Parks: 36% of Streaming Video Subs Stop/Start Multiple Services

A new Parks Associates report finds 36% of over-the-top video subscribers, roughly 32 million U.S. households, are “service hoppers,” defined as subs who switched between services and resubscribed to services multiple times in the previous 12 months. The report details the challenges in subscriber acquisition and retention and the latest developments in data and analytics used to improve business operations and better engage subscribers.

Dallas-based Parks finds that all methods where subs interact with OTT services, from subscription to platform usage, are rapidly diversifying. In the early market, households would subscribe directly via an OTT provider’s website, but the percentage of households subscribing directly via an OTT provider’s website declined from 41% to 29% between Q1 2020 and Q3 2021. Instead, households are taking multiple paths to video subscription, including through OTT aggregators, including Roku and Amazon Fire TV.

Subscribe HERE to the FREE Media Play News Daily Newsletter!

“Data collection and analysis offer new ways to attract and retain viewers, optimize revenue, and create new value,” Elizabeth Parks, president and CMO, Parks Associates, said in a statement. “Data allows vendors to identify subscribers at risk of churn and can even tag the ‘server hoppers’ who will jump in and out of services no matter what, so that providers do not waste resources chasing them in vain. Advanced data tools help companies make more informed decisions about the content and structure of their services and special offerings.”

Given the enhanced value of subscriber data, some content providers are seeking to re-establish control over their viewers — and the data about them — by not offering subscriptions via aggregators. In 2021, a substantial group of streaming households subscribed to a service via Amazon Prime Video Channels, but that percentage could drop in the future, as HBO and HBO Max were removed from the platform in September. Likewise, Disney+ is not available through major aggregators, and NBC recently announced it is moving many of its shows exclusively to Peacock and away from Hulu.

Deloitte Report: 84% of U.S. Consumers Spending More Time With Online, Rather Than In-Person Entertainment

The vast majority of U.S. consumers (84%) are spending more time with online, rather than in-person entertainment, according to Deloitte’s just released Digital Media Trends Fall Pulse Survey.

Meanwhile, more than 80% of U.S. respondents in the survey conducted in August 2021 said they remain concerned about COVID-19 variants, and about half (48%) said they spend more time on online entertainment versus six months ago.

Among other findings in the survey:

  • Both Boomers and Gen X still rank “watching TV shows or movies at home” as their favorite entertainment activity; “playing video games” is still ranked as Gen Z’s preferred form of entertainment.
  • “Churn and return” behavior is most common with younger generations, with almost half of millennials (47%) and 34% of Gen Z canceling and then re-subscribing to the same service later.
  • High cost and completing a TV show they signed up to watch are the top two reasons consumers canceled an SVOD service.
  • 65% of consumers are engaging with at least one social media service several times a day.
  • 65% of respondents are frequent gamers, playing at least once a week; on average, these frequent gamers play for around 12 hours a week.

 

Subscribe HERE to the FREE Media Play News Daily Newsletter!

The survey revealed that consumers are getting better at developing strategies to access online content while keeping their costs low. Among the findings:

  • 84% of respondents now pay for an SVOD service; the average household has four subscriptions — largely unchanged during the past year.
  • The churn rate — the number of people who have cancelled, or both added and cancelled, a paid SVOD service — has remained stable at about 38%, although it varies from service to service.
  • Many streaming video subscribers say they actively manage costs in some way, either by looking for deals or promotions, bundles, using friends’ or family members’ accounts, and other strategies.
  • Led by cost-sensitive and savvy millennials and Gen Zs, 65% of respondents reported using free ad-supported video services.

Parks: Netflix, Amazon, Hulu Dominate OTT Video Subscription Lengths

Sometimes it helps to be an industry disruptor, other times brand awareness carries the day.

