Cinedigm Inks Distribution Deal with China’s CMC Pictures

Cinedigm March 19 announced a partnership with CMC Pictures, distributor of Chinese movies and television shows. Under the deal, Cinedigm will release select CMC Pictures theatrical titles on DVD/Blu-ray Disc, digital, and television.

CMC Pictures titles include sci-fi title The Wandering Earth, Pegasus, Wolf Warrior 2, Detective Chinatown 2, and Animal World, among others.

“CMC Pictures represents the highest caliber of Chinese productions across a wide range of genres and with cast recognizable to international audiences,” Yolanda Macias, EVP of acquisitions and digital sales at Cinedigm, said in a statement.

Established in 2016, the studio operates as the international sales and distribution arm of China Media Capital Inc., a Chinese state-backed media and entertainment conglomerate producing movies and TV content, in addition to related businesses such as artist and sports agencies, cinemas, urban recreational complexes and theme parks.

Last summer CMC raised $1.5 billion in venture funding from China’s Alibaba Group Holding and Tencent Holdings, among other investors. CMC owns a stake in English Premier League soccer franchise Manchester United and a separate joint venture with Warner Bros. Entertainment.

The company is headed by Ruigang Li, often considered China’s Rupert Murdoch.

CMC Inc. founder/CEO Li Ruigang

The first picture under the Cinedigm deal includes The Road Not Taken, an offbeat road picture, following a bumbling ostrich farmer (Wang Xuebing), who journeys across the Gobi Desert in hopes of reconciling with his estranged wife, but ends up forming a makeshift family along the way.

The picture, directed by first time filmmaker Gaopeng Tang, screened as a selection of the “Focus on China” event at the 2018 Venice Film Festival, and was an official Golden Globe submission in the Foreign Language film category for China.

The pact reflects Cinedigm’s increasing role as go-to distributor for the distribution of Chinese content in North America. Majority-owned by Bison Capital, a Hong Kong based investment firm, Cinedigm recently announced the launch of Bambu, a digital channel which will be focused on Chinese content. Bambu will be available via major streaming devices and pay-TV carriage later this year in the US.

Cinedigm Acquiring AVOD Platform ‘Future Today’ for $60 Million

Cinedigm March 15 announced it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Future Today, one of the largest ad-supported VOD networks, for $45 million in cash and $15 million in Cinedigm common stock.

The acquisition increases Cinedigm’s over-the-top video footprint to over 7.6 million monthly active users and 67 million total app installs.

The Los Angeles-based home entertainment distributor said Future Today, which owns and operates more than 700 content channels with more than 60 million app installs, and manages more than 200,000 film, television and digital content assets,generated about $23.9 million in revenue in 2018.

Future Today brands include Fawesome.tv, focused on general entertainment movies & television shows, and HappyKids.tv, providing age-specific edutainment in the connected TV market.

Alok Ranjan and Vikrant Mathur, co-founders of Future Today, will continue to lead the subsidiary as co-presidents, entering into long-term employment agreements with Cinedigm upon the deal closing.

“Building our stake in the rapidly surging AVOD business is a top priority for Cinedigm, and the acquisition instantaneously transforms our company into the world’s largest provider of premium [ad-supported] content,” Chris McGurk, chairman/CEO of Cinedigm said in a statement.

Future Today’s cloud-based technology and ad-based monetization platform manages OTT services for more than 350 content owners, producers, distributors and major media companies helping them launch and monetize connected TV channels across all devices.

“Alok and Vikrant have built Future Today into one of the most respected and fastest growing companies monetizing video content today,” said Erick Opeka, president of Cinedigm Digital Networks. “Their entrepreneurial spirit and deep knowledge of the video ad space, combined with Cinedigm’s content and relationships, will be a formidable and compelling combination in the rapidly growing AVOD segment.”

The transaction is expected to close in the second calendar quarter of 2019 and is subject to customary closing conditions.

Cinedigm Launching Comedy Streaming Video Service

Cinedigm March 12 announced a partnership with Comedy Dynamics to launch and distribute their over-the-top video branded Comedy Dynamics Network.

Cinedigm Digital Networks will provide digital distribution of the channel, including third-party platforms, a-la-carte licensing, and a live linear channel.

The Los Angeles-based home entertainment distributor said its networks platform affords Comedy Dynamics the ability to launch both as an ad-supported VOD and SVOD service across mobile devices, connected TVs, and set-top boxes.

The linear channel is slated to roll-out in the spring showcasing Comedy Dynamics’ library of performers, including Jim Gaffigan, Kevin Hart, Ali Wong, Tiffany Haddish, Bill Hicks, D.L. Hughley and Sam Kinison, among others.

“This is an exciting time for comedy, as people are accessing it and demanding it like never before,” Erick Opeka, president of Cinedigm Digital Networks, said in a statement. “The stand-up medium is the perfect complement to the digital realm, providing incredible opportunities for both short-form and long-form content that viewers can enjoy whether they’re at home or on the go.”

Indeed, while Netflix is spending lavishly on stand-up specials featuring Hart (bowing April 2), Ellen DeGeneres, Chris Rock, Hasan Minhaj and Amy Schumer, among others, standalone comedy remains a tough sell.

NBC Universal in 2016 shuttered standalone $3.99 monthly comedy streaming service Seeso, while the Lionsgate/Hart OTT collaboration – Laugh Out Loud – tries to get its footing since bowing in 2017.

Regardless, Comedy Dynamics CEO Brian Volk-Weiss contends there exists a global streaming audience for comedy.

“We want to be everywhere the audience is,” he said.

 

WWII Drama ‘Mission of Honor’ Takes Off on Digital March 15, Disc in April From Cinedigm

The World War II drama Mission of Honor will come out in select theaters and on digital and VOD March 15 from Cinedigm.

It will hit Blu-ray and DVD in late April.

The film stars Iwan Rheon (Game of Thrones,”“Misfits,” “Inhumans”), Milo Gibson (Gangster Land, Hacksaw Ridge) and Marcin Dorocinski (Jack Strong). Based on a true story, Mission of Honor follows Jan Zumbach (Rheon) and Squadron 303, a group of fighter pilots enlisted by the British Royal Airforce after a war-torn Europe has been ransacked by German Nazis. John Kent ‘Kentowski’ (Gibson) has his work cut out for him when he’s handed the angry, defeated, and often maligned squadron to command. Squadron 303 works through language barriers, cultural differences, grief and PTSD to become one of the greatest secret weapons in the Battle of Britain.

