‘A Thousand Cuts’ Debuts Jan. 9 on PBS Documentaries Prime Video Channel

The “Frontline” documentary A Thousand Cuts will debut on the PBS Documentaries Prime Video Channel Jan. 9.

The film follows Philippine journalist and Time Person of the Year Maria Ressa as she is targeted by President Rodrigo Duterte for exposing the truth of the political corruption in her country on her news site, Rappler. The film offers an inside look at the key players in the escalating war between press and government in the Philippines and the ongoing threat against freedom of the press.

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It examines social media disinformation campaigns and the crackdown on the news media in the Philippines by Duterte — who has made Ressa one of his top targets. At great personal risk, Ressa has been at the forefront of holding Duterte and his government accountable for their violent war on drugs. In response, Duterte has barred Rappler reporters from the presidential palace and revoked Rappler’s license. Ressa herself has been charged with a cyber libel case. Ressa places the tools of the free press — and her own freedom — on the line in defense of truth and democracy in “A Thousand Cuts.”

The film received a Grand Jury Prize nomination from the Sundance Film Festival and a Best Documentary Award Nomination at the Gotham Independent Film Festival.

The subscription rate for the PBS Documentaries Prime Video Channel is $3.99 per month with an Amazon Prime or Prime Video subscription.

New Episodes From ‘Arthur,’ ‘Nature Cat,’ ‘Xaxier Riddle’ Coming in November on PBS Kids Prime Video Channel

PBS Distribution in November will feature programming from “Arthur,” “Xavier Riddle and The Secret Museum,” “Elinor Wonders Why,” “Cyberchase” and “Nature Cat” on the PBS Kids Prime Video Channel.

The subscription rate for the PBS Kids Prime Video Channel is $4.99 a month with an Amazon Prime or Prime Video subscription.

Arthur: An Arthur Thanksgiving bows Nov. 17. In this new film, Arthur and his family are getting ready for Thanksgiving, but when Pal disappears to go on his own adventure, Arthur puts his plans on hold to search for him. Meanwhile, D.W. starts to think that Aunt Minnie might be more of an Aunt “Meanie.” In this movie, family, friends, and the rest of Elwood City will try to get Pal home, and hopefully D.W. and Aunt Minnie will be able to joyously celebrate the holiday together.

“Cyberchase Vol. 12” debuts Nov. 6. Digit’s friend Ren is excited to plan a Valentine’s Day party at his favorite garden but discovers that the garden isn’t available. He and the CyberSquad must find a Plan B in “A Garden Grows in Botlyn.” Then, Digit’s cousin Brigit is in a bind. Her flowering cactus plants are not bearing any apple cactus fruit. According to her chart, the bats she needs to pollinate the flowers are missing. The Earth kids lead a search party in “Missing Bats in Sensible Flats.” Plus, Buzz and Delete surprise their boss Hacker with a blissful day at a spa in “Water Woes,” but when the water supply suddenly stops flowing, Hacker and the other patrons are left out to dry. Then, trouble is brewing beneath Serene Greens, the cybersite greenery. Hapo the earthworm needs help underground, and the CyberSquad must figure out what is happening to their small friend’s home in “Soil Turmoil.”

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“Nature Cat Vol. 10” is coming Nov. 13. Nature Cat and his pals want to take their lava game to a whole new level for the amateur volcanologist club in “Tally Ho! A Volcano!/No Rest For The Squeeky.” The only problem is that for their plan to work, they will need to find an active volcano. Then, Squeeks thinks she will be able to spend her whole night skateboarding, doing karate, and yodeling instead of sleeping. In “Amber Rocks/The Big Stink,” Daisy collects garbage at the beach and finds an orange nugget among the rocks. Could the little nugget be a piece of amber? Plus, Squeeks stumbles upon a patch of mysterious looking mushrooms in Ronald’s backyard, and Nature Cat and his pals celebrate midsummer — a magical time to celebrate the growing season with all the new life that it brings, in “A Magical Mushroom Mystery Tour/A Midsummer’s Day Dream.”

