Roku Orders Second Season of ‘Most Dangerous Game’

Roku Aug. 23 announced it has greenlighted a second season of “Most Dangerous Game,” the action thriller written by Nick Santora and starring two-time Oscar winner Christoph Waltz as Miles Sellers, CEO of The Tiro Fund — a front for a centuries old game in which hunters pay exorbitant fees for the privilege of hunting the most cunning and dangerous prey there is: People.

David Castañeda joins the season as new lead Victor Suero, a down-on-his-luck fighter, who will do anything to protect his sister and when he learns she’s in trouble. The series will be produced by CBS Studios.

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“Audiences gravitated towards the dynamic storytelling and uncompromising action of season one,” Colin Davis, head of scripted at Roku, said in a statement. “Nick Santora’s script for season two takes the thrill to the next level in New York and with David Castañeda joining Christoph Waltz, it was an easy decision to bring the show back for another season.”

The first season of “Most Dangerous Game,” featuring Liam Hemsworth, is available now on The Roku Channel. In addition to Roku devices, The Roku Channel is available on Web, iOS and Android devices, Amazon Fire TV and select Samsung TVs, and can be accessed internationally in the U.S., Canada and the United Kingdom.

Roku Originals come from the content portfolio of Quibi, the shuttered SVOD platform launched by Jeffrey Katzenberg and Meg Whitman. The programming has helped AVOD-based The Roku Channel double streaming hours year-over-year in Q2 2021.

Launched in 2017, The Roku Channel features a line-up of more than 40,000 movies and programs, and more than 190 free live linear-television channels. The Roku Channel licenses and distributes content from more than 175 partners.

Paramount Bringing Thriller ‘Georgetown’ to DVD June 22

Paramount Home Entertainment will release the crime thriller Georgetown on DVD June 22. The Romulus Entertainment Production is available now in select theaters, on VOD and for digital purchase.

The film marks the directorial debut of Christoph Waltz, who also stars alongside Vanessa Redgrave and Annette Bening.

In the true crime story, Waltz stars as Ulrich Mott, an eccentric and smooth-talking social climber who seems to have everyone in Washington, D.C. wrapped around his finger. But when his wealthy, well-connected and much older wife (Redgrave) turns up dead in their home, her daughter Amanda (Bening) suspects Ulrich may not be all that he seems as the police investigation begins to uncover a larger deception that goes far deeper than anyone ever imagined.

The film is rated ‘R’ for language and brief sexual material.

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‘Alita: Battle Angel’ Heading Home in July

The sci-fi actioner Alita: Battle Angel will be released July 9 digitally, and July 23 on Blu-ray, DVD and as a combo pack containing 4K Ultra HD and 3D Blu-rays of the film.

Produced by James Cameron and Jon Landau, directed by Robert Rodriguez, and based on a 1990s Japanese manga series, the film stars Rosa Salazar as Alita, a discarded cyborg in a futuristic city searching for clues to remember her past. The cast also includes Christoph Waltz, Jennifer Connelly, Mahershala Ali, Ed Skrein, Jackie Earle Haley and Keenan Johnson.

The film has earned $85.7 million at the domestic box office and $405 million worldwide.

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The DVD, Blu-ray and digital versions, from 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment, now part of the Walt Disney Co., will include four “Alita’s World” motion comics and the featurette “From Manga to Screen.”

The Blu-ray and digital versions will also include four scene deconstructions; a compilation of Cameron’s 2005 concept art; a Q&A with Cameron, Rodriguez and cast moderated by Landau; an “Evolition of Alita” featurette; a “Motorball” featurette; and “Robert Rodriguez’s 10-Minute Cooking School: Chocolate.”

The digital version will also include a “Musical Themes” featurette; a “Streets of Iron City” set tour with Rodriguez; “Allies and Adversaries” vignettes; a reel of 2016 concept art; and theatrical trailers.

The 4K presentation will include high dynamic range in Dolby Vision, HDR10 and HDR10+ formats.

Downsizing

BLU-RAY REVIEW:

Paramount;
Sci-Fi Comedy;
Box Office $24.45 million;
$29.99 DVD, $39.99 Blu-ray, $34.99 UHD BD;
Rated ‘R’ for language including sexual references, some graphic nudity and drug use.
Stars Matt Damon, Kristen Wiig, Christoph Waltz, Hong Chau, Udo Kier, Rolf Lassgård, Jason Sudeikis.

