TiVo: 30% of Americans Using Smart TVs to Stream Video

In an over-the-top video ecosystem, new data from the latest TiVo Video Trends Report finds that more than 30% of Americans surveyed access streaming video through Internet-connected televisions. That compares with 16.3%, 15.4% and 14.3% for the next three most-popular streaming media devices, including mobile devices, Amazon Fire TV and Roku, respectively.

The data, which is based on a first-quarter (ended March 31) survey of 4,367 adults in the U.S. and Canada, would appear to slightly undermine Roku’s actual market share considering the streaming media pioneer’s OS software powers most Chinese-made Smart TVs not branded Samsung.

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TiVo said Samsung’s Wizen operating system is found in more than 50% of Smart TVs, followed by Google-owned Android TV (14.1%), Roku (13%) and LG’s WebOS (2%). Mobile devices are primarily powered by Apple iOS and Google Android.

Notably, Peacock, NBCUniversal’s pending streaming service, will be available on Vizio SmartCast TVs and LG Smart TVs when it launches July 15. Meanwhile, WarnerMedia’s HBO Max launched May 27 without distribution on Roku and Fire TV, underscoring the platform’s sluggish launch.

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According to data from Sensor Tower, 87,000 people used the Apple App Store and Google Play to download the HBO Max app on its first day. That was dwarfed by rivals Quibi and Disney+, which generated 380,000 and 4 million mobile downloads, respectively, on their first days of operation.

Reports: Amazon Prime App Unavailable on Apple TV and iOS App Store

The Amazon Prime Video app disappeared Friday, Oct. 4, from Apple’s app store and Apple TV, according to news and social media reports.

“The developer has removed this app from the App Store,” is the notice that many mobile users received, according to reports. “Item not available” was another message when trying to download the app.

The app was also missing from Apple TV, according to reports.

It was a temporary glitch, according to Amazon.

“Earlier today, there was a technical glitch that impacted the Prime Video app on iOS and tvOS devices. The issue has been resolved, and the Prime Video app is now once again available in the App Store,” read an Amazon statement.

The glitch comes as Apple plans to launch its own streaming service, Apple TV+, Nov. 1 at $4.99.

Disney, too, is entering the market with Disney+ Nov. 12, and its CEO Bob Iger resigned from Apple’s board Sept. 10, the day the tech giant announced details about the pricing and release of its streaming service.

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In another streaming dustup, Disney is reportedly banning Netflix ads from all of its entertainment TV networks, including ABC, according to The Wall Street Journal.

Study: Android Bridging Apple iOS Divide

Apple’s operating system, iOS, had dominated mobile video market share for years due in large part to the success of the iPhone and iPad tablet.

That supremacy is now in question as longtime rival Android ratchets up market share, according to new data from Brightcove.

The Boston–based software company found that while the market share of videos played on Android phones and tablets topped 64% in the second quarter (ended June 30) — up from 56% a year ago, Apple iOS saw its share slip to 36% from 44%.

Indeed, consumption of video on Android phones reached 68% in Q2, up from 59% a year ago. Smartphone share for iOS declined to 32% from 41% 12 months earlier.

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Video plays on tablets remained flat, with iOS still dominant at 60% (down from 61% a year ago) and Android tablet plays at 40%, compared to 39% in Q2 2018.

Brightcove found viewers are more likely to watch a video to completion on a tablet (44% of the time) compared to a smartphone (35% of the time). They’re also slightly more likely to consume a video in its entirety on an iOS device than an Android device.

The average minutes spent watching video on iPhones and Android phones increased over the past year.

The report found that Android use increased 6% to 16.8 minutes, while iPhone use increased 20% to 22.3 minutes. Android maintains the lead in total video consumption at 62%.

With tablets, iOS maintains its advantage in average minutes watched and share of time watched overall. Both due to the continued strength of the iPad in the market compared to other tablets, according to the report.

iPad viewers watched an average of 23.8 minutes, up from 23.4 minutes a year ago. For Android tablets, the average was 21 minutes, slipping from 23.9 minutes a year earlier. iPad video consumption is double compared to Android tablets.

“Over the past several years, tablets have become a smaller segment of the [mobile video] market, although they still see significant use and shouldn’t be ignored,” read the report.

Report: Long-Form Mobile Video Viewership Surges as iOS Use Declines

Consumption of short-form video on mobile and connected devices in the home is being challenged by long-form video, according to new data from the Q2 Brightcove Global Video Index, analyzing how viewers are watching video content, which devices they are using, and what types of content they are consuming across these various devices.

Long-form video (21-40 minutes) and ultra-long-form video (41+ minutes) saw faster growth in the share of “time watched” on every device, from connected TVs to smartphones.

Ultra-long-form content took the highest total share of “time watched” across all devices, despite short-form video (0-5 minutes) having the highest number of assets published.

The report found that 53% of global video views begin on mobile devices, smartphones, and tablets, taking away share from traditional desktop computers. Smartphones saw the highest growth, to 45% from 38% only one year ago.

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In emerging markets, especially Asia Pacific, mobile is king, where 84% of all video consumption is on mobile phones, and with Japan/Korea at 58%.

In the Middle East and Africa, smartphone use tops 57%. In every region but U.S. and Canada, mobile devices took share away from desktop computers.

The report found that the increasing quality of delivery to mobile devices, cheaper data plans, and more affordable Android smartphones from China has had a significant impact on how content is consumed.

“Leveraging mobile video continues to be crucial for OTT providers, as they look to not only reach younger viewers — who traditionally have been mobile first — but also older viewers who have discovered that mobile video is a convenient way to consume content outside the home,” Jim O’Neill, principal analyst, Brightcove, said in a statement.

O’Neill said the amount of content being consumed on mobile devices has more than doubled over the past year. He cites the fact content owners and distributors are making premium content available to consumers on any device.

“This growth will continue as more content — especially high-value sports content — becomes more prevalent and easily accessible on mobile devices,” O’Neill said.

“Mobile is no longer dominated by snackable content — instead, it provides a multi-course meal to consumers,” O’Neill said, “At the International Broadcasting Conference (IBC) earlier this month, the discussion has changed from what’s included broadly in the content mix to delivering content direct-to-consumers with more personalization and fewer limitations.”

Separately, Brightcove said the dominance of iOS on mobile devices has eroded in the past year with video viewed on Android devices now more prevalent.

Globally, Android smartphone share has increased to 68% from 59% one year ago, with Apple iOS remaining dominant for tablet plays.

Android use is highest in Asia Pacific, where 92% of video plays are on Android phones and tablets. Europe is the next highest with 70% of video plays on Android devices. Only Japan/Korea continues to see growth in iOS.