“Xavier Riddle and The Secret Museum, Volume 5” debuts Nov. 20. Xavier Riddle, his sister Yadina, and their friend Brad travel back in time via the Secret Museum to learn how to solve their everyday problems by learning lessons from real-life inspirational figures, when they were still kids. Each adventure helps children ages 4 to 7 make connections between the character skills that made these historical figures into heroes and those same qualities within themselves.

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“Elinor Wonders Why Vol. 4” comes out Nov. 27. Elinor and her friends have more fun curious adventures in this new volume of episodes. While walking through the forest, Elinor and friends come across a stream and decide to make a stone walkway to cross it in “Water You Doing?/Thinking About Blinking.” Then, Ari is crowned the blinking champion after winning a bunch of intense staring contests at school. In “Follow That Roly Poly/Rain, Rain Don’t Go Away,” the Exploring Club searches for somewhere super cool to explore when they find a Roly Poly that leads them on their next adventure: discovering bugs under a log. Also, when the kids’ fun gets cut short by weather, they start to wonder why it needs to rain at all. In “Make Music Naturally/Light The Way,” the kids learn that Señor Tapir is putting on a concert. They want to participate, but don’t have any instruments. Then, the kids are camping out, but after Elinor’s Dad falls asleep, they must find a way to communicate quietly. Plus, the pals wonder why people sneeze, and they play in a big soccer game in “These Sneezes/Ari’s Lucky Shirt.”

New Hugh Laurie Series ‘Roadkill’ Among Titles Coming to PBS Masterpiece Prime Video Channel in November

Six new programs, including a new political thriller starring Hugh Laurie, “Roadkill,” Prince Philip: The Plot to Make a King and season one of “Jekyll and Hyde,” will be streaming on the PBS Masterpiece Prime Video Channel in November.

Also streaming are international programs from “Walter Presents,” including the new Spanish crime thriller “Under Suspicion,” “The Hunter” and “Berlin Dance School.”

The subscription rate for the PBS Masterpiece Prime Video Channel is $5.99 per month with an Amazon Prime or Prime Video subscription.

Due Nov. 1 is the new political thriller “Roadkill” from Academy Award nominee David Hare (The Reader, The Hours). The series stars Hugh Laurie as Peter Laurence, a self-made forceful and charismatic politician. Peter’s public and private life seem to be falling apart — or rather are being picked apart by his enemies. As his personal revelations spiral, he is shamelessly untroubled by guilt or remorse, expertly walking a high wire between glory and catastrophe as he seeks to further his own agenda, while others plot to bring him down. However, events show just how hard it is, for both an individual and a country, to leave the past behind. Helen McCrory (The Queen, “Harry Potter”), Sidse Babett Knudsen (“Westworld, Inferno) and Millie Brady (“The Last Kingdom,” Pride and Prejudice and Zombies) also star.

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Coming Nov. 6 is season two of the “Walter Presents” series “The Hunter.” In the Italian crime drama set in January 1996, after years of waiting, arrests and sleepless nights, anti-mafia prosecutor Saverio is over the moon. Not only has he finally married the love of his life Giada, he’s also closer to catching his most wanted prey: Giovanni Brusca. The brutal head of the Cosa Nostra has held the son of one of his enemies hostage for over two years. Even though the boy is still alive, he’s just a pawn in a sick game of thrones played by the Brusca brothers. When things go wrong during Saverio’s long-planned raid of the Brusca hideout, his life starts falling apart before his eyes.

Due Nov. 13 is the “Walter Presents” Spanish crime thriller “Under Suspicion.” In the series, on the day of her first communion, surrounded by her family, 7-year-old Alicia Vega disappears without a trace. After two weeks of searching, the police are only sure about one thing: Alicia’s kidnapper is a family member. Two officers, Laura and Víctor, are chosen to go undercover in the town where the Vega family lives as a married couple to uncover who is responsible for the crime. They don’t know each other and are complete opposites. Laura is firm and organized. Víctor is impulsive and willing to do whatever is necessary to discover the truth. As time passes, the case turns out to be more complicated than they expected — the Vega family is a web of secrets complicating the rescue of Alicia.

