Universal Pictures Continues Redbox Chart Streak With ‘Halloween’

Universal Pictures continues its run on top of the Redbox charts, with the latest installment in the gruesome “Halloween” horror movie franchise debuting at No. 1 on both charts the week ended Jan. 20.

Halloween, the 11th installment that began with the 1978 original also called Halloween, topped both the Redbox kiosk chart, which tracks DVD and Blu-ray Disc rentals at the company’s more than 40,000 red vending machines, and the Redbox On Demand chart, which tracks transactional video-on-demand (TVOD), both electronic sellthrough (EST) and streaming.

The new Halloween earned nearly 160 million in North American theaters. It comes full circle, following Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) 40 years after she survived Michael Myers’ initial killing spree chronicled in the first movie.

Halloween bumped another Universal Pictures film, Night School, out of the No. 1 spot it had held for the past three weeks on the Redbox disc-rental chart and two weeks on the Redbox On Demand digital chart.

The Kevin Hart-starring comedy, which earned $77.3 million in North American theaters, slipped to No. 3 on both charts.

Debuting at No. 2 on both charts was another new release, Goosebumps 2, from Sony Pictures. Like Halloween, Goosebumps 2 was released theatrically in time for Halloween. A sequel to 2015’s Goosebumps, the followup racked up a $46.7 million domestic gross.

Venom, a superhero film based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name, slipped to No. 4 from No. 2 on the kiosk chart, and to No. 6 from No. 4 on the digital chart.

Rounding out the top five on the Redbox disc-rental chart was a third new release, Speed Kills, from Lionsgate. The film stars John Travolta as a rich speedboat racing champion who leads a double life that gets him in hot water with both the police and a team of drug lords. It’s the latest in a string of theatrical flops starring the one-time ‘A’ list star.

On the Redbox On Demand digital chart, Lionsgate’s A Simple Favor moved back up to No. 4 from No. 6 the prior week, while the No. 5 spot went to 20th Century Fox’s Bad Times at the El Royale, down two spots from the previous week.

A fourth new release, Warner’s A Star is Born, debuted at No. 8 on the Redbox digital chart. The film – which received eight Oscar nominations, including a nod for “Best Picture,” won’t be available on DVD and Blu-ray Disc until Feb. 19.

 

Top DVD and Blu-ray Disc Rentals, Redbox Kiosks, Week Ending January 20

  1. Halloween (2018, new)
  2. Goosebumps 2 (new)
  3. Night School
  4. Venom
  5. Speed Kills (new)
  6. White Boy Rick
  7. The Equalizer 2
  8. The House With a Clock in its Walls
  9. Smallfoot
  10. Peppermint

 

Top Digital, Redbox On Demand, Week Ending January 20

  1. Halloween (2018, new)
  2. Goosebumps 2 (new)
  3. Night School
  4. A Simple Favor
  5. Bad Times at the El Royale
  6. Venom
  7. The Old Man & The Gun
  8. A Star is Born (2018, new)
  9. The Equalizer 2
  10. White Boy Rick

 

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Kevin Hart-Starring ‘Night School’ Scores Double Win at Redbox

Universal Pictures’ Night School scored a double win at Redbox in the first week of the new year.

The Kevin Hart-starring comedy, which earned $77.3 million in North American theaters, remained at No. 1 for the second consecutive week on the Redbox kiosk chart, which tracks DVD and Blu-ray Disc rentals at the company’s more than 40,000 red vending machines.

The film also knocked Sony Pictures’ Venom out of the No. 1 spot on the Redbox On Demand chart, which tracks transactional video-on-demand (TVOD), both electronic sellthrough (EST) and transactional streaming.

Venom, a superhero film based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name, was No. 2 on both charts.

Night School’s lingering popularity might be due in part to the controversy surrounding Hart, who in December was briefly tapped to host the 2019 Academy Awards. After being blasted for homophobic jokes and tweets he made more than eight years ago, the Academy asked him to apologize; he ultimately stepped down as host.