The film is directed by BAFTA winner David Blair.

Cinedigm Closes Acquisition of Viewster and Subsidiary Viewster Anime

Cinedigm Feb. 5 announced the acquisition of video-on-demand service Viewster and its subsidiary Viewster Anime, in a deal that bolsters Cinedigm’s extensive OTT content portfolio.

The Los Angeles-based home entertainment distributor immediately takes over ownership and management of all Viewster and Viewster Anime content, augmenting the platforms’ roster of offerings into Cinedigm’s library of channels and content, with select programming debuting on the latter’s lifestyle network CONtv.

Cinedigm will also overseeing operation of all content, applications and social assets belonging to both platforms. Ad sales will be handled in-house and through Cinedigm’s network of partners.

Viewster Anime will continue to exist as a subscription channel on Amazon Channels as well as on The Roku Channel. Cinedigm also plans to bring ad-supported, linear and subscription offerings of Viewster to additional OEM, cable, telco and digital partners over the next several quarters.

“Viewster and Viewster Anime are perfect complements to our growing base of premium content networks,” Erick Opeka, president of Cinedigm Digital Networks, said in a statement. “The acquisition of Viewster strengthens our market position in the fandom space, dramatically increases our global footprint, and greatly accelerates our plans to grow our ad-supported businesses.”

Founded in Zurich, Switzerland in 2007, Viewster has emerged as a competitive force in the global VOD industry — delivering digital content, and establishing a branded presence in more than 30 international markets, a combined 256,000 subscribers across YouTube and Amazon Prime Video, as well as more than 1.1 million monthly active viewers globally.

The acquisition expands Cinedigm’s OTT video customer base, which achieved over 370% year-over-year growth in ad-supported user base across linear and ad-supported VOD platforms in 2018 alone.

Cinedigm will continue to distribute Viewster Anime as a standalone brand, featuring films and series from Japan.

Acquired content includes movies such as Jin-Roh: The Wolf BrigadeFist Of The North Star, and Galaxy Express 999, Street Fighter II: The Animated Movie and Night On The Galactic Railroad, as well as series such as “Street Fighter II: The Animated Series,” “Mazinger Edition Z: The Impact!,” “Gunslinger Girl,” “GATE,” and “Food Wars,” among many others.

 

Cinedigm Bows Asian OTT Service ‘Hallypop’ on Samsung Smart TVs

Cinedigm Jan. 31 expanded its OTT video partnership with Samsung, adding Asian culture platform Hallypop and fact-focused Docurama on Samsung’s TV Plus video service.

The services join CONtv and Dove Channel, which both launched on the TV Plus platform in November 2018.

TV Plus is Samsung’s video service, which provides access to a variety of free streaming channels. It does not require a subscription fee, account set-up, or credit card info to access.

Hallypop programming includes K-Pop variety show, “Inkigayo,” featuring appearances and performances by BTS, Big Bang, Ikon, Girls Generation, and 2NE, among others; “Running Man,” pitting K-Pop and K-Drama stars against each other in reality-TV missions; interactive music series, “After School Club,” which uses social media to connect with K-Pop, including Q&A sessions, song requests, impromptu performances, and music videos, among other content.

“Cinedigm is proud to debut our newest digital-first network for the first time ever on Samsung’s TV Plus platform,” Erick Opeka, president of Cinedigm Digital Networks, said in a statement.

Opeka said CONtv and Dove Channel have been well-received on the TV Plus platform.

“Whether it’s Hallypop’s immersive Asian culture content or Docurama’s roster of documentaries and series, our networks appeal to a broad range of tastes and interests, and offer something for everyone to enjoy,” he said.

Cinedigm recently disclosed it has more than 102,000 paid subscribers for its OTT services.

 

 

 

Cinedigm OTT Video Channels Top 102,000 Subscribers, 2.4M AVOD Viewers

Home entertainment distributor Cinedigm announced several milestones for its portfolio of over-the-top video services – including an estimated 2.4 million monthly active ad-supported viewers and 102,000 active subscribers.

The Los Angeles-based distributor’s OTT channels, which include Dove Channel, CONtv, Docurama, CombatGo and Wham Network, offer nearly 12,000 hours of movie, television and live entertainment.

Pending services include Korean, Chinese and South East Asian pop culture network HallyPop and Bambu, offering Chinese action movies, serial dramas, romantic comedies, sci-fi, horror, as well as music and reality series to American audiences.

Cinedigm said it facilitated channel launches across 10 new distribution partners over the last two quarters, including Dish Network, Sling TV, Comcast Xfinity, Samsung TV Plus, Xumo, Pluto TV, Sinclair’s Stirr, Vizio Watch Free TV, and The Roku Channel, representing a total base of more than 126 million customers and devices.

“Our accomplishments in the last few months demonstrate Cinedigm’s vision of effectively delivering premium OTT entertainment content globally, no matter the device or business model,” Erick Opeka, president of Cinedigm Digital Networks, said in a statement.

Opeka said the company would continue to focus on launching new channels, investing in technology, growing the user base, monetizing ad-supported offerings and expanding its footprint of addressable devices.

Indeed, Cinedigm OTT services achieved 370% year-over-year growth in ad-supported user base across linear and ad-supported VOD platforms. Achieved over 205% quarter-over-quarter growth in connected television ad-requests. Grew content library by 6,200 film and television assets – more than 116% year-over-year.

Grew total social media footprint to 857,000 followers across YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram.

Cinedigm also acquired ComicBlitz, a subscription digital comic service, and announced the acquisition of Viewster, a pop-culture ad-supported streaming service. These acquisitions add more than 7,100 movie, television and digital publishing assets from more than 70 content partners.

It launched Matchpoint, an OTT platform and application framework that speeds time to market, while reducing the total operating expense for channel operators and content distributors.

 

Cinedigm Inks Content License Deal with China Lion

Cinedigm Jan. 23 announced it has entered into a non-exclusive content licensing agreement with China Lion to release more than 40 Chinese-language movies on the home entertainment distributor’s pending streaming channel, Bambu.

“This deal delivers dozens of very strong and well-known films, and perfectly complements the [China International TVCorporation]deal we recently announced, which was more TV episodic content,” Bill Sondheim, president of Cinedigm Entertainment Group and worldwide distribution, said in a statement. “We are particularly pleased that the titles are all subtitled, allowing for the best representation of the original film versions and adds to the authentic high-profile content foundation for Bambu.”

Bambu’s primary focus is Gen Z demo (ages 16-24), and Millennial viewers (ages 25-35). Together, those viewers represent more than 27% of the U.S. population.