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Season two of the “Walter Presents” German drama “Berlin Dance School,” due Nov. 27, continues to follow the proprietor of the Galant dance school, Caterina Schollack and her three daughters, Monika, Eva and Helga. Three years have passed and Monika is now a single mother fighting for custody of her daughter Dorli who is living with her aunt Helga and her husband Wolfgang as a way to hide his homosexuality. Meanwhile, the careers of Monika and her dance partner Freddy pick up speed under the stewardship of Caterina’s management. Their sister Eva is also unhappy in her marriage to Professor Fassbender. The program follows the three sisters as they search for their own new identity, while dealing with issues such as emancipation, family structures and the desire for female self-determination.

Also coming Nov. 27 is Prince Philip: The Plot to Make a King. The film tells the inside story of the tensions that were unleashed when the queen fell in love with Prince Philip — tensions that would place huge strain on the royal marriage and would shape the future of Elizabeth’s reign. Young Philip, it was felt, was “rough, ill-mannered, uneducated and would probably not be faithful,” according to one courtier. The royal and political elite disliked his German roots — and they disliked his larger than life, ferociously ambitious uncle Lord Louis Mountbatten. This film draws on unpublished memoirs to show how Philip and Mountbatten were maneuvering for a royal marriage as early as the winter of 1939-40, when the queen was just 13. Philip’s German links were a source of anxiety for Elizabeth’s parents with the queen’s mother reported to have privately referred to Philip as “The Hun.” The film reveals, for the first time, the complexities and frustrations of the royal marriage as the queen struggled to reconcile the love of her husband with the suspicions of her family and her government.

Finally, Nov. 30 comes season one of “Jekyll and Hyde.” Set in 1930s London, the series follows Robert Jekyll, a naive, sensitive young man finding his place in the world and moving away from the protection of his loving foster parents. As he begins to feel himself coming under the power of a darkness he cannot control, he realizes that all this time his parents were protecting him from his true self. Jekyll has inherited the curse of his grandfather, and when angered or in danger he undertakes a graphic and twisted transformation to become Hyde, a shadowy, brooding figure of incredible strength and agility — confident and fearless. As he tries to discover his past and search for a cure, Robert Jekyll is drawn deep into Hyde’s world of monstrous creatures and freaks of nature.

‘Frontline: The Choice 2020,’ ‘And She Could Be Next’ Among Political Titles Available on PBS Documentaries Prime Channel

PBS Distribution is streaming several political titles on the PBS Documentaries Prime Video Channel in time for the upcoming Nov. 3 election.

Among the titles available are Frontline: The Choice 2020, American Experience: The Vote, And She Could Be Next, Ken Burns: The Congress, American Experience: The Presidents and Frontline: Whose Vote Counts.

The subscription rate for PBS Documentaries Prime Video Channel is $3.99 per month with an Amazon Prime or Prime Video subscription.

Frontline: The Choice 2020 offers interwoven investigative biographies of President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden and examines the defining moments that shaped Trump and Biden’s lives, their approaches to power, and their visions for America’s future at this pivotal juncture.

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One hundred years after the passage of the 19th Amendment, American Experience: The Vote tells the dramatic story of the hard-fought campaign waged by American women for the right to vote, a transformative cultural and political movement that resulted in the largest expansion of voting rights in U.S. history. In its final decade, from 1909 to 1920, movement leaders wrestled with contentious questions about the most effective methods for affecting social change, debating the use of militant, even violent tactics, as well as hunger strikes and relentless public protests. The battle also upended previously accepted ideas about the proper role of women in American society and challenged the definitions of citizenship and democracy. Exploring how and why millions of 20th-century Americans mobilized for — and against — women’s suffrage, The Vote brings to life the unsung leaders of the movement and the deep controversies over gender roles and race that divided Americans then — and continue to dominate political discourse today.

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And She Could Be Next follows a defiant movement of women of color as they transform politics from the ground up. Filmed during the historic 2018 midterm elections, the series follows organizers and candidates (including Rashida Tlaib and Stacey Abrams) as they fight for a truly reflective government, asking whether democracy can be preserved — and made stronger — by those most marginalized.

In Ken Burns: The Congress, Burns profiles a durable American institution in his portrait of the U.S. Congress. Narrated by David McCullough, the film uses historic footage and interviews with “insiders” David Broder, Alistair Cooke and Cokie Roberts to detail the first 200 years. The film chronicles careers of notable members and charts the continuing growth of the Capitol building, in readings from diary entries, letters and famous speeches.

