Crackle Gets Exclusive Access to ‘Everyday Edisons’

Crackle, the former Sony ad-supported VOD service now owned by Chicken Soup for the Soul Entertainment (CSSE), has inked a distribution deal with Edison Nation for the fifth season of the Emmy Award–winning series “Everyday Edisons,” which will debut exclusively on Crackle in March.

The original four season of the series ran on PBS beginning in 2006. Featuring real inventors, the reboot includes eight new episodes, four judges and 24 new inventors. The show connects inventors with a team of mentors who provide advice in advance of their pitch before a panel of judges.

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Bringing the series back are Chris Ferguson, CEO of Edison Nation, Michael Cable, original series producer and winner of 23 Emmy Awards — including one for Outstanding Educational / Informational Program for “Everyday Edisons” — and Louis Foreman, CEO of Eventys Partners and original series co- creator.

“With its tremendous audience reach and reputation for original inspirational reality programming such as “Going from Broke” and “On Point,” Crackle is the perfect home for Everyday Edisons,” Ferguson said in a statement.

On the show, inventors gain insight on how extraordinary ideas are taken from, for example, a sketch on a napkin to a store shelf. Each episode features three inventors, each of whom has been coached by mentors, including 2019 PBA Player of the Year Jason Belmonte.

The mentors offer expert advice and help the inventors refine their pitch before presenting their unique idea to a panel of respected industry professionals. The panel includes Foreman, Ferguson, and Kelly Bagla, CEO of Go Legal Yourself, as lead judges.

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A fourth guest judge will appear in each of the episodes, including the following:

Lily Winnail — Winnail is a mompreneur, CEO and found of Padalily
Brian Fried — A successful inventor himself, Fried mentors and represents “Individual Inventors” to “Celebrities” at all stages of the invention process and is known as the Inventor Coach.
Tiffany Norwood — Norwood is a serial entrepreneur, global speaker and inventor who raised $670 million to fund WorldSpace, the first ever global digital satellite radio start-up.
Fred Cary — Cary is a senior executive, strategic consultant, attorney and investment banker. He is also the co-founder of IdeaPros.
Howie Busch — Serial Inventor and Founder of DudeRobe (as seen on Shark Tank).

One winner will be announced at the end of each episode. This inventor will receive a monetary prize of $5,000 plus a chance to work with Edison Nation to bring their product to market.

“When ‘Everyday Edisons’ first premiered in 2006, there was no other program like it,” said Michael Cable, show producer. “It is the original ‘pitch’ program and has launched many successful inventions.”

The new season will showcase various products ranging from new oral care products for individuals with disabilities to innovative new shovels, blow dryer accessories, 3-dimensional playing cards, and customizable blankets, among others.

Season 4 of “Everyday Edisons” is available for free on Crackle starting today.

TiVo: Ad-Supported VOD Gaining Traction

The subscription streaming video market is getting crowded. Pioneering behemoths like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime Video dominate, spending tens of billions of dollars on original content to lure and retain subscribers in the face of newcomers Apple TV+, Disney+, HBO Max, Peacock and Quibi, among others.

As a result, ad-supported VOD content is attracting greater market share, according to new data from TiVo, which found the average U.S. household had 6.9 streaming services in the fourth quarter 2019, up from five services during the same period in 2017.

At more than 73%, YouTube remains the most popular source of free streaming content, followed closely by Facebook (62.3%). Free video from network sites has skyrocketed in popularity (up 31.9% from the previous-year period), while Crackle (+2.4%), Tubi (+3.8 %), The Roku Channel (o.2%), Xumo, Vevo (+5.4%) and Twitch (+3.3%) also gained viewers.

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Indeed, 37.5% of respondents from a fourth-quarter online survey of 6,145 participants in the United States and Canada, said they were “very satisfied” with AVOD, up from 35.4% during the previous-year period. That compared to 33.1% who said they were “very satisfied” with SVOD, down from 33.5% last year.

As expected, the report found that most respondents still find new movies and TV shows to watch through SVOD services Netflix (34.7%) and Prime Video (25.2%), followed closely by free YouTube videos (23%) and pay-TV (21.2%).

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For TV series that consumers watch regularly, it’s a different story. TiVo said pay-TV dominates, with 35% of respondents indicating they find new episodes of their regularly watched series through cable or satellite TV.

