House Approves Restoring Net Neutrality

As expected, the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives April 10 voted to restore net neutrality guidelines established by the Federal Communications Commission in 2015 and repealed in 2017 under the direction of President Trump’s appointed FCC chairman Ajit Pai.

The 232-190 vote (along party lines) on the Save the Internet Act would – if approved by the Senate and signed by Trump – restore guidelines prohibiting Internet service providers such as AT&T, Comcast and Verizon from throttling consumer access to online video services and enforce regulation characterizing the Internet as a utility similar to electricity and the telephone.

“With the Save the Internet Act, Democrats are honoring the will of the people,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) said in a statement last month.

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Despite bipartisan support in the Senate, which passed (52-47) a Congressional Review Act in 2017 to overturn the FCC’s decision, approval of the House measure by the GOP-controlled Senate now seems slim.

Due to the rules of governance, passage of the CRA required a simple majority of votes. Passage of the Save the Internet Act requires 60 Senate votes (a supermajority), which the Democrats don’t have.

Indeed, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told the media the House measure would be “dead on arrival” once it is sent over.

And the White House April 8 issued a statement saying that if the bill was presented to Trump, he would be advised to veto it.

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