the film.

The results continue what CEO Bob Iger lamented in the previous quarter about Fox’s performance being “well below where it had been, and well below where we hoped it would be when we made the acquisition.”

And the outlook isn’t getting better anytime soon.

McCarthy expects an operating loss in the current first quarter (ending Dec. 31) of about $60 million at the Fox studio, compared with about $30 million operating income in the previous-year period.

“We estimate the acquisition of Fox and the impact of taking full operational control of Hulu will have a dilutive impact on our Q1 earnings per share before purchase accounting of about $0.30 per share,” she said.

McCarthy remains hopeful the Fox acquisition will be accretive to EPS before purchase accounting for fiscal 2021.

 

‘Lion King’ Roars Atop Disc Sales Chart for Second Week

Without much in the way of new competition, Disney’s live-action-style The Lion King remake easily held onto the top spot on the home video sales chart for a second straight week.

Likewise, Disney’s Toy Story 4 held onto the No. 2 spot on the NPD VideoScan First Alert chart, which tracks combined DVD and Blu-ray Disc unit sales, and the dedicated Blu-ray Disc sales chart the week ended Nov. 2.

A third Disney title, the perennial Halloween favorite Hocus Pocus from 1993, was No. 3 on the overall sales chart and No. 7 on the Blu-ray Disc chart. With the end of the Halloween season, however, Hocus Pocus will likely fade from the charts until next year.

The No. 4 overall seller and No. 3 on the Blu-ray list was Sony Pictures’ Spider-Man: Far From Home.

No. 5 on the overall sales chart (and No. 11 on the Blu-ray Chart), was yet another Disney title from 1993, The Nightmare Before Christmas.

With the latest “Spider-Man” sequel being co-produced with Marvel Studios, that means Disney had a hand in the top five titles for the week.

The No. 5 Blu-ray seller was Lionsgate’s John Wick: Chapter 3 — Parabellum, which was the No. 7 overall seller.

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The top new release for the week was Warner’s limited-edition Blu-ray boxed set of Batman Beyond: The Complete Series, at No. 12 overall and No. 6 on the Blu-ray chart. The newest disc release of the 1999-2001 animated series offers most of the episodes remastered in high-definition for the first time.

Warner’s The Wizard of Oz jumped back into the top 10 at No. 9 on both charts thanks to the newly released 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray edition of the film. The Ultra HD edition accounted for 50% of the film’s unit sales for the week.

The Media Play News rental chart for the week ended Nov. 3 had The Lion King at No. 1 again, with Toy Story 4 maintaining the No. 2 spot.

The Redbox-exclusive thriller Running With the Devil, one of the first major new releases under the kiosk operator’s new content and production initiative, debuted at No. 3. The film stars Nicolas Cage and Laurence Fishburne as drug traffickers investigating why their boss’ cocaine shipments are being hijacked.

Fox’s Stuber dropped to No. 4, while Disney’s Aladdin remake was No. 5.

Top 20 Sellers for Week Ended 11-2-19
Top 20 Rentals for Week Ended 11-3-19
Top 20 Selling Blu-ray Discs for Week Ended 11-2-19
Top 20 Blu-ray Market Share for Week Ended 11-2-19

Disney Doubles Direct-to-Consumer Segment Loss to $740 Million

Acquiring control of Hulu and launching a branded subscription streaming video service is expensive.

Disney Nov. 7 reported it lost $740 million in its nascent direct-to-consumer (DTC) business unit in the fourth quarter (ended Sept. 30) — more than double the $340 million operating loss in the previous-year period.

DTC oversees Disney’s foray into over-the-top video distribution, which includes the acquisition of backend support technology provider BAMTech.

The segment generated revenue of $3.4 billion compared to revenue of $825 million last year. For the fiscal year, DTC revenue topped $9.3 billion compared to revenue of $3.4 billion in the previous period.

Operating loss skyrocketed to $1.8 billion in the fiscal year compared to an operating loss of $738 million last year.