American Experience: The Presidents, including JFK, Nixon, George W. Bush, Clinton and George H. W. Bush, includes five programs taking a look at some of America’s most influential presidents of the 20th century. Focusing on the intersection of public and private, character and history, these programs examine pivotal moments in each of the presidencies and how they affected the country. Viewers will look at George W. Bush and his unorthodox road to the presidency; George H. W. Bush and his life and career as the 41st president; Clinton and his meteoric rise in state politics; JFK, with a new perspective on his private life and reevaluation of his time in the Oval Office; and Nixon, with a look at one of American history’s most powerful figures, exploring a fateful mix of strength and weakness that made him president, and then brought him down.

Finally, Frontline: Whose Vote Counts, available Oct. 21, investigates allegations of voter fraud and disenfranchisement in the lead-up to the 2020 election.

Docs on Current Events, Issues Added to PBS Documentaries Prime Video Channel

PBS Distribution in October will be adding a number titles focusing on current events and issues to the PBS Documentaries Prime Video Channel, including Frontline: America Unprotected: The Medical Supply Crisis, Latino Vote: Dispatches From the Battleground, Frontline: Race, Poverty and the Pandemic, Frontline: Battle for Hong Kong and Frontline: Amazon Empire — The Rise and Reign of Jeff Bezos.

The subscription rate for the PBS Documentaries Prime Video Channel is $5.99 per month with an Amazon Prime or Prime Video subscription.

Frontline: Race, Poverty and the Pandemic, which premiered Sept. 9, covers the effects of George Floyd’s death beneath the knee of a police officer, which has sparked grief and rage in the streets of Minneapolis and across the country. Jelani Cobb, a historian, professor of journalism at Columbia University and writer at The New Yorker examines a connection between George Floyd’s death and the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 deaths among African-Americans. Cobb helps put this volatile moment in context, explaining why we’ve reached a boiling point, and what he says needs to happen now. Cobb describes how the relationship between black Americans and the police has become a “barometer” for race relations in the country, drawing on his years of covering explosive tensions that he says are “overwhelmingly” in response to an issue of police use of force. “Once you looked at the way that policing functioned, it was almost an indicator of the way lots of other institutions were functioning in those communities,” he says. This time — as the nation battles a highly infectious outbreak — the outrage is spreading in a way that seems different, he says.

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Frontline: Battle for Hong Kong, which premiered Sept. 9, covers the unrest in Hong Kong. In 2019, a controversial extradition bill that would allow criminal suspects to be sent for trial in mainland China sparked a massive and unprecedented pro-democracy movement in Hong Kong. At the start, the vast majority of protesters were peaceful, but a few tried to take on the police. The documentary traces what happened next. With remarkable access, the program follows five young protesters through intense and escalating clashes with Hong Kong’s police. The protesters say they’re fighting for their freedom against the communist government of China, which is due to take complete control of Hong Kong in 2047. China, meanwhile, says the protestors are “radicals,” “thugs” and “separatists.” The film tells the story of the eight-month, youth-driven pro-democracy movement through the eyes of the protesters. They are transformed — and, in some cases, radicalized — by their experiences. As the program unfolds, viewers meet Momo, a nurse in her late twenties; Vincent, a high school student who grew up in mainland China; Lomi, a researcher; Li, a young man who is married with a daughter; and Agnes, a veteran pro-democracy protestor. Through the stories of these five young people, the documentary explores the aims and motivations of the protesters. Amid concerns about China’s growing influence in Hong Kong, the extradition bill (which was eventually withdrawn) struck a nerve. Ultimately, the film sheds new light on what both the movement and the authorities’ response to it portend for Hong Kong’s future.

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Frontline: Amazon Empire — The Rise and Reign of Jeff Bezos, which premiered Sept. 9, covers the rise of the tycoon. Amazon’s Bezos built a business empire that is unprecedented in the history of American capitalism — delivering endless products, entertainment services and technology innovations to customers with just a click of a button. But what is the cost of Amazon’s convenience? The documentary examines Amazon and Bezos’ ascent to power — and his ability to shape everything from the future of work, to the future of commerce, to the future of technology. From award-winning filmmakers James Jacoby and Anya Bourg (The Facebook Dilemma), the documentary draws on interviews with current top executives and former insiders, as well as regulators and critics, raising tough questions about Bezos and the empire he built. Through these interviews, Jacoby and Bourg’s investigation presents an inside look at who Bezos is, and how he transformed a tiny company run out of a garage into a staple of American consumerism that critics contend is willing to dominate the market at all costs.