Both apply to Netflix, Amazon Prime Video and Hulu, which rank as the top three subscription streaming video services when it comes to length of the typical subscription. New data from Parks Research found SVOD pioneer Netflix rates No. 1 with the average subscriber duration lasting about 48 months. That compared with 40 months for Prime Video and 30 months for Hulu.

Subscribe HERE to the FREE Media Play News Daily Newsletter!

The Dallas-based research firm found that 61% of OTT subscribers never join a service on impulse, and 50% never subscribe with plans to cancel shortly thereafter. With services like Netflix and Disney+ dropping free trials, subscribers look for SVOD plans for a long-term investment, according to Parks. For SVODs, this means content must be appealing enough to generate and sustain that interest. Indeed, about 30% of subs often join a service to watch a specific program. As a result, the search for desirable content holds the greatest importance, according to Parks.

Not only does desirable content and personalities prompt retention, but viewers are unlikely to churn from a service that they have a strong brand affinity for.

So when WarnerMedia launched HBO Max last year, the initial goal was to broaden the lineup of traditional edgy HBO shows with other marquee IP, including DC Entertainment and Max originals. The strategy mindset being that targeting a wide variety of interest groups would unify niche audiences under one streaming service.

Paramount+ has emulated this strategy, featuring its key properties and personalities heavily within the marketing that promises a “mountain of entertainment.” Disney, Pixar, Marvel, Lucasfilm, and National Geographic feature prominently on Disney+ as their streaming home, allowing the upstart SVOD to rapidly gain subscribers globally and become a contender to Netflix & Co.

Parks researcher Liam Gaughan found that upstart SVOD services being bundled together with competing and non-competing services have been successful at generating subscribers. In addition to the “Disney Bundle,” offering new subs access to Disney+, ESPN+ and Hulu for $13.99 monthly with ads ($19.99 without), Gaughan cited a previous bundling deal offering Apple TV+, CBS All-Access, and Showtime for $9.99. He said that content from Showtime and All Access enabled Apple users to try alternative programming and helped extend subscriptions.

“This was also a strategic move from ViacomCBS, who was able to introduce All-Access content to Apple users prior to the launch of the rebranded Paramount+,” Gaughan wrote in a blog post.

Parks: 46% of U.S. Broadband Households Subscribe to Four or More OTT Video Services

With a slew of new and re-imagined streaming video services on the market in the past year, high-speed internet households are embracing the choices.

New data from Parks Associates’ Q1 2021 survey of 10,000 broadband households found that 46% of respondents subscribe to four or more OTT services, and 82% of respondents have at least one SVOD subscription, compared with 76% in Q1 2020.

Subscribe HERE to the FREE Media Play News Daily Newsletter!

“New services are employing a variety of growth strategies, including external partnerships to expand their reach and market footprint and augmentations to their offerings to grow share and increase retention,” Elizabeth Parks, president of Parks Associates, said in a statement.

“With OTT adoption so high, providers are exploring new strategies, including expanded IP and AI-powered enhancements, to stay competitive,” added research director Steve Nason.

Churn Nightmare: Only 20% of Streaming Video Subs Content to Stay With Providers

Churn, or streaming video subscribers canceling their service, is a occupational hazard in the SVOD business. According to new data from Interpret, only 20% of streaming video subscribers are content to stay with their current providers.

The aggressive marketing of new streaming services has in recent years provided consumers with more incentive to cut the pay-TV cord and sign up for alternative services, but subscriber churn has now become an increasing problem for streaming service providers as well.

Subscribe HERE to the FREE Media Play News Daily Newsletter!

According to Interpret’s Video Churn Today: Trends, Changes and Outlook 2021 report, SVOD subscribers increased by 14% in the second half of 2020 — driven in part by the pandemic. During the same period, the rate of cancellation increased to 20% from 15% — signaling that churn is not unique to pay-TV providers. Linear TV operators saw churn increase two points to 7% during the second half of the year.

“Subscriber churn was a concern for many video service providers prior to the pandemic, particularly for pay-TV,” Brett Sappington, VP of research at Interpret, said in a statement.