The increase was due to the consolidation of Hulu (from Comcast), costs associated with the upcoming launch of Disney+ and ongoing investment in ESPN+, which was launched in April 2018 and has more than 3.5 million paid subscribers. The losses were partially offset by a benefit from the inclusion of the 20th Century Fox businesses driven by income at Star India.

Disney+, which launches on Nov. 12, is not expected to turn a profit until 2024.

CFO Christine McCarthy said Disney’s direct-to-consumer segment is projected to lose upwards of $850 million in the current first quarter through ongoing investments in Disney+ and consolidation of Hulu — the latter ending the fiscal year with 28.5 million subscribers.

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Separately, Disney said studio revenue increased 52% to $3.3 billion and segment operating income increased 79% to $1.07 billion.

Higher operating income was due to an increase in theatrical distribution results, partially offset by a loss from the consolidation of the Fox businesses. The increase in theatrical distribution results was due to the performance of The Lion King, Toy Story 4 and Aladdin in the current quarter compared to Incredibles 2 and Ant-Man And The Wasp in the prior-year quarter.

Operating results at the Fox businesses reflected a loss from theatrical distribution driven by the performance of Ad Astra, Art of Racing In The Rain and Dark Phoenix, partially offset by income from TV/SVOD distribution.

“We’ve spent the last few years completely transforming The Walt Disney Company to focus the resources and immense creativity across the entire company on delivering an extraordinary direct-to-consumer experience,” CEO Bob Iger said in a statement. “We’re excited for the launch of Disney+.”

‘Lion King’ Still Reigns on Redbox Disc Rental Chart

Disney’s The Lion King remake remained No. 1 on the Redbox kiosk disc rental chart the week ended Nov. 3. The Redbox disc rental chart tracks DVD and Blu-ray Disc rentals at the company’s more than 40,000 red kiosks.

Disney’s Toy Story 4 stayed in the No. 2 spot.

The No. 3 disc rental was Redbox Entertainment’s own Running With the Devil, which stars Nicolas Cage and Laurence Fishburne as drug traffickers investigating why their boss’ cocaine shipments are being hijacked.

Stuber, from 20th Century Fox, slid to No. 4 on the disc rental chart and dropped to No. 2 on the Redbox On Demand chart, which tracks digital transactions, including both electronic sellthrough and streaming rentals.

The No. 5 disc rental was Disney’s Aladdin remake.

Sony Pictures’ Spider-Man: Far From Home slid to No. 7 on the disc chart but rose to No. 1 on the digital chart.

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Paramount’s Crawl remained No. 3 on the On Demand chart and was the No. 6 disc rental.

Universal’s The Secret Life of Pets 2 rose to No. 4 on the On Demand chart.

Warner’s Annabelle Comes Home held the No. 5 spot on the digital chart.

Top DVD and Blu-ray Disc Rentals, Redbox Kiosks, Week Ended Nov. 3:

  1. The Lion King — Disney
  2. Toy Story 4 — Disney
  3. Running With the Devil — Redbox
  4. Stuber — Fox
  5. Aladdin (2019) — Disney
  6. Crawl — Paramount
  7. Spider-Man: Far From Home — Sony Pictures
  8. 10 Minutes Gone — Lionsgate
  9. Annabelle Comes Home — Warner
  10. John Wick: Chapter 3 — Parabellum — Lionsgate

 

Top Digital, Redbox On Demand, Week Ended Nov. 3:

  1. Spider-Man: Far From Home — Sony Pictures
  2. Stuber — Fox
  3. Crawl — Paramount
  4. The Secret Life of Pets 2 — Universal
  5. Annabelle Comes Home — Warner
  6. Men In Black: International — Sony Pictures
  7. The Intruder — Sony Pictures
  8. John Wick: Chapter 3 — Parabellum — Lionsgate
  9. The Hustle — MGM
  10. Yesterday — Universal

Disney+ Running Starz Banner Ad in Exchange for Streaming Rights to its Own Movies

Disney CEO Bob Iger says he has no regrets licensing pay-TV rights to original movies for big dollars to Netflix and Starz.

