Reviews

Encanto

4K ULTRA HD BLU-RAY REVIEW:

Disney;
Animated;
Box Office $95.36 million;
$29.99 DVD, $35.99 Blu-ray, $43.99 UHD BD;
Rated ‘PG’ for some thematic elements and mile peril.
Voices of Stephanie Beatriz, María Cecilia Botero, John Leguizamo, Jessica Darrow, Angie Cepeda, Carolina Gaitán, Diane Guerrero.

The 60th feature film from the Walt Disney Animation studio, the colorful Encanto provides a heartfelt story with strong Latin American flair that will keep audiences thoroughly entertained.

With songs by Lin-Manuel Miranda, the film tells the story of a small Colombian village protected by magic and watched over by the Madrigal family. The family’s matriarch, Abuela (María Cecilia Botero), was fleeing oppression with her three children when her husband was killed by a pursuing force. Out of anger and despair, she unleashes a magical blast that propels her attackers and creates the encanto, a charmed realm hidden by mountains. The magic protecting the new village is contained in a perpetually lit candle that gives members of the Madrigal family special powers on their fifth birthday, with the exception of Mirabel (Stephanie Beatriz), who is seemingly given no gift.

Now 15 and coping with being the only member of her family without powers, Mirabel finds herself as the key to resolving a prophecy that could mean the end of the encanto and the destruction of her family.

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Among the slew of extras is a sing-along mode that displays lyrics on screen, and the ability to jump to any song in the film.

Featurettes include the 24-minute “Familia lo es Todo” about the film’s strong family themes, the 17-and-a-half-minute “Discover Colombia” about the cultural touchstones of the film, the 24-minute “A Journey Through Music,” the eight-minute “Let’s Talk About Bruno” about a key character and the signature song focused on him, the 10-and-a-half-minute “Our Casita” about the film’s magical living house, and the two-and-a-half minute travelogue “Journey to Colombia.”

There’s also a three-minute clip of outtakes, and four deleted sequences in storyboard form that with filmmaker introductions run a total of about 20 minutes.

Also accompanying the film is the delightful nine-minute animated short Far From the Tree about a family of raccoons that imparts harsh survival lessons down through the generations.

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