Sappington said the interruption in content, household income and viewing behavior, along with heightened competition during the pandemic, has led to changes in how consumers value and evaluate video offerings. Specifically, subscribers now realize that they can’t get all of their preferred content in one place, according to Sappington.

“The industry is essentially training consumers to be churn tolerant,” he said. “So, the question for the future is less about how to stop churn, and more about how to make churn work in your favor.”

According to the Interpret report, consumers who subscribe to multiple SVOD services also have a willingness to watch ad-supported streaming (AVOD) services, providing ad agencies growing inventory on streaming outlets. Consumers, moreover, are actively taking advantage of trials without subscribing, and adding and dropping services on an increasing basis. Nearly 20% of subscribers report switching among services to watch platform exclusives, and 13% report canceling a service after watching a selected video series.

Churn Is OTT’s Great Challenge of 2021; Smarter Data Is the Solution

Every click, tap, and keystroke contains valuable information about the customer on the other side of the screen. Multiply those interactions by the 200 million streaming subscribers in the United States, and the result is a trove of data on how Americans are consuming, and abandoning, content. Media executives are turning to that data to overcome the vexing problem of customer churn.

Mark Moeder

OTT churn in the U.S. market reached 41% in the first quarter of 2020, up 6% from the previous year. It dropped to 38% by the third quarter, compared with 46% in Q3 of 2019. Fluctuating subscriber trends reflect the effect of COVID-19 lockdowns and economic uncertainty, which will influence consumer behavior for years to come. Media providers are bracing for the impact.

Weathering the storm will take actionable, predictive insight gleaned from every possible first- and third-party data source. Data-driven churn mitigation strategies call for scalable technology that can make sense of the mass, and mess, of available data.

The Anti-Churn Tool Kit

Almost two-thirds of media executives see “exploiting rapidly increasing availability of data” as a business opportunity, according to a global EY survey. Those who can move swiftly from data collection to quality insight will see the greatest impact on subscriber retention.

The danger lies in impartial execution. The most accessible data sets are not necessarily the most valuable, but organizations frequently rely on such limited sources to develop the customer profiles that drive engagement strategies. Even experienced media executives may not know what other data to look for, or how to make sense of it.

Truly anticipating what customers want takes deep data analysis at scale. Enterprise artificial intelligence enables rapid and comprehensive subscriber intelligence. One of AI’s most powerful capabilities is sorting unstructured data from diverse sources to find the most valuable insight. Media providers can leverage AI technology to get more value from these five essential data sources:

  • Interactive: Every decision made says something about what matters to a customer: search queries, session frequency and duration, and content genre and theme preferences.
  • Technographic: Companies should know customers more deeply than their demographics. Factors like device hopping and ISP speed impact customers’ experience of the content they choose to engage with.
  • Quality of experience: Streaming performance is a key differentiator for VOD audiences. Metrics like initial start time, buffering instances, and bit rate contain important signals that correlate to customer satisfaction.
  • Transactional: Payment data such as credit card expiration date and billing activity can indicate which promotional tactic will be most effective to minimize subscription lapse and maximize renewals and upgrades.
  • Marketability: Advanced segmentation based on churn risk rather than familiar (but potentially less effective) demographic criteria can optimize outreach, minimize customer acquisition cost and maximize lifetime value.

 

The Window for Differentiation Is Closing

Right now, AI is a competitive advantage, but eventually it will become table stakes in the industry. In 2017, as media and entertainment companies began experimenting with AI tools, Tod Loofbourrow, an entrepreneur and former Harvard Business School lecturer, said, “We’re at the very beginning of a 20-year megatrend.” Today, the same companies are now at drastically different stages in their AI journeys. But the window for AI differentiation, when they will have the opportunity to work with that data to reduce churn, among other cost-saving benefits, is already closing.