Notably, respondents cited transactional VOD services such as iTunes, Amazon, Redbox On Demand, Vudu, and Google Play, among others, as go-to platforms in search of new movie content. That was ahead of platforms such as Hulu, Showtime OTT and Starz.

Another 54% of respondents say they find out about new shows or movies from commercials or ads that run within their current pay-TV or AVOD content.

“Consumers are increasingly ready and willing to adopt innovative (yet simple) technology, devices or services that can serve as guides on their quest to find what they want to watch,” read the report. “They need technology that adds value to their lives, whether by helping them efficiently locate the content they’re looking for or by leading them to the video pathways that suit their needs and desires.”

 

TiVo Adds Content Partners to Streaming Video Service

TiVo Jan. 8 formally announced an additional 23 new content partners for its ad-supported TiVo+ video network. The new channels join the current lineup of 26 streaming channels available to TiVo customers.

New content partners include USA Today, Cheddar, Top Stories by Newsy, Sportswire and MMA Junkie. Lifestyle channels include Condé Nast, Tastemade, Latido Music, Mobcrush and Revry.

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The Condé Nast partnership will bring programming from Glamour, Bon Appetit, Traveler, GQ and Wired, while the Tastemade partnership will bring Food, Travel and Home Design programming.

The comedy genre will expand to include “Funny or Die” and “The Chive”. TiVo+ Kids, movies and TV categories will now include “Mr. Bean & Friends,” “Kabillion,” “Law & Crime,” “American Classics,” “OMG! Network” and “Reel Truth.”

TiVo+ is attempting to join a growing ad-supported VOD market that includes The Roku Channel, Amazon’s IMDb TV, Pluto TV, Tubi, Shout! Factory TV and Crackle, among others.

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“In a world where people have more entertainment subscriptions than they can count on one hand, TiVo is working to bring everything together in one place for viewers,” CEO Dave Shull said in a statement.

 

AVOD: Quiet Before the Storm

With the crush of new subscription streaming VOD services entering 2020, new data from Ampere Analysis suggests ad-supported VOD, or AVOD, will build scale and roll-out internationally this year.

While AVOD use within the United States remains small compared to SVOD (from 3% to 6% of domestic online households), London-based Ampere believes this to be merely the quiet before the storm.

Major AVOD players include Pluto TV, Tubi, Crackle, Vudu, IMDb TV, Roku TV, Xumo TV, Shout! Factory TV and pending Peacock from NBC Universal, which will also be SVOD, among others.

Specifically, the researcher contends AVOD is filling the niche previously targeted by SVOD: catalog content. As SVOD services such as Netflix, Amazon Prime Video and Hulu migrate toward original programming, AVOD streams older content for free — with advertising.

The proportion of Netflix’s catalog more than five years old fell from 50% in Sept. 2015 to 35% in Sept. 2019 — a trend that will continue across the sector. In the meantime, the long tail of older content has been embraced by the new AVOD services, who average nearly 80% of their catalog at five years old by title count, and in the case of Crackle, 70% of content is over 10 years old.

This demand for older content not only provides a new market for licensing deep archive, but also offers a boon for distributors and sales agents, according to Ampere.

“AVOD is coming, and it’s going to make its mark on the VOD landscape rapidly,” Guy Bisson, director at Ampere, said in a statement. “Its impact will be felt not just by the entertainment industry, but by advertising too as the shift that has already disrupted the subscription television market sweeps across the free-to-air sector.”

As advertisers rush to support AVOD, online video advertising will inevitably increase as the platforms spread globally in 2020. To date this form of advertising has remained relatively small — even in developed markets like the U.S. where 27.2% of online ad spend is on video, and in Canada where it’s just 5.85%.

Ampere expects the rush to AVOD to be supercharged by some of the studio direct models such as Disney’s Hulu and Peacock, which are expected to adopt a hybrid SVOD/AVOD model.

“AVOD services are treading a well-trodden path with an early reliance on older content, but as their market position grows, we can expect them to begin acquiring newer content and even moving into original production activity as they battle for eyeballs in an increasingly crowded market,” Bisson said.