Frontline: America Unprotected: The Medical Supply Crisis, which premieres Oct. 7, explores questions around readiness for the epidemic. Why was the U.S. left scrambling for critical medical equipment as the coronavirus swept the country? With the Associated Press the documentary investigates the fragmented global medical supply chain and its deadly consequences for Americans.

Latino Vote: Dispatches From the Battleground, which premieres Oct. 7, explores how voters in Nevada, Texas, Florida and Pennsylvania could very well determine the next American president. One of the top priorities on both sides of the political divide is to engage Latino voters. Projected to be the largest voting-eligible ethnicity in the country, Latino voters are often sought after by both Republicans and Democrats as if they are a monolith. With both younger Latinos and new citizens joining the ranks of registered voters across the country, the growing magnitude of this cross-section of the electorate has clear political implications for the 2020 presidential election. But trying to woo voters based on their cultural similarities without factoring in their complex and varying individual interests could prove to be a losing game plan. Following activists, organizers and others who are working to maximize Latino turnout in their local communities while simultaneously devoting their efforts to COVID-19 relief as the pandemic surges, the program delves into the high-stakes fight to activate Latino votes in these battleground states and give voices to newly registered Latino voters themselves about what the galvanizing issues are for them.

PBS Masterpiece Launches on Amazon Prime Video Channels for Canada

PBS Distribution Sept. 15 launched its streaming channel PBS Masterpiece on Amazon Prime Video Channels for Canada.

“We have seen tremendous consumer demand and subscription growth since we launched PBS Masterpiece on Amazon Prime Video Channels in the United States in May of 2017,” Andrea Downing, co-president of PBS Distribution, said in a statement. “This expansion allows our committed and loyal Masterpiece fan base in Canada to enjoy these high-quality, award winning programs whenever they like.”

The channel launches with popular Masterpiece programs such as “Sanditon,” “Endeavour,” “Home Fires,” “Inspector Lewis,” “Poldark” and “Victoria.”

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In addition to Masterpiece programming, the channel will also offer titles from the Walter Presents library of series from countries all over the world, subtitled in English, marking the debut of Walter Presents programs to Canadian audiences. Titles include the highest-rated drama in Denmark, “Seaside Hotel,” and crime thriller/mysteries “Professor T,” “Though Shall Not Kill” and “Before we Die,” among many others.

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“I am genuinely thrilled to be launching Walter Presents in Canada, with its rich, bi-lingual culture and its history of active engagement with the world as well as its long-standing appreciation of world drama,” said Walter Iuzzolino, co-founder and curator of Walter Presents, in a statement. “I know Canadian audiences will embrace our collection of quality, award-winning series with a sense of curiosity and with real gusto.”

The subscription rate for PBS Masterpiece in Canada will be CDN $6.99 per month plus applicable taxes with an Amazon Prime membership.

PBS Appoints Marketing VP

PBS Distribution has been appointed Tonya Harley VP of marketing.

Harley will lead marketing and communications, supporting multiple brands and businesses, with a focus on customer acquisition and retention strategies for the company’s direct-to-consumer subscription businesses — PBS Masterpiece, PBS Kids, PBS Living and newly launched PBS Documentaries — on Prime Video Channels.

“Tonya is an Emmy-award winning marketing professional with a proven track record of successfully delivering results for clients that exceed expectations,” PBS Distribution co-president Andrea Downing said in a statement. “She brings keen analytical skills and experience across a wide range of industries, and her ability to create targeted and efficient media plans to drive acquisition across broadcast and digital platforms will support our key primary initiatives perfectly.”

Harley joins PBS Distribution from BCD Travel, where she led their hotel marketing team as the director of strategic marketing. She was responsible for building a modern brand identity, designing social media campaigns to drive engagement, and overseeing the creative development, social media, content development, sales training, and public relations to support product launches.