According to a global Gartner survey of chief information officers, including those in non-media companies, AI implementation in 2019 grew a remarkable 270% in the previous four years and 37% in the past year alone. A McKinsey survey that same year found that “a majority of executives whose companies have adopted AI report that it has provided an uptick in revenue in the business areas where it is used.” Only more companies, including media and entertainment firms, will apply AI to their business in the future.

Subscriber loyalty is a critical executive priority, and data is proliferating. For media and entertainment companies, time is of the essence to leverage that data. Executives can’t afford impartial insight if they intend to take decisive action to address churn. Comprehensive, scalable intelligence is essential to make churn mitigation an immediate reality. AI technology is the most effective tool available to bridge the gap.

Mark Moeder is the CEO of Symphony MediaAI, a provider of revenue optimization solutions exclusive to the media and entertainment sector.

Pandemic Insight: SVOD, Movie Transactions, Churn Soar; AVOD Ads Decline

A silver lining in the ongoing coronavirus pandemic has been a surge in home entertainment activity among consumers either on mandated lockdown or deprived of live and theatrical or venue options. Paid subscriptions are the dominant business model for streaming video services in the U.S., although competition from free ad-supported services is growing. Or is it?

The data is clear: SVOD services such as Netflix and Disney Plus have seen skyrocketing sub growth worldwide as consumer gravitate toward on-demand movies and TV shows. Upstart rival ad-supported VOD also experienced usage increases — and advertising declines.

Roy Morgan research in Australia found subscription TV services made large gains during 2020 with viewership soaring for the top five services compared to 2019. The strong increases across the board meant that more than 80% of Aussies (17.3 million), now watch SVOD in an average four weeks — up by more than 2.4 million viewers on a year ago.

Subscribe HERE to the FREE Media Play News Daily Newsletter!

“Netflix remains the clear market leader in Australia and grew its viewership by 2.26 million (up 19%) from a year ago to 14.17 million viewers. Over two-thirds of all Australians aged 14+ (67.2%) now watch Netflix in an average four weeks,” read the report.

Media Partners Asia found that in Indonesia about 7 million people have subscriptions across the Top 10 services — up 3.6 million subs between Sept. 5th 2020 to Jan. 6th 2021. The research shows the top 4 Aussie platforms account for 83% of the total subscriber base with Disney+ Hotstar in the lead with 2.5 million new customers, followed by Viu (1.5 million), Vidio (1.1 million) and Netflix (850,000).

At the same time, ad-supported VOD saw a slight decline (5%) in annual ad impressions due to COVID-19 and the resulting fluidity in ad creatives and ad campaigns as the pandemic undermined content creation, according to new Canoe data.

“The lockdown measures to help slow the spread of COVID-19 created a boost in viewership from March through May. Then, September through December viewing was impacted due to production shutdowns, delaying new fall-season entertainment content,” read the report.

Meanwhile, Deliotte found the pandemic has increased one-off content viewing among new SVOD viewers and slowed some churn among existing subs. The consulting giant found that among survey respondents who cut a streaming service since the start of the pandemic, 62% had signed up to watch a specific show and then cancelled once they were done. And they canceled quickly: 43% canceled the same day they decided they no longer wanted the service.

Overall, data from May to October 2020 suggests that SVOD providers may be getting better at demonstrating value to consumers. Those consumers who canceled due to cost fell from 36% to 31%, and those who left after a free trial or discount ended also decreased from 35% to 28%. By October 2020, 25% of subscribers had canceled a service and replaced it with another new service, up from 17% in May.

Notably, Deloitte found that 90% of respondents who paid to watch new movie releases at home said they would likely do so again — underscoring Hollywood’s move to offer new movies to consumers directly in the home sooner. Indeed, 23% of respondents said they would continue the platform if they could purchase new movie releases the same day they are released to theaters.

When Deloitte asked subscribers what would keep them from cancelling a paid streaming service, 27% said they would stay to see an exclusive new movie or series they were interested in, and 28% said they would stay if they could switch to a reduced cost, ad-supported tier of the service.