Director Alexander Payne’s Downsizing is a premise in search of a story, and the one they ultimately came up with could leave viewers wondering, as the film’s main character does, what the point of it all was.

Downsizing is essentially a two-hour thought experiment about what the world would be like if people could shrink themselves to be five inches tall.

The procedure is discovered by Scandinavian scientists looking to reduce the impacts of overpopulation on the environment — since smaller humans use fewer resources. Years later, the process is touted in America as a way to retire in luxury, since the equivalent needs of smaller people would cost so much less, and people could live in mansions that are essentially just large dollhouses.

Contemplating the transition are Paul and Audrey Safranek (Matt Damon and Kristen Wiig), who find themselves stifled by their modest but stable middle class lifestyle. After learning that as small people they’d be the equivalent of millionaires, they sign up to move to a downsized community. But at the last moment Audrey panics at the prospect of leaving her old life behind (and after seeing what it takes to shrink, I can’t say I blame her). But her decision comes too late for Paul, who gets reduced and finds his new life plan derailed without his wife.

A year later and he’s divorced, forced to scale back even in downsize-land, and again living a mediocre life, until he runs across a refugee from Vietnam (Hong Chau), who begins to open his eyes to a more meaningful world around him.

So, what we end up with is a message that people are still people no matter what size they are.

The film’s presentation of the shrinking process is the kind of plot element that falls apart after thinking about it for any length of time, since there’s no attempt to address things like how a scaled-down body would react to the normal gravity it originally evolved in, or where all a person’s extra mass ends up. The film also doesn’t address which parts of the body know how to shrink aside from the vague description of “cellular reduction” (as if every chemical in the body were a cell), but at least it remembers that things like dental fillings, prosthetic implants and anything artificial would have to be removed first.

Of course, aside from the incentives for shrinking, the film also doesn’t really make it seem pleasant, since it would subject you to new dangers you wouldn’t have thought twice about before, such as insects, birds, cats and dogs. It’s even mentioned that sunlight is more dangerous to small people, and the tiny communities are covered in nets or domes to try to keep these realities at bay.

So, best not to think too hard about it. The main reason for the sci-fi element is to allow for some social commentary (as sci-fi tends to do). Many of the character elements are played for satire, but the film has trouble finding a consistent tone amid all the plot points Payne is trying to explore.

The first third of the film deals with the shrinking process, how it evolved, and how and why people would undergo it. While for most people it’s a choice, there’s also some subversive suggestions that corrupt governments are forcing it upon people, or terrorists are using it to circumvent security plans. The film shows what it would be like for people about to downsize, and questions arise about the political and economic impacts downsizing has on society.

Then we get Paul coming to terms with his decision to get small and adjusting to his life and dealing with the regrets than ensue.

This is all more or less straightforward before the film turns toward an environmental disaster subplot and how small people can survive it if they can’t prevent it.

Unlike Ant-Man, the film isn’t overtly trying to have fun with the idea of shrinking. It takes it seriously, as if it’s just another way of life for the characters. That’s why the film’s structure seems so odd, since it’s devoting so much time to establishing how downsizing came to be and became a relatively common thing before focusing on a story that pushes it all to the background. A lot of scenes are presented as pretty standard character beats, when the camera catches a glimpse of an oversized prop from time to time to remind everyone about the premise (of course, such a mundane approach is likely the point).

All the while the film teases us with suggestions of things we might rather have seen, such as the bodies actually shrinking. Or what happens when a filling isn’t fully removed from a tooth beforehand.

As a result, the film is more interesting for individual scenes that present its concepts, rather than its muddled attempts to unify it as a whole. As with most movies that deal with shrinking tech, the best scenes involve seeing the small people interacting with normal-sized things (even though, many of the everyday items in the small community are just scaled-down versions of things — which only raises more questions).

There are a lot of clever touches in the shifting perspectives (such as a dollar bill used as giant wall art), and the design of the small communities are a treat to behold. People always seem to be fascinated by the idea of seeing the real world reduced into a scale miniature, and the colonies in the film also seem set up as tourist destinations for regular-sized people who just want to gawk at a world in miniature (there’s a reason why Storybookland is such a popular ride at Disneyland).

The Blu-ray offers an hour’s worth of featurettes about the making of the film, many of which expose little details about the set designs and the presentation of the miniature world. There are also a couple of additional featurettes with the iTunes version (available with the UltraViolet code included with the disc).