Then came Disney+ and the rush to over-the-top video distribution.

Disney’s massive push to bridge the SVOD divide with Netflix (and Amazon Prime Video) through a branded SVOD service stocked with original movies and TV shows ran into legal challenges since many Disney movies were earmarked for competing distribution channels through pre-existing license agreements.

Thus, getting the company’s singular corporate initiative in 2019 to launch on time reportedly required some creative legal maneuvers behind the scenes.

Disney+ and ESPN+ will run banner ads for the Lionsgate owned Starz pay-TV and standalone SVOD service in exchange for exclusive streaming rights to Star Wars: The Force Awakens, among other titles.

Harrison Ford in ‘Star Wars: The Force Awakens’

The $6.99 Disney+ service had been touted as ad-free. And indeed, there will be no Starz advertising within Disney+ and ESPN+ platforms.

First reported by The Verge and confirmed by Disney, the banner ad will limited to the log-in page and is part of a revised license agreement enabling Disney+ to have access to original movies previously slated for Starz.

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“I think as you can see from what we’re making available, and from seeing some of the titles that we’re making available at launch, there’s been a lot of effort that went into bringing it all back together so that we could make it available on the service,” Michael Paull, head of Disney streaming services, told The Verge in August.

“It’s clear that, from a library perspective, while there’s certainly a lot of volume, the recent studio slate will not fully be available at any one time because of the existing deals and it would take time for those rights, ultimately, to revert back to us,” Iger said last summer.

Agnus Chu, head of content at Disney+, contends license agreements can sometimes be split up “100 different ways.”

“Where it’s been licensed to, who it’s licensed to, and for how long, that gets very complicated,” he said.

James Cameron’s ‘Avatar’ Available on Disney+ at Launch Nov. 12

Director James Cameron’s 2009 box office hit Avatar will be available on Disney+ when the streaming service launches in the United States, Canada and The Netherlands on Nov. 12, followed by Australia and New Zealand on Nov. 19.

Disney+ will be the exclusive subscription streaming home to the film, which will be celebrating the 10th anniversary of its theatrical release on Dec. 18, according to a Disney release.

Disney+ is available now for pre-order in the United States for $6.99 per month or $69.99 per year.

Avatar was the first motion picture of its kind to utilize a new generation of special effects to deliver a fully immersive cinematic experience. The Oscar and Golden Globe-winning epic is the second-highest-grossing film of all time.

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Written by Cameron and produced by Cameron and Jon Landau, Avatar, originally released by Fox, takes place on Pandora, where a man embarks on an epic adventure, ultimately fighting to save both the people he learns to love and the place he now calls home. The film stars Sam Worthington, Zoë Saldana, Sigourney Weaver, Stephen Lang, Michelle Rodriguez, Giovanni Ribisi, Joel David Moore, CCH Pounder, Wes Studi and Laz Alonso.

Cameron recorded a greeting about the Disney+ debut:

‘Lion King’ Remake Reigns Atop Disc Sales Charts

Disney’s live-action-style remake of The Lion King debuted at No. 1 on the NPD VideoScan First Alert chart, which tracks combined DVD and Blu-ray Disc unit sales, and the dedicated Blu-ray Disc sales chart the week ended Oct. 26.

The film, which used advanced CGI to re-create the 1994 animated classic with photorealistic animals, earned $543.2 million at the domestic box office, the No. 2 earner for the year behind Avengers: Endgame.

Another Disney movie, Pixar Animation Studios’ Toy Story 4, dropped to No. 2 for the week after spending two weeks in the top spot on both charts.

No. 3 on the overall sales chart (No. 6 on the Blu-ray chart) was Disney’s perennial Halloween favorite Hocus Pocus.

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Liongate’s 3 From Hell slipped to No. 4 on the overall sales chart and No. 5 on the Blu-ray chart.

Sony Pictures’ Spider-Man; Far From Home was No. 5 on the overall sales chart and No. 4 on the Blu-ray chart.