“In our January 2020 survey, only 20% of respondents who subscribed to a streaming video service had cut a service in the previous 12 months, but by October, 46% had cut at least one in just the previous six months,” read the report.

In May, Deloitte said 23% of respondents had added a streaming video service since the start of the pandemic, and 9% had added and canceled services. By October, 34% had both added and canceled streaming video services. The early part of 2020 saw greater acquisition, but the second half has been characterized by churn.

“While COVID-19 appears to have accelerated streaming video subscriptions, the dynamism we now see is likely the emerging characteristic of a more mature and competitive market,” Deloitte said.

Parks: OTT Video Subscriber Loyalty Up as Churn Drops During Pandemic

During a pandemic, consumers gravitate toward experiences they trust. New data from Parks Associates finds the overall annual churn rate for OTT services, representing those subscribers who have canceled a service as a percentage of the current subscriber base, dropped from 46% in 3Q 2019 to 38% in 3Q 2020. As a subset of subscription-based OTT services, online TV services experienced an even more dramatic drop, from 84% in 2019 to 49% in 2020.

Subscribe HERE to the FREE Media Play News Daily Newsletter!

“Households across the U.S. continue to be primarily homebound or more homebound than they have been in prior ‘normal times,'” research director Steve Nason said in a statement. “They have much more time and opportunity to engage and interact with OTT services and are deciding to stick with services, including midsized and smaller ones, longer than normal. Consequently, we are seeing a lower overall churn rate for OTT services.”

Parks found considerably lower churn rates among Netflix, Amazon Prime Video and Hulu than the overall average for all OTT services. The Disney+ churn rate was at 13%, while HBO Max, Apple TV+, and Peacock was around 20%. For online TV, churn rates remain high, but the pandemic has accelerated the migration away from traditional pay-TV services via a cable or satellite provider while also encouraging extended subscriptions.

“Online pay-TV services that offer bundles of live channels, are a direct beneficiary of the move away from traditional pay-TV services,” Nason said. “This trend, along with the return of live sports, is a huge growth accelerant for services such as YouTube TV, Hulu with Live TV, and fuboTV. As a result, the churn rate for online TV, while still hovering near 50%, has been significantly reduced in this latest release.”

All Eyes on Netflix Satellite As It Orbits Fiscal Sun

Netflix Oct. 20 will release fiscal third-quarter (ended Sept. 30) results after the market closes. While a traditional flag bearer among media/tech companies during financials, this 90-day period brings added scrutiny. Netflix has been on a tear. Its stock has catapulted 75% since mid-March when the pandemic started — reaching a near all-time high Oct. 16.

But can the SVOD pioneer sustain its skyrocketing subscriber growth during the pandemic, and, secondarily, can it overcome the media/legal fallout from criminal charges alleging the service streamed “lewd material of children” in the French-language movie Cuties?

To be sure, Netflix has tempered its own fiscal expectations, projecting 2.5 million total sub additions worldwide. That’s less than the market consensus of 3.26 million subs. Wedbush Securities media analyst Michael Pachter said he believes the SVOD giant added just 250,000 domestic subs and 2.3 million internationally in the quarter. Netflix added a record 25.9 million subs in the first six months of the year — more than it did for the entire 2019.

Subscribe HERE to the FREE Media Play News Daily Newsletter!

Analysts expect operating income of $1.29 billion, while Netflix is projecting $1.24 billion. Over the past 2 years, Netflix has topped earnings-per-share estimates 75% of the time, while trumping revenue projections 75% of the time.

