Federal Appeals Court Questions DOJ Economic Concerns Regarding AT&T/Time Warner Union

Federal Appeals Court judges Dec. 6 questioned lawyers representing the Department of Justice about the government’s economic concerns regarding AT&T’s $85 billion acquisition of Time Warner.

The Justice Department’s antitrust division filed an appeal of a district court judge’s June approval of the merger that resulted in the formation of WarnerMedia — citing the deal would lead to higher pay-TV pricing and content blackouts for consumers, among other issues.

Government attorney Michael Murray argued U.S. District Court Judge Richard Leon erred in “economic logic and reasoning” in relation to possible blackouts of consumer access to content occurring during carriage disputes between content holders and pay-TV and over-the-top video distributors.

“‘Incentives remain the same’ for a super company to threaten a ‘blackout,’ in which it withholds content from distributors, in order to cripple rivals,” said Murray, as reported by CNN Business.

But D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Robert Wilkins countered that there exist arbitration procedures in place for carriage disputes  — systems Wilkins said Judge Leon used in his decision.

“So how can we just ignore that and say the district court has irrationally switched positions?” asked Wilkins.

Speaking Dec. 4 the UBS 46thAnnual Global Media and Communications confab in New York, AT&T Randall Stephenson remained optimistic the appeals court would validate the merger.

Specifically, Stephenson said the appellate court is looking for errors in law, not whether the district court judge “gets the facts right or not.” He said AT&T hired appellate lawyers during the original trial to consult on the strength of their case as it applied to the rule of law.

“We feel like Judge Leon wrote a pretty tight order and it was an order that was very fact-specific to the AT&T/Time Warner case, and so we feel like we have an order that should stand up well in the appellate review,” Stephenson said. “And so, we’re anxious to get this piece of it behind us.”

 

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