Departed Turner CEO John Martin Was a Friend of Home Entertainment

NEWS ANALYSIS – Lost in the rapid-fire of events at the closure of AT&T’s $85 billion purchase of Time Warner was the departure of John Martin, CEO of Turner.

AT&T Entertainment CEO John Stankey, who became CEO of renamed WarnerMedia, replacing retiring CEO Jeff Bewkes (at former Time Warner), made the announcement June 15 in a memo to employees.

WarnerMedia includes Warner Bros., HBO and Turner (TBS, TNT, CNN, Turner Sports, Cartoon Network, among others).

Martin, who was also former CFO of Time Warner, was appointed CEO of Turner in 2014 by Bewkes. A proponent of the merger, Martin also once called AT&T’s online TV platform DirecTV Now, “a money-losing business,” – a comment not likely ignored by his new corporate bosses.

“This initial Turner organization structure will allow me to work more closely with more Turner leaders and accelerate my personal learning of the business as we define our shared priorities across the company,” said Stankey regarding Martin and other Time Warner executives’ exits.

Regardless, Martin was a long-time advocate of home entertainment – including UltraViolet and electronic sellthrough of content.

In 2010, Martin backed the short-lived rollout of premium VOD, which would allow consumers to rent a new-release theatrical movies in the home within days of its box office debut.

In 2012, on a fiscal call, Martin showed a sense of humor when he said he was encouraged by “recent signs” of stabilization in home entertainment, with total consumer spending “actually flat” for the year.

He chastised the industry (i.e. Disney) for not rallying around UltraViolet as the primary cloud-based content ownership platform.

“Look, challenges still exist [in home video],” Martin told a separate investor event, adding that secular challenges had mandated the industry to embrace alternative distribution strategies such as street-date transactional video-on-demand and premium VOD, among others.

“Warner Bros. has been the leading studio at trying to move toward embracing new technology, advantaging channels that are higher margin and disadvantaging those channels that are lower margin,” he said.

Martin believed it was that mindset that pushed Warner to spearhead rollout of UltraViolet. He said adoption of the platform was “not where we want it to be,” but that the studio took the leadership position at the time when ongoing technological challenges mandated action.

“Somebody’s got to try and move forward because the industry has to move more quickly to embrace these higher-margin opportunities,” he said.

Warner earlier this year joined Disney and other studios (except Lionsgate and Paramount Pictures) in support of the latter’s rebranded Movies Anywhere platform.

 

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