“When we started China Lion back in 2010, Cinedigm was our first strategic home entertainment partner,” said China Lion CEO Yanming Jiang.

The titles expected on the launch of Bambu include:

 THE ARK OF MR CHOW

  • BATTLE OF MEMORIES
  • BEAUTIFUL ACCIDENT
  • BREAKUP BUDDIES
  • BUDDIES IN INDIA
  • BULLET VANISHES
  • COCK AND BULL (2016)
  • DETECTIVE CHINATOWN
  • THE DEVOTION OF SUSPECT X
  • DOUBLE TROUBLE
  • THE EX-FILE 3: THE RETURN OF THE EXES
  • EXPLOSION (2017)
  • FALL IN LOVE LIKE A STAR
  • FLEET OF TIME (aka BACK IN TIME)
  • A FOOL
  • FOR A FEW BULLETS
  • FOREVER YOUNG (2015)
  • THE GOLDEN ERA
  • GO AWAY MR TUMOR
  • GOODBYE MR LOSER
  • I BELONGED TO YOU
  • A JOURNEY THROUGH TIME WITH ANTHONY
  • THE LAST WOMEN STANDING
  • LET’S GET MARRIED
  • LOBSTER COP
  • LOST AND LOVE
  • MR DONKEY
  • MR SIX
  • MY LUCKY STAR
  • NAMIYA
  • THE NEW YEAR’S EVE OF OLD LEE
  • NEW YORK, NEW YORK (2016)
  • ONLY YOU (2015)
  • OOLONG COURTYARD: KUNG FU SCHOOL
  • OUR TIME WILL COME
  • SO I MARRIED AN ANTI-FAN
  • SO YOUNG
  • SO YOUNG 2: NEVER GONE
  • SWEET SIXTEEN (2016)
  • TILL THE END OF THE WORLD
  • THE VIRAL FACTOR
  • THE WASTED TIME
  • THE WITNESS (2015)
  • WOMEN WHO FLIRT

The deal follows Cinedigm’s recently-announced partnership with China International TVCorporationto bring more than 500 hours of Chinese content to the U.S. through Bambu, including “Nirvana in Fire,” TV ratings hit in China in 2015; documentary A Bite of China; “Journey to the West,” the most-watched show in Chinese television history, and current series, “The Advisors Alliance” and “Diamond Lover.”

A partnership with Youku to distribute 30 original Chinese feature filmsin North America on all platforms including Bambu, digital, DVD and Blu-ray Disc, and across all OTT platforms, with a primary focus on major streaming platforms and niche outlets.

A content licensing agreement with Starrise Media Holdings Limited to release several Starrise productions on Bambu. The titles have not yet been announced.

Home Entertainment 2018 Year-in-Review

The home entertainment industry was busy in 2018 in the shadow of ongoing major media mergers, as studios and distributors rejigger business models to reflect changing consumer habits domestically and worldwide. Here’s our annual recap of the year in home entertainment,  as covered in Media Play News.

 

January

  • DEG: The Digital Entertainment Group announced that home entertainment spending in 2017 increased 5.26% to $20.5 billion, from $19.5 billion 2016. As expected, gains came largely from digital (streaming video and transactional VOD), with total digital spending up nearly 20% to $13.7 billion.
  • Ron Sanders, longtime home entertainment chief, added president of worldwide distribution for the entire Warner motion picture group to his duties as part of broader studio restructuring.
  • Rollout of premium video-on-demand (PVOD) officially died after the CFO of the country’s largest theatrical chain said discussions with studios remained at an impasse. Speaking at Citi 2018 Global TMT West Conference in Las Vegas, AMC Entertainment CFO Craig Ramsey suggested negotiations with studios had cooled and that there was “no consensus” on PVOD.
  • Netflix said it added a record 8.3 million net subscribers in the fourth quarter of 2017 (ended Dec. 31) to finish the year with more than 117 million subs, including 110 million paid subs.
  • Two services emerged selling movie tickets via monthly subscription — a business model predicated on infrequent use. MoviePass, the New York-based service headed by Mitch Lowe, former CEO of Redbox, enables subs access to one theatrical movie per day for a $9.95 monthly fee, excluding 3D and in-theater dining. Cinemark, which operates nearly 6,000 screens in the United States and Latin America, launched Movie Club, an $8.99 service providing two monthly tickets. The service, unlike MoviePass, allows users to roll over unused tickets and grants a 20% discount on concessions.
  • Consulting firm Deloitte reported 2018 began with about 375 million SVOD subscribers worldwide — a tally projected to increase further as traditional pay-TV operators expand over-the-top video platforms.
  • Flixster Video shut down its website and discontinued all related operations in the United States. The site advised users to try other streaming video options such as Vudu.com and Movies Anywhere.
  • Sony Pictures Entertainment rebranded its ad-supported Crackle streaming service to Sony Crackle.
  • Hulu, the over-the-top video service co-owned by Disney, Comcast, Time Warner and Fox, ended 2017 with more than 17 million subscribers.
  • 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray emerged as a packaged-media star in 2017, Sony’s Victor Matsuda, chair of the Blu-ray Disc Association’s global promotions committee, told an industry gathering at CES 2018. “Hollywood really got behind the new format,” Matsuda said.
  • Warner’s It was the top selling DVD/Blu-ray for January, according to NPD VideoScan.

 

February

  • Sony Pictures placed Keith Le Goy, president of distribution for Sony Pictures Television, in charge of the home entertainment division, replacing Man Jit Singh, who held the position for four years.
  • Veteran entertainment executive Liz West, VP of global publicity at the Walt Disney Co., became EVP of marketing communications for international theatrical marketing and worldwide home entertainment at Paramount Pictures — a newly created position.
  • Amazon appointed Jennifer Salke to the position of president of Amazon Studios, replacing Roy Price, who resigned in 2017 following sexual harassment allegations. Salke, who headed NBC Universal since 2011, was responsible for development of current programming
  • Amdocs, a provider of solutions to communications and media companies, acquired Vubiquity, a provider of premium content services and technology solutions, in a $224 million deal.
  • Facing an underperforming film slate, Paramount Pictures jumped at the chance to offload sci-fi drama The Cloverfield Paradox to Netflix, Viacom CEO Bob Bakish told analysts on the media company’s fiscal call.
  • Subscription streaming video service HBO Now increased its subscriber base to 5 million, up from 2 million a year earlier.
  • Redbox filed litigation in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles against The Walt Disney Co., alleging the company’s direct-to-consumer streaming strategy aimed at blocking the kiosk vendor from reselling Disney’s packaged-media digital copy codes.
  • Theatrical ticket subscription service MoviePass topped more than 2 million subscribers, with CEO Mitch Lowe predicting 5 million subs by the end of the year.
  • Disney’s Coco was the top selling DVD/Blu-ray for February, according to NPD VideoScan.