Ashton Kutcher-Produced ‘Going From Broke’ Series Tops 5 Million Views in Four Weeks on Crackle Plus

Media company Chicken Soup for the Soul Entertainment said its new Crackle Original, “Going From Broke,” from executive producer Ashton Kutcher and Matador Content has generated more five million views in four weeks since its Oct. 17th launch on Crackle.

The original series puts a spotlight on a fiscal epidemic that more 44 million Americans collectively owe $1.5 trillion in federal student loan debt — a tally second only to mortgage debt.

Upon graduation, the series contends college grads entering the professional world face mounds of bills, a shrinking pool of employment opportunities and a lack of financial skills, among other issues.

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“This show has struck a chord with viewers,” William Rouhana Jr., CEO of Chicken Soup for the Soul Entertainment, said in a statement. “There is clearly a need for this important dialog. We are encouraged by the feedback and are now considering the possibility of a second season.”

In the original series, Chegg CEO Dan Rosensweig and financial expert Danetha Doe go one-on-one with young people living in pricey Los Angeles, what they thought would be The City of Dreams, to change their habits and gain financial confidence and become CEO of their own lives. Although they all come from different backgrounds and circumstances, each of the participants have one thing in common — extreme debt.

‘Going From Broke’ is executive produced by Ashton Kutcher, Rouhana and Michael Winter for Chicken Soup for the Soul Entertainment. For Matador Content, Todd Lubin, Jay Peterson, Joel Relampagos and Jerry Carita also serve as executive producers.

Crackle is available on all top streaming platforms, connected TVs, game consoles, Crackle mobile apps (iOs, Android) and at Crackle.com. Follow #GoingFromBroke on Crackle’s Facebook and Twitter pages. Visit goingfrombroke.com for more information about the series.

As Planet Earth Turns to Streaming Video, ViacomCBS Aims for Pluto (TV)

Prior to Viacom’s re-merger with CBS Corp., the media giant had scant over-the-top video properties. Now with the addition of CBS All Access and Showtime OTT, the company claims about 16 million paying subscription streaming subscribers.

That’s 20% less than the 20 million monthly viewers who stream content for free on Pluto TV — the San Francisco-based ad-supported VOD service Viacom acquired earlier this year for $340 million.

That user tally reflects a 70% year-over-year gain in consumer traction for Pluto and underscores Viacom’s strategic move to compete against Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, Disney+ and other high-profile SVOD services with old-school ad-supported content.

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“Our focus on an investment in Pluto is evident,” Bob Bakish, CEO of ViacomCBS, said on the recent fiscal call. “In Q4 alone, Pluto launched 43 new channels and last month, Pluto Latino added 11 new channels given the platform of total 22 channels with over 4,000 hours of Spanish and Portuguese language programming.”

The opportunity for Pluto TV Latino is significant given the size of the Hispanic population, as well as gaps within the existing programming landscape. As the largest minority market, the group has a combined buying power of $1.5 trillion, according to research from the University of Georgia.

The once-dominant Spanish-language broadcast network, Univision, has been steadily losing viewers for years and has been locked in a battle with Comcast-owned Telemundo for younger, bilingual viewers. Meanwhile, streaming services such as Hulu, Sling, and fuboTV offer Spanish-language content, but the additional cost of these services is leading to “subscription fatigue.”

“There are all sorts of creative programming ideas we can test with the audience that hasn’t been done before,” Tom Ryan, co-founder and CEO of Pluto TV, said. “If they work, we can be nimble and double down on them.”

Indeed, AVOD revenue is projected to more than double between 2018 and 2024, topping $56 billion across 138 countries — including the U.S.

Next year, NBC Universal is launching an ad-supported streaming service dubbed “Peacock,” which joins industry players such Tubi TV, which bowed in 2014 with more than 9,000 movies and television shows, Amazon’s IMDb TV and The Roku Channel, among others.

“The U.S. will more than triple its AVOD revenue total between 2018 and 2024 to $19.23 billion — or 34% of the global total,” said Simon Murray, analyst with Digital TV Research.

Bakish said Viacom would continue to grow Pluto TV distribution globally and on new platforms, which he said would benefit both viewers and business partners.

He said Pluto has not only been a driver to restoring overall Viacom ad sales growth, it’s also been a platform to enable Viacom to “radically” increase the number of clients it does business with.