In Night School, Hart portrays a successful salesman who sees his life turned around after getting fired for accidentally destroying his workplace. Forced to attend night school so he can finally get his GED and find another job, he soon finds himself amongst a group of misfit students, a teacher with no patience for class clowns (Tiffany Haddish) and his high school nemesis-turned-principal (Taran Killam) who will strive to make sure he fails the course.

Universal Pictures’ The House With a Clock in its Walls, a family fantasy about a young boy who is sent to live with his uncle in a spooky old house, moved back up to No. 3 on both charts from No. 5 the prior week.

The Sony Pictures revenge thriller sequel Equalizer 2 remained at No. 4 on both charts for the second consecutive week.

Rounding out the top five on the Redbox disc-rental chart was The Predator, from 20th Century Fox, down two spots from its No. 3 debut the prior week.

The No. 5 spot on the Redbox digital chart went to Lionsgate’s A Simple Favor, also down from No. 3 the previous week.

The sole new release to chart at Redbox the week that ended Jan. 6 was A-X-L, a science-fiction adventure from Global Road Entertainment that debuted on the kiosk chart only at No. 10. The film only earned $8.2 million in domestic theaters against a reported budget of $10 million.

 

Top DVD and Blu-ray Disc Rentals, Redbox Kiosks, Week Ending January 6

  1. Night School
  2. Venom
  3. The House With a Clock in its Walls
  4. The Equalizer 2
  5. The Predator
  6. White Boy Rick
  7. Peppermint
  8. Smallfoot
  9. A Simple Favor
  10. A-X-L (new)

 

Top Digital, Redbox On Demand, Week Ending January 6

  1. Night School
  2. Venom
  3. The House With a Clock in its Walls
  4. The Equalizer 2
  5. A Simple Favor
  6. Mission: Impossible – Fallout
  7. Peppermint
  8. White Boy Rick
  9. Smallfoot
  10. The Predator

 

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‘Night School,’ ‘Venom’ Top Redbox Charts

It was a split decision at Redbox the week ended Dec. 30.

Universal Pictures’ Night School, a comedy starring Kevin Hart that earned $77.3 million in North American theaters, debuted at No. 1 on the Redbox kiosk chart, which tracks DVD and Blu-ray Disc rentals at the company’s more than 40,000 red vending machines.

Sony Pictures’ Venom, a superhero film based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name, remained on top of the Redbox On Demand chart for the second consecutive week. The Redbox On Demand chart tracks transactional video-on-demand (TVOD), both electronic sellthrough (EST) and transactional streaming.

Night School debuted at No. 2 on the Redbox On Demand chart. In the film, a successful salesman (Hart) sees his life turned around after getting fired for accidentally destroying his workplace. Forced to attend night school so he can finally get his GED and find another job, he soon finds himself amongst a group of misfit students, a teacher with no patience for class clowns (Tiffany Haddish) and his high school nemesis-turned-principal (Taran Killam) who will strive to make sure he fails the course.

Venom, with a domestic gross of $213 million 2018’s No. 10 movie, slipped to No. 2 on the Redbox disc-rental chart its second week in kiosks.

The Predator, from 20th Century Fox, debuted at No. 3 on the Redbox kiosk chart while slipping to No. 7 from No. 6 the prior week on the Redbox On Demand chart.

Rounding out the top five on the Redbox disc-rental chart were the Sony Pictures revenge thriller The Equalizer 2 at No. 4, down from No. 3 the prior week, and Universal Pictures’ The House With a Clock in its Walls at No. 5. The latter, a family fantasy about a young boy who is sent to live with his uncle in a spooky old house, had debuted at No. 2 the previous week.

Another new release, Sony Pictures’ White Boy Rick, debuted at No. 7 on the kiosk chart. The film, a biographical crime drama about the youngest-ever FBI informant, earned $24 million in theaters after debuting at the Telluride Film Festival.

