eOne Acquisition, COVID-19 Weigh Heavily on Hasbro Earnings

Game manufacturer Hasbro’s aggressive move into content production and distribution continues to sting the fiscal bottom line. The company July 27 reported a second-quarter (ended June 30) loss of $33.9 million on revenue of $863 million, which was down 29% from revenue of $1.2 billion in the previous-year period.

Much of the loss came from the $3.8 billion acquisition of Entertainment One in 2019, including $8.5 million after tax of acquisition-related expenses, $10.1 million after-tax of severance charges associated with cost-savings initiatives within the Canadian company’s commercial and TV and film businesses, and $17.9 million after-tax of purchased intangible amortization associated with the deal. eOne revenue in the quarter fell 30% to $160.9 million from $231.1 million.

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Hasbro, which has licensed IP to Paramount Pictures for movie franchises “Transformers” and “G.I. Joe,” among others, said revenue from “TV, film and entertainment” dropped 32% to $132.2 million from $195.4 million — much of it due to production and distribution shutdowns caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

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“The second quarter was much as we expected: strong point of sale for Hasbro brands countered by a very challenging revenue period due to global closures in our supply chain, across retailers as well as in entertainment production,” CEO Brian Goldner said in a statement.

With the economy slowly emerging from the shutdowns, Goldner is looking forward to the winter holiday retail season. Hasbro’s biggest retail clients include Walmart, Target and Amazon.

“We believe the outlook improves from here,” Goldner said. “Consumers — children, families, fans and audiences — are relying on Hasbro brands and stories to connect and entertain themselves throughout this period.”

CFO Deborah Thomas said the gamer has a strong financial position, with more than $1 billion in cash on the balance sheet and a $1.5 billion revolving credit facility.

“We continue to see improvement as stores reopen, and we are working closely with our customers to successfully navigate this period,” Thomas said. “Working capital needs increase in the second half of the year, with early fourth quarter the peak period and we are positioned to support our plans for a good holiday season.”

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