“In the crowded subscription universe, as consumers become increasingly more value conscious, we strongly believe that having the leading free streaming service in the country and over time, the world is a huge competitive advantage,” Bakish said.

 

Crackle Plus Original Series ‘Going From Broke’ Generates 1 Million Views in Five Days

Ad-supported VOD service Crackle Plus Oct. 24 announced that its original series “Going From Broke,” from executive producer Ashton Kutcher, generated 1 million views during its first five days on the platform.

Crackle was acquired last year from Sony by Chicken Soup for the Soul Entertainment, a publicly-traded media company.

The series, which debuted on Oct. 17, puts a spotlight on the epidemic of student loan debt. According to reports, more than 44 million Americans collectively owe $1.5 trillion on their federal student loans — a tally second only to mortgage debt in America.

Upon graduation, the series contends those entering the professional world face mounds of bills, a shrinking pool of employment opportunities, a lack of financial skills and a constant, crippling weight of bills keeping them from reaching for their dreams.

“The series is incredibly relevant and relatable and has clearly resonated with our millennial consumers,” Philippe Guelton, president of Crackle Plus, said in a statement.

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In the series, Chegg CEO Dan Rosensweig and financial expert Danetha Doe go one on one with young people living in pricey Los Angeles to change their spending habits and gain financial confidence and become CEO of their own lives.

“It’s clear, based on the incredible engagement with the show, that there is a strong need for content and support around personal finance,” Rosensweig said.

Crackle is available on all top streaming platforms, connected TVs, game consoles, Crackle mobile apps (iOS, Android) and at Crackle.com.

Sony Seeking Fiscal Partner for Crackle

Sony Pictures Entertainment reportedly is looking for a fiscal partner to help expand Crackle.com, the ad-supported streaming video service it acquired in 2006 for $65 million.

In an employee email first reported by Deadline, Mike Hopkins, former CEO of Hulu and now chairman of Sony Pictures Television, said that the right minority partner could help “drive scale and position [Crackle] to be more competitive.”

“Crackle is a tremendously valuable asset for us, and with premium [ad-supported VOD] getting more and more traction as advertisers seek high value online advertising opportunities, we feel there is room for greater growth for our OTT business,” Hopkins wrote. “With the right partner – one that could bring additional content or users or leverage existing assets for advertising and promotion – we feel we can expand Crackle’s audience and significantly increase revenue.”

The streaming platform is recent years has moved into original programming to better compete against Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime Video and Roku’s ad-supported channel, among others.

Original forays included “The Art of More,” and “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee” featuring Jerry Seinfeld playing hooky with various celebrities, including then-President Barack Obama. The series has since been acquired by Netflix.

Crackle just announced it will begin streaming the second season of original series, “Snatch,” starring Harry Potter’s Rupert Grint, who is also an executive producer of the 10-episode drama.

 

 

 

Research: Customers More Satisfied With Video Streaming Than With TV Subscription Services

Customer satisfaction with video streaming services far eclipses that of subscription TV service, according to the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) 2018 Telecommunications Report.

Video streaming services debuted in this year’s telecom report with an ACSI score of 75, well above subscription TV’s score of 62, which declined 3.1% from last year.

“Video streaming services significantly outperformed subscription TV,” said David VanAmburg, managing director at the ACSI, in a statement. “Streaming services don’t have the hidden fees and six-month rates that subscription TV does, not to mention they’re cheaper and simpler. But because consumers don’t have many options when choosing a subscription TV provider, those businesses don’t see a lot of risk in customer dissatisfaction, and we’re unlikely to see dramatic changes any time soon.”

The American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) measures and analyzes customer satisfaction with more than 380 companies in 46 industries and 10 economic sectors. Reported on a scale of 0 to 100, ACSI scores are based on data from interviews with roughly 250,000 customers annually. The ACSI Telecommunications Report 2018 includes data on subscription TV services, video streaming, video-on-demand, internet service providers, fixed-line and wireless telephone services, and cell phone manufacturers. It’s based on 45,292 customer surveys collected between April 19, 2017 and March 17, 2018. The full report is available for download here.

With an ACSI score of 75, video streaming services were the highest-performing telecom industry measured in the 2018 study. Netflix, Sony PlayStation Vue, and Twitch all led the pack, tying at a score of 78. Apple iTunes and the Microsoft Store took second place at 77, with YouTube Red in third at 76.