Debuting as the No. 3 Blu-ray (No. 7 overall) was Warner’s Wonder Woman: Bloodlines, a direct-to-video animated movie.

Blu-ray Disc formats accounted for 79% of first-week Lion King sales, with 9% of its total coming from 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray.

On the Media Play News rental chart for the week ended Oct. 27, Lion King was No. 1, with Toy Story 4 slipping to No. 2.

Fox’s Stuber slid a spot to No. 3, followed by Paramount’s Crawl at No. 4 and Spider-Man: Far From Home at No. 5.

Top 20 Sellers for Week Ended 10-26-19
Top 20 Rentals for Week Ended 10-27-19
Top 20 Selling Blu-ray Discs for Week Ended 10-26-19
Top 20 Blu-ray Market Share for Week Ended 10-26-19
Sales Report for Week Ended 10-26-19

‘Lion King’ Rises Over Redbox Disc Rentals, ‘Stuber’ Remains On Demand No. 1

Disney’s The Lion King remake took over the No. 1 spot on the Redbox kiosk disc rental chart the week ended Oct. 27. The Redbox disc rental chart tracks DVD and Blu-ray Disc rentals at the company’s more than 40,000 red kiosks.

The live-action-style version of the animated classic earned $543.2 million at the domestic box office.

Disney’s Toy Story 4, which was the top title the previous week, in its third week slipped back to No. 2, where it had debuted two weeks prior.

Stuber, from 20th Century Fox, slid to No. 3 on the disc rental chart but remained No. 1 on the Redbox On Demand chart, which tracks digital transactions, including both electronic sellthrough and streaming rentals.

The No. 4 disc rental was Paramount’s Crawl, which was No. 3 on the On Demand chart.

Sony Pictures’ Spider-Man: Far From Home slid to No. 5 on the disc chart but rose to No. 2 on the digital chart.

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Lionsgate’s John Wick: Chapter 3 — Parabellum stayed No. 8 on the rental chart and rose to No. 4 on the On Demand chart.

Warner’s Annabelle Comes Home slipped to No. 7 on the disc chart and No. 5 on the digital chart.

Top DVD and Blu-ray Disc Rentals, Redbox Kiosks, Week Ended Oct. 27:

  1. The Lion King — Disney
  2. Toy Story 4 — Disney
  3. Stuber — Fox
  4. Crawl — Paramount
  5. Spider-Man: Far From Home — Sony Pictures
  6. Aladdin (2019) — Disney
  7. Annabelle Comes Home — Warner
  8. John Wick: Chapter 3 — Parabellum — Lionsgate
  9. Men In Black: International — Sony Pictures
  10. 3 From Hell — Lionsgate

 

Top Digital, Redbox On Demand, Week Ended Oct. 27:

  1. Stuber — Fox
  2. Spider-Man: Far From Home — Sony Pictures
  3. Crawl — Paramount
  4. John Wick: Chapter 3 — Parabellum — Lionsgate
  5. Annabelle Comes Home — Warner
  6. Yesterday — Universal
  7. Men In Black: International — Sony Pictures
  8. The Secret Life of Pets 2 — Universal
  9. Ma — Universal
  10. The Hustle — MGM

The Lion King (2019)

BLU-RAY REVIEW: 

Disney;
Family;
Box Office $543.2 million;
$29.99 DVD, $39.99 Blu-ray, $39.99 UHD BD;
Rated ‘PG’ for sequences of violence and peril, and some thematic elements.
Voices of Donald Glover, Seth Rogen, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Alfre Woodard, Billy Eichner, John Kani, John Oliver, Beyoncé Knowles-Carter, James Earl Jones.

Director Jon Favreau’s new version of The Lion King stands as both a zenith for Disney’s live-action remakes as well as something of a nadir.

As a re-creation of the 1994 animated classic in a live-action style, the film represents a pinnacle of visual effects to simulate photorealistic environments and animals.