On the Redbox On Demand digital chart, Lionsgate’s A Simple Favor, a black comedy about a vlogger who tries to solve the disappearance of her rich and mysterious best friend, slipped to No. 3 after bowing at No. 2 the prior week.

The Equalizer 2 finished the week at No. 4 followed at No. 5 by The House With a Clock in its Walls. Both films slipped a spot from the prior week.

White Boy Rick came in at No. 6 on the Redbox On Demand digital chart.

 

Top DVD and Blu-ray Disc Rentals, Redbox Kiosks, Week Ending December 30

  1. Night School (new)
  2. Venom
  3. The Predator (new)
  4. The Equalizer 2
  5. The House With a Clock in its Walls
  6. Smallfoot
  7. White Boy Rick (new)
  8. Peppermint
  9. A Simple Favor
  10. Mission: Impossible – Fallout

 

Top Digital, Redbox On Demand, Week Ending December 30

  1. Venom
  2. Night School
  3. A Simple Favor
  4. The Equalizer 2
  5. The House With a Clock in its Walls
  6. White Boy Rick
  7. Peppermint
  8. The Predator
  9. Mission: Impossible – Fallout
  10. Smallfoot

 

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A Simple Favor

While a movie based on a dark mystery thriller novel might seem like an odd choice for a director known primarily for comedy, Paul Feig is able to deliver an entertaining adaptation of Darcey Bell’s A Simple Favor filled with plenty of twists and turns, driven by a pair of winning performances from his leading ladies, Anna Kendrick and Blake Lively.

 

 

BLU-RAY REVIEW:

Lionsgate;
Thriller;
Box Office $53.55 million;
$29.95 DVD, $39.99 Blu-ray, $42.99 UHD BD;
Rated ‘R’ for sexual content and language throughout, some graphic nude images, drug use and violence.
Stars Anna Kendrick, Blake Lively, Henry Golding, Andrew Rannells, Linda Cardellini, Jean Smart, Rupert Friend, Bashir Salahuddin, Joshua Satine, Ian Ho.

A Simple Favor exists in a strange Venn diagram where the dark mystery thriller aspects of Darcey Bell’s source material novel intersect with the broad comedic sensibilities of the film’s director, Paul Feig. The result is an oddly compelling mystery filled with its fair share of plot twists, intrigue and genuine laughs.

Anna Kendrick plays Stephanie, an all-too-sincere mommy blogger who runs a DIY video channel and seems to embody the usual quirks of a Kendrick character. Her worldview is suddenly challenged when she meets the bitchy Emily (Blake Lively), mother of her son’s schoolmate, and the two ladies unexpectedly hit it off over martinis.

One day, Emily asks Stephanie to watch her son after school, and promptly disappears. Days later, Emily’s body seemingly turns up in a lake near her childhood home, setting off all sorts of question about what she was up to. Stephanie, meanwhile, consoles Emily’s husband (Henry Golding), and as they grow closer, they seem to be haunted by Emily, who, it turns out, may not be so dead after all.

In his first directorial effort after the misstep of Ghostbusters: Answer the Call, Feig largely succeeds in maintaining a darkly comic tone throughout, buoyed by a strong cast. Kendrick and Lively give terrific performances as the unlikely friends. Lively in particular dominates the screen in her early scenes, establishing the kind of dominant personality necessary to draw out Stephanie’s meekness and force her to come into her own.

Feig’s intention to make a “fun thriller” ensures the film is never as dark or serious as similar fare such as Gone Girl. If anything, it could almost be seen as a parody of the absurdity of such stories if it weren’t taking itself just seriously enough. Still, in the various bonus materials in which Feig is quite ubiquitous he seems rather flippant about some of his directorial choices, none more so than his alternative to a big, Bollywood-style dance number meant to play during the credits.

