Doc ‘The Beatles and India’ Arrives on DVD and Blu-ray June 21 From MVD

The feature documentary The Beatles and India, from Silva Screen Productions and Renoir Pictures, will be released on DVD and Blu-ray June 21 from MVD Entertainment Group.

The documentary examines how Indian music and culture shaped the music of the band and explores how The Beatles served as ambassadors of the pioneering World music sound and cultural movement. In 1968, The Beatles had achieved mass fame and fortune yet were searching for deeper meaning in their lives. Under the spiritual guidance of Indian guru Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, The Beatles took a trip to Rishikesh, India, to study Transcendental Meditation. Drawing together an expansive archive of footage including contemporaneous locale shooting in India, recordings, photographs and first-hand interviews, The Beatles and India documents this East-meets-West touchstone in pop-culture history.

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Inspired by Ajoy Bose’s book Across The Universe — The Beatles In India, the documentary was produced by British Indian music entrepreneur Reynold D’Silva and directed by Bose (his directorial debut) and cultural researcher Pete Compton.

The Beatles and India has been awarded Best Film Audience Choice and Best Music at the 2021 U.K. Asian Film Festival “Tongues on Fire.” The film has also been nominated for Best Documentary at the 2022 New York Indian Film Festival.

Recalled Beatles Doc ‘Get Back’ a Hot Commodity on eBay

Copies of the recalled The Beatles: Get Back documentary on Blu-ray Disc are a hot commodity on eBay, where they are being offered for as much as $999.99.

The docuseries, which was supposed to be released Feb. 8, was yanked by Disney due to a technical glitch. But some copies still found their way into stores, including a Target in Orange County, Calif., where several copies were spotted in the new-release section.

Media Play News had reported that shoppers were not able to actually buy copies of Peter Jackson’s acclaimed documentary on the legendary British rock band, with any potential sale flagged by checkout computers.

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But apparently some copies still found their way into the public’s hands. An early morning check of eBay, the online auction site, found 14 copies of Get Back listed for sale, at prices as high as $999.99.

Under “completed auctions,” there were several successful sales, including one for $399.99 that sold on Feb. 7, the day before the Blu-ray Disc was supposed to be released.

The initial release date was slated for nine days after an hour-long concert film of the group’s iconic 1969 rooftop concert was released at select Imax theaters on Jan. 30, the 53rd anniversary of the performance atop the Apple Corps’ Savile Row headquarters. The concert film includes a Q&A with director Jackson, who said in a statement, “I’m thrilled that the rooftop concert from The Beatles: Get Back is going to be experienced in Imax, on that huge screen. It’s The Beatles’ last concert, and it’s the absolute perfect way to see and hear it.”

The concert, which is included in the documentary, has been digitally remastered with proprietary Imax DMR (digital remastering) technology.

The Imax event was followed by a global theatrical run of the 60-minute concert film that began Feb. 11 and ran through the weekend.

The Beatles: Get Back covers the making of the Beatles’ 1970 album Let It Be, whose working title was Get Back. Originally conceived as a feature film, The Beatles: Get Back was expanded into three episodes with a total runtime of nearly eight hours. The docuseries, which premiered on Disney+ Nov. 25, was compiled from nearly 60 hours of unseen footage shot over 21 days, directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg in 1969, and from more than 150 hours of unheard audio, most of which has been locked in a vault for over half a century, according to a press release.

Some Copies of ‘The Beatles: Get Back’ on Blu-ray Appeared at Retail Despite Recall

Some copies of The Beatles: Get Back appeared on retail shelves Feb. 8 despite a recall.

Several Blu-ray Disc copies of Peter Jackson’s acclaimed documentary on the legendary British rock band were spotted in the new-release section at a Target in Orange County, Calif.

The title had been slated for a Feb. 8 release but was recalled due to a technical glitch. A new release date hasn’t been announced.

However, it’s not as if shoppers could actually buy copies of Get Back if they managed to find a stray. Once the street date was canceled the checkout computers and major retailers such as Target and Walmart would have been set to flag attempts to scan it at the register, prompting a clerk or manager take possession of it and remove the rest from the sales floor.

The initial release date was slated for nine days after an hour-long concert film of the group’s iconic 1969 rooftop concert was released at select Imax theaters on Jan. 30, the 53rd anniversary of the performance atop the Apple Corps’ Savile Row headquarters.  The concert film includes a Q&A with director Jackson, who said in a statement, “I’m thrilled that the rooftop concert from The Beatles: Get Back is going to be experienced in Imax, on that huge screen. It’s The Beatles’ last concert, and it’s the absolute perfect way to see and hear it.”

Subscribe HERE to the FREE Media Play News Daily Newsletter!

The concert, which is included in the documentary, will be digitally remastered with proprietary Imax DMR (digital remastering) technology.

The Imax event is being followed by a global theatrical run of the 60-minute concert film that starts today (Feb. 11) and runs through the weekend.

The Beatles: Get Back covers the making of the Beatles’ 1970 album Let It Be, whose working title was Get Back. Originally conceived as a feature film, The Beatles: Get Back was expanded into three episodes with a total runtime of nearly eight hours. The docuseries, which premiered on Disney+ on Nov. 25, was compiled from nearly 60 hours of unseen footage shot over 21 days, directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg in 1969, and from more than 150 hours of unheard audio, most of which has been locked in a vault for over half a century, according to a press release.