 

March

  • Digital movie collection service Movies Anywhere added FandangoNow as its fifth digital retail partner, joining Amazon Prime Video, Google Play, iTunes and Vudu.
  • Walt Disney Parks and Resorts chairman Bob Chapek assumed additional responsibility for all of Disney’s consumer products operations globally, including licensing and Disney stores, as chairman of the new Parks, Experiences and Consumer Products business segment.
  • Carrie Dieterich, SVP of strategic initiatives at the Entertainment Merchants Association, announced her retirement after 24 years with the home entertainment trade association.
  • Netflix said it expects to generate $15 billion in user fees in 2018 — almost twice the $8 billion it will spend on original content co-founder/CEO Reed Hastings said at a corporate tech event in Los Angeles.
  • Amazon Prime Video generated 26 million viewers for 19 original programs in early 2017, including 5 million for top shows such as “The Man in the High Castle,” “Transparent,” “Mozart in the Jungle” and ‘The Grand Tour.”
  • Tower Records and Video founder Russ Solomon, one of the most important retail figures in the home video industry, died March 4 at age 92 of an apparent heart attack while watching the Academy Awards.
  • A TiVo survey of 3,000 consumers found usage of Redbox increased from 10% of respondents in the third quarter to 12.5% in the fourth in 2017.
  • Lucasfilm announced that Jon Favreau would executive produce and write a live-action “Star Wars” television series for the Walt Disney Company’s streaming video service, which is expected to bow in late 2019.
  • Indie distributor Shout! Factory partnered with China’s Ace Film HK Co. to acquire 91-year-old Roger Corman’s New Horizons Picture catalog of 270 movies and TV series. Known as “The Pope of Pop Cinema,” Corman is responsible for such titles as Death Race 2000, Piranha, Black Scorpion, Humanoids from the Deep and the 1960 Little Shop of Horrors, among others.
  • Amazon Studios closed an exclusive first-look deal with Oscar-winning filmmaker Kenneth Lonergan, who won an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay and was nominated for Best Director for Manchester by the Sea, distributed by Amazon.
  • Billionaire entrepreneur Wayne Huizenga, who propelled Blockbuster Video into a national brand, among other businesses, died March 22 at age 80 following a long battle with cancer.
  • Netflix added a record 7.4 million new subscribers in the first quarter (ended March 31) — topping Wall Street estimates of 6.5 million. The service added 5.4 million subs internationally, compared with 1.96 million (1.45 million forecast) in the United States.
  • The first quarter of 2018 yielded positive results for studios due in part to top theatrical titles from the end of 2017 hitting retail channels.
  • Spurred by packaged-media and digital revenue from Oscar-winner La La Land, Power Rangers, Tyler Perry’s Boo 2! A Madea Halloween and Wonder, Lionsgate reported a $67 million increase in home entertainment revenue for fiscal year 2018, ended March 31.
  • Limited largely to catalog releases, MGM Studios Home Entertainment reported global revenue of $19.1 million for the quarter ended March 31, down 40% ($12.8 million) from revenue of $31.9 million for the previous-year period.
  • Disney’s Thor: Ragnarok was the top selling DVD/Blu-ray for March, according to NPD VideoScan.

 

April

  • Disney and subsidiaries Lucasfilm and Marvel Studios filed an amended claim in the U.S. District in Los Angeles alleging that Redbox is infringing copyright law selling digital codes to Disney movies obtained from the studios’ packaged-media releases.
  • Theatrical ticket subscription service MoviePass and corporate parent Helios and Matheson Analytics acquired movie information service Moviefone from Oath, a Verizon subsidiary that has taken an ownership stake in MoviePass and will continue to sell Moviefone’s digital ad inventory.
  • The Walt Disney Co. and Twitter announced an agreement to create live content and advertising opportunities across the entire Disney portfolio on the Twitter platform.
  • IHS Markit announced that global digital pay-TV subscriptions, including cable, satellite, telecom and online TV, exceeded 1 billion for the first time in 2017. The milestone comes despite ongoing growth of over-the-top (OTT) subscription video services such as Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime Video. SVOD services, which continue to add three subs for every new pay-TV sub.
  • Fox’s The Greatest Showman was the top selling DVD/Blu-ray for April, according to NPD VideoScan. Disney’s Star Wars: The Last Jedi takes over as the top seller for the year to date.

 

May

  • Warner Bros. promoted longtime executive Jim Wuthrich to president of worldwide home entertainment and games. He reports to Ron Sanders, president of worldwide theatrical distribution and home entertainment.
  • GameStop announced the appointment of Daniel DeMatteo as interim CEO following the sudden resignation of CEO Michael Mauler for personal reasons.
  • Netflix CCO Ted Sarandos told the MoffettNathanson Media & Communications Summit in New York that the service’s subscribers won’t miss Disney original movies, which are migrating to Disney’s pending direct-to-consumer service.
  • New research from Parks Associates showed that 6% of U.S. broadband households are likely to subscribe to an online TV service within the next 12 months, which would more than double the number of current subscribers.
  • Cinedigm partnered with Gatherer Entertainment, an entertainment hub dedicated to providing curated content to women in the 35-54 demo, with hopes of launching the first-ever women’s lifestyle subscription streaming video service.
  • Hulu, which announced it surpassed 20 million subscribers in the United States, signed a license deal with DreamWorks Animation, becoming the exclusive streaming home for future and catalog DWA movies starting in 2019.
  • Amazon announced it exceeded 100 million Prime members globally since launching the loyalty platform 13 years ago. Prime membership includes free access to Prime Video, among other services.
  • Mixed martial arts league UFC and The Walt Disney Co. announced a multiyear media rights agreement for 15 live UFC events to appear exclusively on new streaming service ESPN+, as well as across a variety of ESPN’s television, social and digital platforms, in English and Spanish.
  • Trans World Entertainment Corp. lost $8.1 million for the quarter ended May 5, which was 56% higher than the $5.2 million loss reported in the previous-year period. Revenue dropped nearly 5% to $96.6 million. The company cited much of the loss on continued challenges in its f.y.e. (For Your Entertainment) mall-based home entertainment retail chain.
  • Disney’s Black Panther was the top selling DVD/Blu-ray for May, according to NPD VideoScan.