On the flip side, the film doesn’t really strive to be anything more than a nearly shot-for-shot remake of the animated film, with mostly the same dialogue and songs as before. As such, it comes across as the most striking example that, from a creative standpoint, there isn’t much of a reason for Disney to produce these remakes other than because it can (and the box office results are certainly proving the merits of those decisions).

Like many of Disney’s live-action remakes, it’s a competent cover version of one of the studio’s popular musicals, so it will always have that watchability factor. The stunning visuals, cute animals and rousing songs will make it as enjoyable for kids today as the original was for its generation of youngsters. But anyone already familiar with the animated version (i.e., the parents of the kids seeing it with fresh eyes) will be hard pressed to see it as more than a curio.

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To my mind, the conversion to the live-action template actually dampens the impact of the story (famously inspired by Hamlet) of young lion Simba growing up in exile after the death of his father, only to return to challenge his uncle, Scar, for leadership of the Pridelands.

As a cartoon, the artistic reality makes it easier to accept the concept of the animals talking and singing. But with a photorealistic setting, the illusion that this is somehow taking place somewhere takes a bit of a hit.

A bolder creative direction might have been to step back from the idea of a strict remake and instead pay a bit of homage to the studio’s cinematic past by styling the film more like one of Disney’s “True-Life Adventures” nature documentaries from the 1950s. Instead of the animals talking and singing, a narrator would explain the story and who the various characters are as they go about their business. The classic songs could even be played as part of the soundtrack over the action, as a few already are (such as “Circle of Life”). Strictly speaking, there really isn’t anything stopping a version like this from being made with the film as it already exists, in the form of a fun, alternate audio track applied to the footage.

It would also be cool if these live-action remakes were connected in some larger cinematic universe, giving them at least some reason to exist beyond milking nostalgia with new versions of older films. Anyone who has seen Tim Burton’s Dumbo knows how easily that film could connect to The Jungle Book. And Jungle Book was of course the film that Favreau directed to pave the way for his gig to redo Lion King. And the fact that some of the films take place in different eras shouldn’t impede the characters meeting, especially since one of the movies has a time-bending Genie in it.

This new version of The Lion King has also generated some buzz over the semantics of referring to it as live-action, given that after the initial shot of the sunrise, the entire movie is digitally animated. To me, the terms “live-action” and “animated” have more to do with aesthetic than they do with photography. The film is meant to depict a real-world environment, and does so using visual effects. A film is typically classified in the “animated” genre because its characters and settings are meant to portray a stylized reality unto itself. There are certainly exceptions here and there, and the digital tools filmmakers now have at their disposal have certainly blurred the lines between what could be considered “animated” and “live-action,” so much so that the discussion over it could be considered something of a cinematic Ship of Theseus.

Consider any real-life scene that could be filmed practically, and imagine touching up that scene with photorealistic CGI. Elements in the background are replaced one by one until the only thing left that was really there is a person in the foreground (not unlike Jungle Book). Now remove the person — you get an “animated” scene of a live-action setting. That’s what Lion King has essentially done, just pushing past the step of shooting something real to begin with. It’s “live-action” when the world has been re-created with visual effects; it’s “animated” when the pictured environment is not meant as a portrayal of something real.

And we see from the extensive Lion King bonus materials how the process of creating this simulated live-action film differs from that of the usual CG animated film, involving animators plugging data into their computer. To better simulate the live-action environment, filmmakers created a virtual reality studio, using a real cinematographer (Caleb Deschanel) and real cameramen walking around the virtual set to craft the image, just as they would any live-action film.

And consider this: The very nature of film projection is an illusion — a procession of still images presented in a sequence meant to fool the eye into perceiving motion. This is the simple truth that made cartoons work in the first place. If anything, traditional cel animation would have as much claim as being “live-action” as anything, considering how they are basically a series of photographs of static drawings that actually existed in the physical realm, which is more than can be said about the artwork of most modern cartoons.

On the Lion King’s home video extras, the process for creating the film shares considerable real estate with some nostalgia for the original, mostly owing to how the filmmakers wanted to be faithful to the story and characters.

