News

Kino Cult, Giant Expand Library With Seven ‘Midnight Classics’

Kino Cult is again expanding its library with seven “midnight classics,” presented in cooperation with Drafthouse Films. These films join a growing list of hundreds of new and rare, theatrically released cult hits, all presented in high-definition.

Kino Cult is a free, ad-supported streaming platform for horror and cult films launched in October 2021 by indie film distributors Kino Lorber and Giant Pictures, both of which landed a slot on our Top 20 Indie Power Players list for 2022.

Kino Lorber and Giant also have launched a linear FAST Channel (Free Ad-Supported TV) for Kino Cult on kinocult.com and in all associated apps. It features a curated and scheduled program of back-to-back films drawn from the channel’s library of “unapologetically weird cinema,” according to a press release.

Additionally, Kino Cult is now offering an ad-free subscription plan for $4.99 per month.

The seven new “midnight classics” are:

  • Ms. 45 (1981), directed by Abel Ferrara:  This revenge thriller classic follows a mute garment-district seamstress who, after falling victim to multiple unspeakable assaults, ignites her one-woman rampage against New York City’s entire male population.
  • Wake in Fright (1979), directed by Ted Kotcheff: Starring Donald Pleasence, Wake in Fright tells the nightmarish story of a schoolteacher’s descent into personal demoralization at the hands of drunken, deranged derelicts while stranded in a small town in outback Australia. 
  • Miami Connection (1987), directed by Richard Park and Y K Kim: This action comedy finds motorcycle ninjas tightening their grip on Florida’s narcotics trade, viciously annihilating anyone who dares move in on their turf. 
  • The Visitor (1979), directed by Giulio Paradisi: An intergalactic warrior is in battle against a demonic 8-year-old girl while the fate of the universe hangs in the balance.
  • Why Don’t You Play in Hell? (2013), directed by Sion Sono: 10 years ago, Yakuza mid-boss Ikegami led an assault against rival don Muto. Now, on the eve of his revenge, all Muto wants to do is complete his masterpiece, a feature film with his daughter in the starring role, before his wife is released from prison and The F Bombers are standing by with the chance of a lifetime: to film a real, live yakuza battle to the death … on 35mm film.
  • Raiders! (2015), directed by Jeremy Coon and Tim Skousen: After Steven Spielberg’s Raiders of the Lost Ark was released 35 years ago, three 11-year-old boys from Mississippi set out on what would become a seven-year-long labor of love and tribute to their favorite film — a faithful, shot-for-shot adaptation of the action adventure film.
  • Dangerous Men (2005), directed by Jahangir Salehi: This comic actioner by Salehi, under the pseudonym John S. Rad, took 21 years to make and release, and is filled with all sorts of sadistic debauchery. 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

1 × two =

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.