Ron Sanders Exits WarnerMedia, After Storied Career, in Management Reorganization

Veteran Warner Bros. Home Entertainment executive Ron Sanders is among a group of key executives who are leaving the company in the wake of a management restructuring implemented by new WarnerMedia CEO Jason Kilar.

Sanders, president of Warner Bros. worldwide theatrical distribution, and president of Warner Bros. Home Entertainment, has been an integral part of the studio’s retail management for nearly 30 years.

Sanders joins Jeffrey Schlesinger and Kim Williams as the latest high-profile executives among a reported 600 employees let go following the Aug. 7 departure of Bob Greenblatt and Kevin Reilly.

The latest cuts were first reported by The Wrap.

Sanders was named president of worldwide distribution for the entire motion picture group in January 2018, retaining his responsibilities as home entertainment chief. In that role, which he assumed in 2013, he oversaw the global distribution of home entertainment products from Warner Bros. Pictures Group, Warner Bros. Television Group and Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment. He was also responsible for the studio’s video game publishing business, and helped build WBHE into the industry’s largest digital distributor of films and TV shows through VOD and EST.

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“Ron is an exemplary executive and Warner Bros. was lucky to have him as one of their senior leaders for so long,” said Amy Jo Smith, president and CEO of DEG: The Digital Entertainment Group, where Sanders had held several key leadership roles, including chair. “Ron played a key role in guiding and growing DEG and we will also be grateful for his involvement, his support and his scruples. He’s such a good guy.”

Sanders joined what was then Warner Home Video in 1991 and learned the business from some of the most talented executives of the day, led by then-division president Warren Lieberfarb.

“I hired Ron from Procter & Gamble, where he was a regional sales manager, and nurtured his growth,” said Warren Lieberfarb, hailed as the “father” of DVD. “I promoted him over the years, and he was eminently qualified. I am sure the future will offer him many more opportunities.”

According to a column by Media Play News publisher and editorial director Thomas K. Arnold, “The 1990s were a remarkable time in home entertainment: We saw the rise of sellthrough, the development of direct sales and, of course, the launch of DVD, birthed at Warner by Lieberfarb and his team. … Anyone who knows Ron Sanders, who has worked alongside him, knows how incredibly hard it is to dislike him. When he says something, he means it. When he makes a promise, he follows through. He looks you in the eyes when he speaks to you; he is passionate about the industry, about Warner Bros., about business, about life.”

Sanders ran Warner’s rental business during the tumultuous mid-1990s period of consolidation and copy-depth incentives. He moved into consumer sales just as DVD was taking off and in July 1998 was sent to London as managing director of the United Kingdom and Ireland divisions. A year and a half later, he was promoted to head of the entire EMEA (Europe, Middle East and Africa) region, overseeing Warner’s home video operations in 28 territories.

He returned to the United States in 2002 and was appointed president of Warner Home Video in October 2005. In May 2013 he was named president of Warner Bros. Worldwide Home Entertainment Distribution, with oversight of the global distribution of home entertainment products from Warner Bros. Pictures, Warner Bros. Television, and Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment (WBIE).

“Throughout this well-deserved rise, Sanders has remained remarkably grounded,” Arnold wrote in his column. “He and I used to swap stories about chauffeuring our kids to soccer games. … Mindful of his experience living with his family in London, Sanders endowed a study abroad program at his alma mater, Auburn University, where he also served on the Harbert College of Business Advisory Council.”

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