CEO: AT&T Turning the Page on Pay-TV; Embracing Streaming Video, Broadband

AT&T, like Comcast Cable, has been hemorrhaging pay-TV subscribers in recent years. The corporate owner of DirecTV and AT&T U-verse lost about 4 million combined subscribers in 2019, which included former online TV service DirecTV Now as consumers increasingly cut the cord in search of cheaper over-the-top video alternatives.

In response, subsidiary WarnerMedia rolled out subscription streaming platform HBO Max on May 27, with a planned ad-supported VOD option set for 2021. Speaking from the corporate office Sept. 15 during the Goldman Sachs 29th Annual Communicopia Conference, CEO John Stankey said the linear pay-TV business afforded the telecom upwards of 28% household share, which he said doesn’t work in today’s connectivity/entertainment ecosystem.

John Stankey

Stankey said rollout of HBO Max and requisite high-speed Internet business could result in AT&T having upwards of 70% household share going forward.

“We really need products and services that maybe have different characterization within the home,” Stankey said. “Hopefully a little bit lower price point that can be in more households and I think that’s why HBO Max is so attractive.”

The executive said he couldn’t be more pleased with the Max rollout despite scuttlebutt the service has underperformed with consumers and existing HBO subscribers indifferent to switching platforms. Stankey said comparing Max with Netflix or Disney+ is counterproductive, adding that Disney had a very different “set of plays to run” than WarnerMedia and AT&T had available.

“We’ve done incredibly well … growing the combination of HBO and HBO Max customers,” Stankey said. “HBO had been stagnat[ing] at a [certain] customer count. The only time it went up a little bit was when a new season of ‘Game of Thrones’ would come out, and then it would kind of work back down the backside.”

The CEO said hours of engagement among Max subs is higher than for HBO pay-TV subs, without elaborating on the number of actual Max members.

“And that’s a good thing for the future, because the more times a week, the more times a day that a customer wants to go and touch an [Max, AT&T] application, the more relevant you’re going to be over time,” Stankey said.

He said Warner Bros. remains in the “middle innings” of a “nine-inning game” understanding the COVID-19 impact on theatrical distribution. Stankey said the studio would continue experimenting with all avenues of distribution, including premium VOD, transactional VOD and theatrical going forward.

Indeed, Warner Bros. again delayed the sequel Wonder Woman 1984 until Christmas Day, from Oct. 2, the previous date to which it was delayed.

“We’ve got a few more to play out,” he said. “And I don’t think we’ll know exactly how it plays out until we’re ‘back to normal,’ where people are moving around in society without fear of risk and that means the concentration of the number of people getting into a building.”

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