June

  • A federal judge June 12 gave the green light to AT&T Inc.’s $85 billion acquisition of Time Warner Inc., rejecting a Department of Justice argument that such a union would stifle competition and hurt pay-TV consumers by costing them more money to stream movies and TV shows. Time Warner was subsequently renamed WarnerMedia and folded into the telecom’s media business segment headed by John Stankey. The deadline for completing the deal had already been extended to June 21, after originally being set for October 2017.
  • Looking to shake up its internal management structure, Hulu hired a new chief technology officer, its first chief data officer and realigned the subscription streaming video platform into four operating segments, among other changes. Notable in the reorganization was the departure of chief content officer Joe Stillerman and Tim Connolly, SVP of partnerships and distribution.
  • AT&T announced plans for its new AT&T Watch TV service, a package of Turner channels available for free to AT&T wireless subscribers and $15 on other platforms.
  • The Entertainment AIDS Alliance (EAA) changed its name to the Entertainment Aid Alliance to signify expansion into other charitable endeavors. The organization also added new leadership, including EAA president Jordan von Haslow, who took over the position in January from longtime president Sue Procko.
  • Sony Pictures Television revamped internal operations to combine networks, distribution and home entertainment into single business units operating under separate territorial management and reporting to Keith Le Goy, president of worldwide TV distribution at Sony Pictures Entertainment.
  • Redbox rolled out 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray rentals across more than 2,500 kiosks in six test markets: Los Angeles, Seattle, Austin, Detroit, Miami, and New York City. The UHD discs cost $2.50 per night, 50 cents higher than the rental rate for regular Blu-ray Discs (DVDs are $1.75).
  • In a potential blow to MoviePass, AMC Theatres bowed AMC Stubs A-List, which gives subscribers access to screenings and movie reservations at any AMC location in any format three times per week for $19.95 per month.
  • Parks Associates estimates the number of global households with an over-the-top video service subscription will exceed 265 million by 2022, spearheaded by Netflix and Amazon Prime Video.
  • The S&P Dow Jones Indices added Netflix to the S&P 100, replacing Monsanto. The subscription streaming pioneer with more than 125 million global subscribers recently saw its market value rival Comcast and Disney.
  • The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that states can levy a sales tax on e-commerce merchants regardless of a physical presence in the state, overturning a 1992 decision. The prohibition on taxing out-of-state e-commerce reportedly cost states $13.4 billion in revenue last year.
  • Former president Barack Obama and Michelle Obama entered into a multiyear agreement to produce films and series with Netflix, according to the streaming service. The Obamas have established Higher Ground Productions as the entity under which they will produce content for Netflix.
  • Apple signed a multiyear content partnership with Oprah Winfrey, “the esteemed producer, actress, talk show host, philanthropist and CEO of OWN,” the tech giant announced.
  • Seeking to significantly upgrade the Starz brand globally, corporate parent Lionsgate licensed the premium channel’s app to YouTube TV and Hulu.
  • The Walt Disney Co. shuffled executives and at the end of June shuttered animation division Disneytoon Studios, based in Glendale.
  • Digital continued to drive consumers to spend more money on home entertainment, with total spending up 9% for the first half of 2018 from the first six months of 2017, according to the quarterly update from DEG: The Digital Entertainment Group.
  • Lionsgate’s I Can Only Imagine was the top selling DVD/Blu-ray for June, according to NPD VideoScan.

 

July

  • Apple added longtime BBC Films executive Joe Oppenheimer to its international content development unit. Oppenheimer reports to Jay Hunt, the former BBC and Channel 4 executive Apple hired last October to head it international TV unit.
  • WarnerMedia CEO John Stankey told a company meeting that HBO has to increase “hours of engagement” in a consumer market he says is driven by portable devices that capture their attention “every 15 minutes.”
  • MoviePass parent company Helios and Matheson Analytics, after seeing its stock price drop to record lows below 20 cents per share, unveiled a series of financial moves intended to shore up the service’s loss-leader business model, which lets moviegoers see one non-premium movie a day for $9.95 monthly fee.
  • A new agreement with Warner Bros. gives Redbox rental kiosks access to the studio’s Blu-rays and DVDs on street date, rather than the week- and month- long delays of previous deals. The agreement also maintains new-release and catalog availability via Redbox On Demand at first release.
  • Verizon ended Go90, the ad-supported mobile-centric streaming video app launched in 2015 with much fanfare and hundreds of millions of dollars in investment.
  • Despite the popularity of Netflix, Amazon and Hulu, nearly half the country isn’t willing to pay for a video subscription streaming service, according to a new study from Parrot Analytics.
  • Streaming TV pioneer Roku introduced “Audience Marketplace,” allowing advertising buyers and sellers to more effectively target audiences on the Roku platform in the United States, according to the company.
  • Struggling toy chain Toys “R” Us — once a significant player in the DVD/Blu-ray Disc and video game sellthrough market — closed the last of its U.S. stores.
  • Adam Sandler and Jennifer Aniston, who teamed in Just Go With It, announce plans to reunite in Murder Mystery, due on Netflix in 2019.
  • A new agreement with Viacom gives Hulu exclusive streaming rights to series such as “Daria,” “Nathan for You,” “My Super Sweet 16” and “New Edition Story.”
  • Reese Witherspoon’s Hello Sunshine production company announces it is bowing two reality-based series on a branded channel via AT&T’s DirecTV Now and U-verse platforms.
  • Olympic Gold medalist Oscar de la Hoya’s Golden Boy Promotions signed a partnership with Facebook to bring ad-supported live boxing to the social media giant’s Watch streaming platform.
  • Subscription VOD service CBS All Access extended an agreement to stream all “NFL on CBS” telecasts through the 2022 season.
  • The Justice Department announced plans to appeal the federal court ruling giving the go-ahead to AT&T’s acquisition of Warner.
  • Warner’s Rampage was the top selling DVD/Blu-ray for July, according to NPD VideoScan.