Favreau in his informative solo commentary also waxes over the Lion King stage show, which convinced him that the basic musical storytelling elements translated well across whatever visual medium they were presented. Favreau also details the most notable changes between the new and old versions, mostly having to do with toning down the anthropomorphizing of some of the animals and punching up the verisimilitude of musical numbers where the animation could depict some colorful, wacky dance sequences. Favreau also provides a minute-long introduction to the film.

The centerpiece of the extras is the three-part “The Journey to The Lion King” documentary that runs about 54 minutes in total. “The Music” (14 minutes) deals with updates to the original music, which involved bringing Hans Zimmer to reprise the score, and the new cast’s reaction to singing the well-known songs; plus, Beyoncé added a song, and Elton John, who wrote the original songs, recorded a new song for the end credits. “The Magic” (21 minutes) focuses on the filmmaking techniques employed in the film, blending live-action photographic techniques with virtual reality and CGI. “The Timeless Tale” (19 minutes) lets the filmmakers reflect on the legacy of the original film.

Three “More to Be Scene” segments take an iconic musical sequence from the film and show the different layers needed to create the scene, from storyboards to rough animation to voice recording, compared with the final product. The songs include “Circle of Life,” “I Just Can’t Wait to Be King” and “Hakuna Matata.”

Finally, the Blu-ray and digital presentations include music videos for the new Elton John song, “Never Too Late,” and the new Beyoncé song, “Spirit.”

There’s also a sing-along viewing mode for the film, plus seven song sequences playable on their own with text lyrics. That should keep the little ones happy without watching the whole film again.

The three-minute “Protect the Pride” is a PSA featuring Favreau pleading for the conservation of lions and their habitats.

There are also a couple of digital-exclusive extras. The three-minute “Perfecting the Pride” details the filmmakers taking a research trip to Africa, while the three-and-a-half-minute “Pride Lands Pedia” is a fun video hosted by Dembe the dung beetle, who profiles some of the animals and environments seen in the film.

 

‘Toy Story 4’ Spends Second Week as Top Disc Seller

Disney’s Toy Story 4 was again the No. 1 title on the national home video sales charts the week ended Oct. 19.

The latest Pixar Animation Studios sequel had debuted in the top spot a week before on both the NPD VideoScan First Alert chart, which tracks combined DVD and Blu-ray Disc unit sales, and the dedicated Blu-ray Disc sales chart.

Disney’s Hocus Pocus, a perennial Halloween favorite since its debut in 1993, was No. 2 on the overall sales chart and No. 6 on the Blu-ray Disc chart.

Lionsgate’s 3 From Hell, the latest horror film from Rob Zombie, debuted at No. 3 overall and No. 2 on the Blu-ray chart.

Sony Pictures’ Spider-Man: Far From Home slipped to No. 4 on the overall sales chart and No. 3 on the Blu-ray chart.

Another new horror movie, Paramount’s Crawl, entered the chart at No. 5 overall and No. 4 on the Blu-ray chart. It earned $39 million at U.S. theaters.

The No. 5 Blu-ray was Lionsgate’s John Wick: Chapter 3 — Parabellum, which was No. 7 overall.

The only other new release in the top 10 was Disney-owned Fox’s Stuber, at No. 8 on  both charts. The comedy earned $22.4 million at the domestic box office.

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Toy Story 4 also moved to the top of the Media Play News rental chart for the week, after debuting in the second spot a week earlier.

Stuber debuted at No. 2, followed by Crawl at No. 3.

Spider-Man: Far From Home slipped three spots to No. 4, while Disney’s live-action Aladdin was No. 5.

Top 20 Sellers for Week Ended 10-19-19
Top 20 Rentals for Week Ended 10-20-19
Top 20 Selling Blu-ray Discs for Week Ended 10-19-19
Top 20 Blu-ray Market Share for Week Ended 10-19-19
Sales Report for Week Ended 10-19-19
Digital Sales Snapshot for Week Ended 10-21-19