The bonus section includes three separate commentaries, and Feig is involved in all of them. The first is the director by himself, relating his own experiences of making the film. The second is Feig with members of the cast, including Kendrick, Lively, Jean Smart (who plays Lively’s mom) and Bashir Salahuddin, who plays a detective. A third commentary finds Feig with screenwriter Jessica Sharzer, producer Jessie Henderson, cinematographer John Schwartzman and costume designer Renée Ehrlich Kalfus.

The filmmaker commentary obviously delves into more of the technical aspects of the production, while the cast commentary is more of a fun discussion about the making of the film, and thus is the more enjoyable of the three.

Having a comedic director such as Paul Feig adapt a mystery thriller novel seems like an odd choice

The disc also includes more than 16 minutes of deleted scenes, including the aforementioned dance scene that was cut for essentially trivializing a story about two strong female characters.

There’s also a three-and-a-half minute gag reel and eight behind-the-scenes featurettes running about an hour in total.

A Simple Favor

‘Venom’ Debuts at No. 1 on Redbox Disc Rental and Digital Charts

Sony Pictures’ Venom, a superhero film based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name, topped both Redbox charts the week ended Dec. 23.

With a domestic gross of $213 million the year’s No. 10 movie, Venom debuted at No. 1 on both the Redbox kiosk chart, which tracks DVD and Blu-ray Disc rentals at the company’s more than 40,000 red vending machines, as well as the Redbox On Demand digital chart, which tracks digital transactions, both electronic sellthrough (EST) and transactional video-on-demand (TVOD) streaming.

Bowing at No. 2 on the kiosk chart and No. 4 on the digital chart was another new release, Universal Pictures’ The House With a Clock in Its Walls, a family fantasy film based on the 1973 book of the same name. The film, about a young boy who is sent to live with his uncle in a spooky old house, stars Jack Black, Cate Blanchett, and Owen Vaccaro. It grossed $68.5 million in North American theaters.

Lionsgate’s A Simple Favor debuted at No. 2 on the Redbox On Demand digital chart (and No. 5 on the disc-rental chart). A black comedy about a vlogger who tries to solve the disappearance of her rich and mysterious best friend, the film stars Anna Kendrick, Blake Lively and Henry Golding and earned $53.5 million in U.S. and Canadian theaters.

The Sony Pictures revenge-thriller sequel The Equalizer 2 slipped to No. 3 on both charts, a week after its debut at No. 1.

Smallfoot, a computer-animated musical comedy-adventure from the Warner Animation Group, finished its second week of availability at No. 4 on the Redbox kiosk chart (down from No. 2) and No. 7 on the Redbox On Demand digital chart (down from No. 3).

Peppermint, another revenge thriller starring Jennifer Garner as a mom out to avenge the murder of her husband and 10-year-old daughter by a drug cartel, slipped to No. 6 from No. 3 on the disc-rental chart and No. 5 from No. 2 on the Redbox On Demand digital chart.

Holiday favorite Home Alone, from 20th Century Fox, shot up to No. 8 on the Redbox On Demand digital chart during the week before Christmas.

 

Top DVD and Blu-ray Disc Rentals, Redbox Kiosks, Week Ending December 23

  1. Venom (new)
  2. The House With a Clock in its Walls (new)
  3. The Equalizer 2
  4. Smallfoot
  5. A Simple Favor (new)
  6. Peppermint
  7. Mission: Impossible – Fallout
  8. The Nun
  9. Crazy Rich Asians
  10. Mile 22

 

Top Digital, Redbox On Demand, Week Ending December 23

  1. Venom
  2. A Simple Favor
  3. The Equalizer 2
  4. The House With a Clock in its Walls
  5. Peppermint
  6. The Predator
  7. Smallfoot
  8. Home Alone
  9. Mission: Impossible – Fallout
  10. Crazy Rich Asians

 

Visit the Redbox website.

Buy or rent Redbox On Demand movies.