 

August

  • Shareholders of The Walt Disney Co. and 21st Century Fox approved Disney’s acquisition of Fox’s entertainment assets, in a $71.3 billion exchange of stock and cash. The merger is expected to be completed in the first half of 2019.
  • Warner Bros. beta-launches “DC Universe,” a first-of-its-kind subscription streaming video service affording access to exclusive content and experiences “not available anywhere else.”
  • Heather Schuster, head of unscripted content at Amazon Studios, left the company after less than 12 months on the job, reportedly following an internal probe into her corporate behavior.
  • Netflix CFO David Wells announces plans to step down after helping the company choose his successor. The search will include both internal and external candidates. Wells joined Netflix in 2004 and has served as CFO since 2010.
  • Disney CEO Bob Iger announces the pending Disney streaming video service would focus on incorporating core brands, including Marvel, Star Wars and Pixar, in an effort to complement, and to a lesser extent, compete with services such as Netflix.
  • The Entertainment Merchants Association, MovieLabs and DEG: The Digital Entertainment Group formed the Digital Supply Chain Alliance to improve cooperation among the organizations’ members “in service of improved efficiency, standards adoption and the sharing of best practices.”
  • Microsoft Movies & TV became the sixth retail affiliate of the Movies Anywhere movie ownership rights locker service, allowing film fans to sync their Microsoft account to Movies Anywhere and centralize their digital movies purchased from Microsoft alongside those purchased from other connected retailers.
  • Netflix reportedly began testing streaming video ads of original content to select subscribers. The ads appear during binging sessions and other content viewing. Netflix said the house ads could be skipped and underscore the platform’s desire to expedite a user’s streaming experience with recommended content suggestions based on user data.
  • Sony Pictures Entertainment was reported to be looking for a fiscal partner to help it expand Crackle.com, the ad-supported streaming video service it acquired in 2006 for $65 million.
  • The NPD Group’s “Entertainment Trends in America” report is released, estimating that 17% of U.S. consumers relied solely on subscription video-on-demand services such as Netflix, Hulu and Amazon to view video content in the 12-month period ended March 2018, up from 11% in 2017. Meanwhile, 24% of consumers rely only on transactional methods — buying or purchasing content on physical discs or in digital formats, while 32% use a combination of transactions and SVOD.
  • Go90, Verizon’s short-lived attempt at over-the-top video targeting millennials on wireless devices, cost the company $997 million. The telecom revealed the pre-tax charges, which included $339 million in severance charges, in its quarterly fiscal results.
  • Former DreamWorks Animation CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg’s WndrCo holding company raised $1 billion in initial funding for “NewTV,” an app that aims to launch in 2019.
  • Shout! Factory formed a distribution partnership with Sesame Workshop for the “Sesame Street” home entertainment library.
  • Media measurement company Comscore announced it will bow a pilot program dubbed “campaign ratings” aimed at tracking audiences across linear TV and digital platforms with reliable audience demographics.
  • Cinedigm Entertainment Group renewed its home video distribution deal with the Crown Media Family Networks, parent company of the Hallmark Channel, Hallmark Movies & Mysteries, and Hallmark Movies Now.
  • Disney’s Avengers: Infinity War was the top selling DVD/Blu-ray for August, according to NPD VideoScan.

 

September

  • A federal judge granted the Walt Disney Co.’s request for a preliminary injunction against Redbox selling digital codes to Disney movies, ruling that Disney’s amended language accompanying its packaged-media combo packs sufficiently prohibits private parties from selling copyrighted content without permission.
  • Speaking at the Goldman Sachs 27th Annual Communacopia confab in New York, Bob Bakish, CEO of corporate parent Viacom, said Paramount is a very different place today — thanks in part to a trio of theatrical hits and increased television content production, among other initiatives.
  • WarnerMedia announced plans to launch an over-the-top video service featuring Warner Bros. and HBO catalog content, in addition to Turner Sports fare.
  • Helios and Matheson Analytics, corporate parent of fiscally challenged theatrical ticket subscription service MoviePass, sought to authorize a second reverse-stock split in another attempt to raise its stock price to meet the Nasdaq minimum of $1 per share.
  • Warner officially launches the DC Universe Sept. 15 — Batman Day — anchored by superhero series “Titans,” based on the Teen Titans comic book.
  • In a market increasingly dominated by subscription streaming, consumers still like to buy movies and TV shows on disc and digital formats, according to a report from Nielsen.
  • New consumer research from Leichtman Research Group found that 69% of all U.S. households have a subscription video-on-demand (SVOD) service from Netflix, Amazon Prime, and/ or Hulu — up from 52% in 2015. Among those that have an SVOD service, 63% have more than one of these services — up from 38% in 2015. Overall, 43% of U.S. households now have more than one SVOD service, an increase from 20% in 2015.
  • DEG: The Digital Entertainment Group announced the incoming board of directors for its 22nd year. Board officers, elected to a two-year term, include Comcast Cable’s Matt Strauss as chair; HBO’s Sofia Chang as vice chair, Paramount’s Bob Buchi as CFO, and Warner’s Jim Wuthrich as secretary.
  • BritBox, the 18-month-old subscription streaming video service launched in the U.S. by BBC Studios and ITV, topped 400,000 monthly subscribers and is projected to reach 500,000 members by next March, according to BBC Studios CEO Tim Davie.
  • Borrowing a page from its Amazon Channels, Amazon launched Storefronts — a platform giving Prime members access to more than 20,000 small and medium-sized retailers selling on Amazon. In 2017, more than 300,000 U.S.-based small and medium-sized businesses started selling through Amazon.
  • The FandangoNow on-demand video service began offering Binge Bundles, a rental initiative offering multiple titles from franchises in more than 100 themed collections.
  • Netflix added nearly 7 million global subscribers for the quarter ended Sept. 30, including 1 million in the United States — beating company projections and upping its global subscriber base to 137 million.
  • Cinedigm’s Docurama streaming services launched on the Roku Channel.
  • Streaming media device pioneer Roku lost $11.7 million in the quarter ended Sept. 30, widened from a loss of $7.9 million during the previous-year period. Revenue increased 39% to $173.4 million.
  • Paramount Home Media Distribution’s revenue of $157 million for the quarter ended Sept. 30 was down 17% from revenue of $190 million in the previous-year period. Domestic revenue from sales of physical and digital movies and TV shows reached $103 million, compared with $118.5 million last year. International sales totaled $54 million, down 22%. The studio attributed the drop in part to timing of releases and product mix. For the fiscal year, sales of physical and digital content topped $622 million, down about 27% from $849 million a year ago.
  • MGM Studios revenue was $21.8 million for the quarter ended Sept. 30, up 30% from the previous-year period. Television program home entertainment revenue increased 26% to $26.9 million.
  • Consumer spending on home entertainment in the third quarter of 2018 rose 15% compared with the prior-year period, to an estimated $5.7 billion according to DEG: The Digital Entertainment Group. For the first nine months of the year, spending was at nearly $17 billion, an 11% year-over-year gain.
  • Universal’s Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom was the top selling DVD/Blu-ray for September, according to NPD VideoScan.