Amazon Prime Video, Google Play, Hulu, and Vudu all registered at the industry average of 75, followed by the network channel subscriptions: CBS All Access at 74, and HBO Now and Starz at 72.

Bringing up the rear were Sling TV (71), DIRECTV NOW (70), Showtime Anytime (70), and Sony Crackle (68).

Still, even Sony Crackle in last place rated higher than nearly all subscription TV services.

Video streaming services received high marks for ease of understanding the bill (80), website satisfaction (80), and call centers (75), but customers downgraded them on availability of the current season’s TV shows (71) and availability of new movie titles (69).

Customer satisfaction with subscription TV fell to 62, an 11-year low for the industry.

AT&T’s U-verse TV topped the list with a 70, one of only two scores that stayed the same instead of dropping. Verizon Fios fell 4% year over year to a 68 for second place, while DISH Network held steady at 67 for third.

In the middle of the pack, DIRECTV and Optimum both fell 6% to 64 and 62, respectively. Cox Communications shed 2% to 60, while Spectrum and Suddenlink both plunged 8% to 58.

Comcast Xfinity decreased 27% to 57, Frontier Communications dropped 7% to 56, and Mediacom placed last with a 55, down 2%.

The top-rated part of the subscription TV experience was HD picture quality, which holds steady at a score of 80. Picture quality was close behind, down 1% to 78.

While courtesy and helpfulness of store and service center staff had a relatively good score of 77, and speed of store and service center transactions received a 76, call center satisfaction continued to be the weak spot of the industry, slipping 3% to 63.

“If you look at retail, airlines, and many other industries, companies like to reward customer loyalty, offering perks or discounts for doing business with them,” said VanAmburg in a statement. “Telecom is the exact opposite. In many ways, loyalty is punished because subscription TV is focused on customer acquisition and offering the best deal to lure customers away from competitors. In the long run, that doesn’t leave customers very satisfied.”

Among video-on-demand services, AT&T’s U-verse TV took the top spot with a 74, followed by DISH Network at 73, and Verizon Fios at 72. At 70, AT&T’s DirecTV came in far below its U-verse offering, but ahead of the industry average.

Optimum led all cable companies in video-on-demand at the industry average of 68, while Cox Communications and Xfinity tied at 67, and Spectrum came in last at 64.

Video-on-demand viewers were pleased with the number of TV shows (75), current seasons (74) and variety by category (74) available. However, the availability of a past season’s shows was lacking (69) as were free on-demand content (69) and new movie titles (68). Call centers received the lowest marks (67), but call center service performed better for on-demand customers than for internet and subscription TV.

While video streaming services received much better customer satisfaction scores than subscription TV, obviously viewers still need internet access to get it. Unfortunately, internet service providers (ISPs), along with subscription TV, had the lowest customer satisfaction of all industries tracked by the ACSI.

ISPs were down 3.1% to 62, and while customers clearly weren’t satisfied with their service, more than half of Americans had only one choice for high-speed broadband. Every major ISP deteriorated this year except Xfinity, which remains unchanged.

Verizon Fios stayed in first place at 70 after a 1% dip. AT&T Internet also fell 1% for a second-place score of 68, followed by Optimum, which dropped 6% to 64.

Suddenlink and Spectrum both plummeted 8% to 61 and 60, respectively, followed by Xfinity, unchanged at 60. Mediacom placed last with a 53 after a 9% fall from last year.

Call center satisfaction, already low, fell another 3% to 59. Customers were also less satisfied with overall data transfer speed, which sank 3% to 67, and the variety of internet plans available, which fell 3% to 64. The one bright spot was courtesy and helpfulness of store and service center staff and speed of store and service center transactions, at 76 and 74, respectively, though both were down from last year.

Indie Company Rises With New Vision

“Roseanne” is once again a success on TV — and capitalizing on that reboot is a company flying quietly under the radar with digital rights to the classic Roseanne Barr series and others from television production stalwart Carsey-Werner.

That company is FilmRise, which, along with CEO Danny Fisher and his partners, has risen from the ashes of bankruptcy on a vision of digital content distribution.

“My brother and I went personally bankrupt in 2012,” recalls Danny Fisher. “We lost it all, and I had a vision for a company that was digitally minded, and we created that company in the basement and kitchen of my house, my Brooklyn brownstone.”