While industry scuttlebutt suggests Netflix lost millions of subs in the quarter due to the controversy over Cuties — a fictional movie about an 11-year-old Senegalese girl coming of age in 21st century Paris against the backdrop of a religious mother and peer pressure from a young female dance troupe — Pachter thinks increased content demands from housebound subs drove churn higher.Follow us HERE on Twitter!The analyst contends that with the increased numbers of consumers still largely confined to home entertainment due to COVID-19, the lack of new original content on Netflix will increase service dissatisfaction.“The extraordinary level of consumption of Netflix content multiplied by its large subscriber base suggests to us that some meaningful percentage of subscribers will ‘finish’ Netflix before a large quantity of new content can be produced,” Pachter wrote in a note.The analyst said Netflix is facing a potential loss of 2 million subs per quarter going forward without a significant increase in original content. Indeed, recent data from Nielsen found that among Netflix’s most-popular shows, 50% were network reruns.“The law of large numbers suggests to us that if the rate of subscriber churn grows by ‘only’ 1%, Netflix could face an uptick loss of subscribers per quarter beginning later this year or early next year,” Pachter wrote. “We suspect that this phenomenon has already begun and led to the company’s lackluster guidance for Q3 net additions.”

Analysts: Netflix Eyeing Flat Q3 Sub Growth, Near-Term Price Hike

In the rollercoaster COVID-19 era, few media companies have shined as brightly as Netflix. The SVOD pioneer has defied odds and naysayers, adding more subscribers (26 million) in the first six months of the year than it did in all of 2019. It ended June with 193 million subs worldwide.

As the third quarter closes on Sept. 30, the SVOD pioneer is facing challenges, not the least of which is a probable near-term subscription price hike. Netflix hasn’t raised its domestic fee since May 2019 when the most-popular plan increased $2 to $13 monthly.

“After a change in language regarding pricing on the [Q2] call, we believe a potential hike is probable in the near to midterm,” Alex Giaimo, analyst at Jeffries, wrote in a note. “In Q1, Netflix said that they were ‘not even thinking about price increases,’ while the Q2 language was more open-ended.”

Subscribe HERE to the FREE Media Play News Daily Newsletter!

Jeffries contends price hikes from $1 to $2 monthly in North America and Europe could see Netflix add near $1 billion in fiscal 2021 revenue. A similar price hike in Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA) could add $700 million.

“We have confidence that Netflix can raise prices in international markets, given its deepening content library and outsized consumer value proposition,” Giaimo wrote.

On the domestic front, Netflix is facing blowback from politicians and public action committees regarding a small French movie, Cuties, critics say exploits young girls. The streamer also received a letter from GOP senators questioning its motives behind greenlighting an original series based on a book by a Chinese author accused of being pro-Beijing government and anti-ethnic Uyghur Muslims. Both situations have seen increased calls on social media to cancel Netflix subscriptions.

Wells Fargo analysts contend Netflix will add 2.5 million subs globally in Q3 — down from a previously projected 5 million due to increases in subscriber churn. The culprit: a fivefold churn increase to 4.7% in one-week subscriber defections due to Cuties. The analysts said that could result in a sub loss of 28 million. Netflix is projecting a global sub gain of 2.5 million.

Meanwhile, Michael Pachter, media analyst with Wedbush Securities in Los Angeles, said he would surprised if the Cuties controversy extended beyond the United States. The analyst said that with one-third of households considering themselves religious, it’s possible Netflix saw a spike of 1% to 2% over its normal churn.

“Combine that with the pull-forward of new subscribers from shelter-in-place. and they could deliver disappointing domestic subscriber growth,” Pachter said in an email.

The analyst said he would be “shocked” if Netflix raised prices in the face of new competitors such as Disney+, Peacock, Apple TV+ and HBO Max.

“They had no competition before and now they have [competition] priced lower, Amazon content is getting better, and HBO Max will someday figure out how to get their product on Roku-powered TVs,” Pachter said.

“Yes, I think that they can raise the price and that the brand is super strong, but the cult [Netflix bulls] values them at ridiculous levels because the cult believes in unfettered growth, and any shift in that narrative will disappoint them,” he said. “I still don’t expect a price hike.”

Netflix reports third-quarter results Oct. 20.