 

October

  • New data from Digital TV Research projected 1.877 billion combined global pay-TV and subscription streaming video subscribers by 2023 — up 37% from 1.372 billion at the end of 2017. SVOD subs will more than double, but traditional pay-TV will add just 94 million subs.
  • Walmart formed a strategic entertainment joint venture with Eko, a developer of interactive video technology. The initiative — dubbed W*E Interactive Ventures — expands Walmart’s entertainment ecosystem beyond its retail website, Vudu digital movie service and a new eBook platform.
  • After losing out to Disney for the purchase of Fox’s studio assets, Comcast emerged victorious in its efforts to gain control of U.K. satellite TV operator Sky. Comcast outbid 21st Century Fox with a $40 billion offer for outstanding Sky shares in an auction mandated by British regulators.
  • Redbox hired Chris Yates as GM for its Redbox On Demand digital video store, which launched in late 2017.
  • Lionsgate signed Ron Schwartz to a new long-term agreement as president of Lionsgate Worldwide Home Entertainment and promoted marketing executive Amanda Kozlowski to EVP of home entertainment and digital distribution marketing.
  • The Walt Disney Co.’s direct-to-consumer and international segment announced that subscription streaming video service ESPN+ surpassed 1 million paying subscribers since its April launch. The $4.99 monthly service ($49.99 per year) represents Disney’s first foray into branded standalone OTT video.
  • Roku resumed sales of its streaming media devices in Mexico following a favorable court ruling. Roku had been banned since the summer of 2017 after allegations its devices enabled third-party hackers to create apps to pirate content.
  • Satellite radio operator SiriusXM acquired streaming music operator Pandora Media in an all-stock transaction valued at about $3.5 billion. The transaction, which is expected to close in early 2019, creates the world’s largest audio entertainment company, with more than $7 billion in expected pro-forma revenue in 2018.
  • Sony Electronics announced a collaboration with software company Connekt to let owners of select Sony Smart TVs and Blu-ray Disc players buy products directly through the television.
  • Walmart-owned Vudu.com signed a deal with MGM Studios for original content to be made available on the transactional VOD platform’s ad-supported “Movies on Us” service. The deal includes exclusive North American access to original episodic series based on MGM intellectual property.
  • BBC Studios Los Angeles and Lionsgate Television signed a first-look agreement to co-develop original scripted content for the U.S. market based on the BBC catalog.
  • Lucasfilm begins production of “The Mandalorian,” the first “Star Wars” live-action series previously announced to be produced by Jon Favreau for Disney’s streaming service launching in 2019.
  • Disney’s Ant-Man and The Wasp was the top selling DVD/Blu-ray for October, according to NPD VideoScan.

 

November

  • Disney CEO Bob Iger said he wanted to expedite the home video window following the studio’s strong home entertainment results. “The home video window continues to be quite important to us,” Iger said. The pending Disney SVOD service is given a name, Disney+, and additional programming will include a second “Star Wars” series, based on Rogue One‘s Cassian Andor (played by Diego Luna), and a series based on Marvel’s Loki (played by Tom Hiddleston). Disney is also producing a live-action version of Lady and the Tramp for the service.
  • DEG: The Digital Entertainment Group presented its second annual Hedy Lamarr Award for Innovation in Entertainment Technology to Emblematic Group CEO Nonny de la Peña.
  • During the Nov. 6 4K Ultra HD Summit, DEG presented its inaugural Vanguard Award to Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Christopher Nolan .
  • Digital TV Research estimates revenue from subscription streaming video services such as Netflix and other over-the-top video services would top $35 billion this year — up nearly 30% from revenue of $25.04 billion in 2017.
  • Movies Anywhere celebrated its first birthday by touting its 6 million registered users, who have digital collections totaling 150 million movies, resulting in more than 1 billion minutes viewed. Fans have streamed more than 35 million movies on more than 100 different devices.
  • The board of directors of Helios and Matheson Analytics approved a plan to spin off subsidiary MoviePass, the fiscally-challenged movie ticket subscription service.
  • Online mega-retailer Amazon selected New York City and Arlington, Va., as the locations for the company’s new co-headquarters. Amazon announced expectations to invest $5 billion and create more than 50,000 jobs across the two locations.
  • With Netflix sitting atop the global SVOD market with 137 million subscribers, co-founder and CEO Reed Hastings reiterated that the platform going forward would focus on paid subscribers rather than including new subscribers engaged in free trial service, which equates to about 7 million fewer subs.
  • The FilmStruck streaming service from Turner Classic Movies catering to rare, classic, foreign, arthouse and independent cinema, shut down. The service launched in 2016 and was exclusive online streaming home of the Criterion Collection in the United States. Owner WarnerMedia also shuttered Korean-themed movie SVOD service DramaFever as part of efforts to consolidate its over-the top video strategy following its acquisition by AT&T. Criterion soon announced plans to start its own standalone streaming service in Spring 2019, which would also be available as an add-on to the pending WarnerMedia SVOD service.
  • AMC Networks completed the $59 million acquisition of all shares of common stock in home entertainment distributor RLJ Entertainment not owned by founder Robert L. Johnson. RLJE is now a privately-owned subsidiary of AMC Networks, with Johnson and his affiliates owning a 17% stake.
  • Reports indicate Apple is planning to launch an online TV service in more than 100 countries in the first half of 2019. The service would include original programming, in addition to third-party apps similar to Amazon Channels in the United States, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom, according to com. Apple also announced Steve Carell would join Reese Witherspoon and Jennifer Aniston for its upcoming streaming service’s drama series about morning TV news.
  • Netflix, Amazon Prime and Hulu, in that order, topped Parks Associates list of the top 10 subscription over-the-top video services in the U.S. market. Rounding out the top 10 were, in order, HBO Now, Starz, MLB.TV, Showtime, CBS All Access, Sling TV and DirecTV Now.
  • Cinedigm added the martial arts platform Combat Go by JungoTV and the e-sports network Wham as linear offerings on the free, ad-supported Roku Channel. Both digital channels join Cinedigm networks The Dove Channel, CONtv and Docurama. Wham is also streaming on the Pluto TV service.
  • TV Studios, a subsidiary of Viacom’s MTV, partners with Facebook to reboot reality TV trailblazer “The Real World” for three new seasons debuting in spring 2019.
  • Cinedigm announced a partnership with Chinese streaming service Youku to distribute 30 original Chinese feature films in North America on all platforms including digital, DVD and Blu-ray, and OTT, with a primary focus on major streaming platforms and niche outlets.
  • Digital retailer Google Play Movies & TV will automatically upgrade customers’ past movie purchases to 4K when available from participating studios, even if they were originally bought in SD or HD. Google Play also announced a price drop for 4K movies.
  • Trans World Entertainment Corp., parent of f.y.e. (For Your Entertainment), had a net loss of $14 million for the quarter ended Nov. 3, compared with a net loss of $8 million a year ago. Revenue dipped $1 million to $90.8 million.
  • Consumer foot traffic to brick-and-mortar retail stores on Thanksgiving and Black Friday resulted in a combined 1% decline for the two-day period compared to last year, with a 1.7% decline in traffic on Black Friday versus 2017, according to new data from ShopperTrak.
  • Disney’s Incredibles 2 was the top selling DVD/Blu-ray for November, according to NPD VideoScan. In addition, Avengers: Infinity War moved into the top spot for the year-to-date top sellers, bumping Star Wars: The Last Jedi, which had held the spot for seven months. Disney titles topped the monthly chart six times and hold five spots in the yearly top 10.