Prior to working for BCD Travel, Harley was a senior marketing strategist with Advito. During her five years there, she built a strategic vision for developing digital products to help clients reduce travel costs while building client retention and loyalty, and led a cross-functional team in creating the product strategy, positioning, and marketing plan to drive new business.

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Before joining Advito, she spent five years at Liberty Mutual Insurance, culminating in the role of manager of national advertising. She was responsible for more than $125 million in creative and media spend, focusing on the strategy and creative development of brand television, direct-response television, and digital and field marketing. Harley built the first-ever marketing portal for field sales agents to create brand consistency across the organization while helping agents leverage marketing tactics to boost sales.

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Early in her career, Harley’s experiences were rooted in client management at Argus Communications, where she developed omni-channel marketing campaigns for her clients. She saw her strategic recommendation come to life as a television ad that was nominated and won a National Academy of Arts & Sciences Emmy Award for “Outstanding Community or Public Service Single Spot” TV.

PBS Launches PBS Documentaries Prime Video Channel

PBS Distribution Aug. 4 will launch a new documentary-focused Prime Video Channel called PBS Documentaries.

The subscription rate for the PBS Documentaries Prime Video Channel, which allows access to PBS content outside the PBS Video App, is $3.99 per month with an Amazon Prime or Prime Video subscription via Prime Video Channels and is available in the United States only.

The PBS Documentaries Prime Video Channel library will include the entire Ken Burns collection as well as programs from “Nova,” “Frontline,” “American Masters,” “Nature,” “American Experience,” “Independent Lens,” “POV” and many independent producers.

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“PBS is the leader of high-quality, compelling nonfiction entertainment, and the PBS Documentaries Prime Video Channel is a natural addition to our current streaming offering on Prime Video Channels — PBS Masterpiece, PBS Living and PBS Kids,” Andrea Downing, co-president of PBS Distribution, said in a statement. “This channel will not only help bring engaging stories about life in all corners of our country to a new audience, it will provide needed revenues to sustain public broadcasting’s public-private partnership model for the benefit of all stations and the communities they serve.”

The entire Ken Burns collection will also be available via PBS Passport, a member benefit available within the PBS Video App.

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“We had long hoped to be able to have all of our films available in one place so the public would have access to the body of work,” added Ken Burns in a statement. “We’re thrilled that this is now possible thanks to the efforts of PBS Distribution and Amazon to launch the PBS Documentaries Prime Video Channel and also through PBS’s Passport initiative that allows viewers to support their public television stations. Both will also contribute to the larger mission of PBS.”

“’Frontline’ was founded on the belief that long-form documentaries could inform, educate and inspire public television’s audiences — and during these historic times, deeply reported and easily accessible journalism is invaluable,” “Frontline” executive producer Raney Aronson-Rath said in a statement. “Through this new channel, we’re excited to see our documentaries reach new and existing streaming audiences.”

At launch, the channel will feature nearly 1,000 hours of programming, including Ken Burns’ series The Civil War and Country Music, Stanley Nelson’s The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution and Academy Award-Nominated films such as “Frontline’s” For Sama and American Experiences Last Days in Vietnam.

“I’m thrilled to see that my work will find a new home on this channel,” Nelson said in a statement. “PBS has become a premier destination for documentary programming in the U.S. and has been hugely invested in giving films by diverse storytellers and emerging filmmakers much-needed national exposure. I’m so glad that my film on the Black Panther Party, which can inform communities in our current historical moment, will be able to reach different audiences on this new service.”

‘Somewhere South,’ ‘Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street’ and ‘Mind of a Chef’ Streaming on PBS Living Channel in March

PBS Distribution is bowing seasons of three cooking shows in March on the PBS Living Prime Video Channel: six episodes of the new series “Somewhere South,” the third season of “Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street” and the first two seasons of “The Mind of a Chef.”

The subscription rate for the PBS Living Prime Video Channel is $2.99 a month with an Amazon Prime or Prime Video subscription. PBS Living is also available on Apple TV Channels in the Apple TV app at a subscription rate of $2.99 a month with no additional annual fees.