Starting with a handful of titles, one of which Jack Fisher (now president of FilmRise) had produced, the two brothers, together with third founder, current chairman Alan Klingenstein, built a business. They raised an initial $200,000 from a couple of investors to prove an essentially digital distribution concept, and FilmRise took off.

“In the last two years, we’ve raised $112 million, we have a 15,000-square-foot office, we have 65 people on staff, and the company’s been in the black for several years,” Fisher said. “We’re doing very well.”

Danny Fisher said the company has three key businesses: acquisition and distribution, which includes such successes as the theatrical feature My Friend Dahmer and the Carsey-Werner deal; AVOD, advertising-supported video-on-demand streaming services under the FilmRise banner; and original television production, a new venture.

On the acquisition and distribution side, “in the digital space, we are one of top aggregators for Amazon Prime and we’ve been very close to Amazon from the days of working out of my basement,” Fisher said. “Of course, we work with Netflix, Hulu, many other platforms as well and including pay-TV.”

But they also acquire features, such as My Friend Dahmer.

“We don’t sort of have a brand in the sense that we are an art house, or genre house,” Fisher said.  “We take on everything. I don’t mean we take on everything like everything that comes our way. We are extremely selective. What I mean is we work with a lot of different genres, everything from art house to foreign language to mainstream commercial films.”

How does the company decide what to acquire?

“There is a proprietary method that we have that my investors are not even privy to so I have to leave that part, but I will just say that’s a model that I developed in my basement,” Fisher said. “Essentially, we’ve been able to figure out how to acquire titles the people want to see. We figured that part out. How we get there is a little more involved. We look for quality content that we believe to have viewers. Whether they are DVD buyers or whether they are watching in a theater or watching online — we acquire titles that people want to see.”

As for the second aspect of the business, advertising-based VOD, FilmRise has expanded rapidly in an arena that many have ignored as SVOD has taken the spotlight.

“We launched a while ago but it’s really only in the last few months we’ve gotten to real critical mass where it’s become a real key part of our business. We have our own streaming network and our streaming network is ad-supported,” Fisher said. “Currently, we have 22 channels on Roku. We’re now just launched on Xbox and Windows and we are about to launch on Amazon Fire TV and Apple TV as well as mobile applications worldwide.”

While Crackle might be one of the best-known AVOD platforms, FilmRise is quietly rising in the space.

“I think we are approaching the size of Crackle probably,” Fisher said. “We are kind of under the radar. If you look at the Roku ranks, FilmRise [with all of its channels] is right behind Crackle.”

FilmRise has many different genre-based, ad-supported VOD channels, such as FilmRise Documentary, FilmRise Thriller, FilmRise Gay & Lesbian and FilmRise Horror.

Fisher sees an opportunity in ad-supported VOD.

“What about those people who can’t afford or don’t want to pay any money? It’s a different kind of audience,” he said. “They’re willing to watch a commercial in order to have it for free and to have no obligations, to have to get a cable box or to have to pay Netflix or anybody a fee. It’s a different type of audience. When you think worldwide, it’s a really, really big audience, I mean it’s a billion plus audience. It’s a less glamorous audience, because right now you’re not going to be able to produce ‘Orange is the New Black’ and ‘House of Cards’ and ‘Stranger Things’ and all that for an ad-supported channel.”

But “right now” isn’t what FilmRise is all about. They are indeed getting into original TV production, the third aspect of their business, planning for the future.

“We brought onboard to be head of production Vlad Wolynetz [formerly with AMC], and he oversaw production of shows like ‘Mad Men,’ ‘Breaking Bad,’ ‘The Walking Dead,’ and most recently produced ‘Waco’ for Paramount,” Fisher said. “He’s head of production and what we’re looking to do there is enter into co-productions and co-financing deals with other entities, and we’re in discussions right now with major studios and major networks on some very substantial deals.”

None of these plans seem unusual for a company planning to follow the axioms of the day in entertainment — the right acquisitions (including distribution on disc, which is still “a solid business,” Fisher said), digital AVOD and original productions.

“We’re trying to be hopefully just a little bit smarter than everybody else,” Fisher said. “We don’t have to be a lot smarter. We just have to be like 1% smarter than everybody else to be successful.”