 

December

  • Digital movie collection service Movies Anywhere added Comcast’s Xfinity Digital Store as its seventh digital retail partner and the first pay-TV provider to join.
  • The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Dec. 6 heard oral arguments in the Justice Department’s appeal of the AT&T/Time Warner merger. Justices expressed skepticism over the government’s concerns about the economic impacts of the merger.
  • With 70% of Netflix programming streamed through the TV, the service is seeking to turn more of its 130 million global subscribers toward using its mobile platform. The SVOD pioneer is testing lower-priced subscriptions for mobile users in select markets, including Asia.
  • Netflix topped global spending on original and licensed content with more than $12 billion in 2018. Following the mergers of Comcast/Sky and Disney/Fox, two of every five dollars spent on content in the United States will be spent by these four companies alone, according to new data from Ampere Analysis.
  • DirecTV announced plans to roll out a proprietary streaming media device in 2019 that would enable consumers to access online TV service DirecTV Now using their own broadband or high-speed Internet connectivity. The device, which would be similar to a Roku or Apple TV, would help DirecTV reduce subscriber acquisition costs typically associated with the installation of pay-TV service.
  • Cinedigm is launching Matchpoint, a managed-service technology platform that “enables content distributors, OTT service operators, Web publishers, and OEMs to efficiently and cost-effectively create compelling OTT and media subscription services.”
  • YouTube began offering catalog studio movies for free, including titles such as Legally Blonde, Rocky IV, Zookeeper and The Terminator, among others. The ad-supported streams appear alongside new releases promoted to buy or rent on YouTube.com and Google Play.
  • Still smarting from its $1 billion write-down of the short-lived Go90 video app, Verizon is embracing high-band 5G spectrum, which claims to offer wireless network speeds 100 times faster than the current 4G spectrum, by helping to market third-party over-the-top video services — similar to what Amazon Channels does.
  • Amazon Studios acquired rights to The Fighting Shirley Chisholm, with Oscar-winning actress Viola Davis set to co-produce and star in the title role as the first black woman elected to Congress. Chisholm served from 1969 to 1983. Separately, Amazon Studios reached an agreement with Jason Blum’s indie Blumhouse Television studio for eight darkly-themed feature-length thrillers to be released on Amazon Prime Video.
  • Hulu and Funimation, a subsidiary of Sony Pictures Television, announced a multiyear partnership and output deal to significantly expand Hulu’s anime collection beginning in 2019.
  • Amazon and Sinclair Broadcast Group are reportedly in early discussions about a joint bid to acquire the New York Yankees’ YES regional sports TV network.
  • Comcast Cable began enabling Xfinity X1 subscribers to stream 4K video content on a compatible HDTV in their home.
  • The Federal Trade Commission issued an alert to Netflix subscribers about an online phishing scam that attempts to extract personal information from unsuspecting subs, among other issues.
  • On the strength of live streaming three of the biggest sporting events in the world — Super Bowl LII, the PyeongChang Winter Olympics, and Spanish-language coverage of the FIFA World Cup  — NBC Sports Digital delivered its best year ever in 2018.
  • DC Universe, WarnerMedia’s superhero-centric subscription streaming video service, was made available on Amazon Fire TV.
  • AMC Theatres announced that its Stubs A-List subscription ticket service surpassed 600,000 subs since launching six months earlier. The nation’s largest theatrical chain had expected to reach 500,000 A-List members after 12 months.
  • The most popular shows on Netflix in the U.S. come from other companies, despite the online streaming giant’s push into original programming, according to a new report by online media company Recode.
  • Seeking to tap into apparent consumer demand for Spanish-language content from Spain in the United States, Spain’s public TV broadcaster, RTVE, is launching an over-the-top video service domestically, in Canada and Latin America.
  • Amazon announced a record-breaking holiday season, with more items ordered worldwide than ever before. The e-commerce behemoth said consumers shopped at record levels from a wide selection of products across every department. Best-selling products this season included all-new Echo Dot home speakers and Bose wireless headphones, among others.
  • Netflix is projected to pass Comcast-owned satellite pay-TV operator Sky in subscribers by the end of the year, according to new data from Ampere Analysis.

Cinedigm Continues Piecemeal Sale of Digital Projection Business

Before Cinedigm became a home entertainment distributor and over-the-top video provider, it marketed a proprietary brand of digital projections for theatrical exhibitors.

The company Dec. 19 announced it entered into an agreement for the sale of 125 digital cinema projection systems. The sale for an undisclosed amount represents another step in the monetization of the 3,724 projectors Cinedigm owns. The distributor previously sold 17 systems and expects to close the current sale by Jan. 15, 2019.

Cinedigm, which is majority owned by Chinese investors, at one time spearheaded an industry initiative to convert movie theaters from 35mm analog projectors to digital projection technology.

It installed digital projection systems for 12,688 theater screens, with 382 exhibitor partners in multiple territories worldwide. In total, 3,724 of those systems were owned by the Cinedigm, and 142 of such systems have been sold or are contracted for sale to date.

“We are evaluating international and domestic opportunities to monetize our additional owned projection systems and look forward to sharing more news on this front in the near future,” Gary Loffredo, president of digital cinema and general counsel, said in a statement.