Available now are seasons one and two of “The Mind of a Chef,” combining travel, cooking, history, science, and humor into one culinary journey. The series goes inside the kitchen and mind of acclaimed chefs from around the globe. Examining the intricacies of what it takes to become a remarkable chef, season one, narrated by Anthony Bourdain, follows David Chang who has earned almost every major cooking award. Chang travels to Japan to speak about his ramen roots and then to Montreal with comedian Aziz Ansari to satiate his thirst for culinary inspiration. Season two is split into two parts, following chefs Sean Brock and April Bloomfield, with eight episodes on each. Brock is renowned for his expansion and preservation of traditional Southern cooking traditions and through extensive historical research, his cuisine has shined a spotlight on the varieties of crops that once made America the envy of the world. British-born Bloomfield got drunk with friends the night before her police academy exam and overslept her chance to join the force, eventually leading to April becoming known as one of the most innovative chefs of her generation. April wrestles with the demands of opening a new restaurant, tests menu ideas, obsesses over ingredients, and cooks with her mentors and contemporaries.

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Due March 23 is season three of “Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street,” in which Kimball and his team travel the globe searching for techniques and ingredients that can transform home cooking, producing better dishes and in less time. Viewers travel along from the very first bite to a perfectly executed recipe. The team travels to Mexico, Lebanon, France, Thailand, Italy, Australia and many other countries. They might find a new way to use spices, a simpler way to cook chicken, a fresh combination of spices or tricks and techniques that turn classic dishes into something a little more unique.

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Coming March 28 are six episodes of the new show “Somewhere South,” in which celebrity chef, author, restaurateur and award-winning host for PBS’ “A Chef’s Life,” Vivian Howard, hosts a culinary journey that explores the cultural twists on classic dishes and new traditions that are being formed in the American South. Howard examines popular dishes such as dumplings, hand pies, porridge and many others and speaks on how these dishes change from culture to culture. In North Carolina, Howard tries the collard sandwich, a staple of Lumbee Indian cuisine in the Carolinas. Then she goes to West Virginia to eat pepperoni rolls, a dish inspired by coal miners. She travels to Charleston, where rice is king, and enjoys grits along with other rice dishes that are among the favorites of South Carolina’s bustling food scene.

 

Percentage of U.S. Households With Multiple OTT Subs Has Jumped by 130% Since 2014

The percentage of U.S. households with multiple OTT subscriptions has increased by 130% since 2014, according to Parks Associates research.

In 2019, 46% of U.S. broadband households subscribe to two or more OTT services. The report, Partnering, Aggregation, and Bundling in Video Services found only 33% subscribed to multiple services in early 2017 and 20% in 2014.

“The number of OTT services available in the U.S. increased by 140% in five years, giving consumers an unprecedented number of options to meet their video needs,” said Parks Associates senior analyst Steve Nason in a statement. “Most OTT households are anchored by one of the three major OTT services — Netflix, Hulu, or Amazon Prime Video — but consumers are finding they can’t fulfill all their interests through a single service. Many small and medium-sized services are building their brand and subscriber base by filling in these gaps in content.”

Several trends in the video services industry are shaping partnerships, including intense competition, the move of content providers to launch direct-to-consumer offerings, the lack of differentiation among OTT services, and the existing infrastructure and consumer relationships among larger players, according to Parks.

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While overall adoption and awareness of OTT video services as a category are high, awareness of any specific individual service is low, which will make it difficult for smaller services to match the scale, revenues, and marketing efforts of larger players, according to the research firm.

Parks Associates research shows nearly three in 10 OTT services in the United States are on Amazon’s Prime Video Channels aggregation platform, more than four times the rate from two years ago.

“Netflix can afford to license high-value content like ‘Seinfeld’ to supplement its original content, and Apple can buy commercial space during the Emmys and NFL games to promote its upcoming Apple TV+ service and its array of content and stars,” Nason said in a statement. “By contrast, smaller OTT services are having to harness the power of a partnership with an aggregator, bundling or content partner, or marketing and promotion partner to boost awareness of their brand and offerings.”

Additional findings include:

  • More than half (53%) of U.S. broadband households subscribe to at least one OTT service and a pay-TV service;
  • Nearly three-quarters subscribe to an OTT video service, up from 52% in 2014; and
  • Among the OTT video services available in the United States, approximately 90 have fewer than 50,000 subscribers and 72 have fewer than 20,000.